Ae in Scrabble Dictionary

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Is ae a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word ae is a Scrabble US word. The word ae is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

A1E1

Is ae a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word ae is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

A1E1

Is ae a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word ae is a Words With Friends word. The word ae is worth 2 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

A1E1

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Valid words made from Ae

You can make 3 words from 'ae' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

2 letters words from 'ae'

AE 2EA 2

Definitions and meaning of ae

ae

Etymology

Variant form of æ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /iː/, /eɪ/, /ə/
  • Rhymes: -iː, -eɪ,

Symbol

ae

  1. Variant of æ.

See also

  • a.e.

References

  • “ae”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 2000, →ISBN.
  • “ae” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Anagrams

  • EA, Ea, ea, ea.

Abinomn

Noun

ae

  1. mother

Aore

Noun

ae

  1. water

Further reading

  • Darrell T. Tryon, New Hebrides languages: an internal classification (1976)
  • ABVD

Bislama

Etymology

From English eye.

Noun

ae

  1. (anatomy) eye

Danish

Etymology

Probably derived from the interjection ah.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aːə/, [ˈæːæ]
  • Rhymes: -aːə
  • Homophone: age

Verb

ae (past tense aede, past participle aet)

  1. to stroke, pat, caress

Inflection


Eastern Ngad'a

Noun

ae

  1. water

References

  • Greenhill, S.J., Blust. R, & Gray, R.D. (2008). The Austronesian Basic Vocabulary Database: From Bioinformatics to Lexomics. Evolutionary Bioinformatics, 4:271-283.

Ende

Etymology

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun

ae

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

References

  • Bradley J. McDonnell, Possessive Structures in Ende: a Language of Eastern Indonesia

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eː/

Etymology 1

From Middle Irish áe (liver), from Old Irish óa, from Proto-Celtic *awV-. Compare Welsh afu.

Noun

ae m (genitive singular ae, nominative plural aenna)

  1. (anatomy) liver
Declension
  • Alternative plural: aebha, aobha
  • Alternative genitive plural: ae (in certain phrases)
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Noun

ae m (genitive singular ae)

  1. Alternative form of aoi (metrical composition)
Declension

Mutation

Further reading

  • "ae" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 áe ("liver")”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “ae” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “ae” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Kala

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑe/

Noun

ae

  1. tree

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988) (ai)
  • Morris Johnson, Kela Organized Phonology Data (1994) (ae)

Khumi Chin

Etymology

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *ʔaar. Cognates include Zou ah and Mizo ár.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʔɛ˧/

Noun

ae

  1. chicken

References

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[1], Payap University, page 44

Latin

Participle

ae

  1. nominative feminine plural of us
  2. genitive feminine singular of us
  3. dative feminine singular of us
  4. vocative feminine plural of us

References

  • ae in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ae in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Lavukaleve

Verb

ae

  1. (intransitive) go up

Li'o

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun

ae

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

References

  • P. Sawardo, Struktur bahasa Lio (1987)
  • Louise Baird, A Grammar of Kéo: An Austronesian Language of East Nusantara (2002) ('aé)

Lote

Noun

ae

  1. tree

References

  • Greg Pearson, René van den Berg, Lote Grammar Sketch (2008)

Middle Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aɨ̯/

Conjunction

ae ... ae

  1. either ... or
    • Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet:
      Sef kyfryw chware a wneynt, taraw a wnai pob un dyrnawt ar y got, ae a’e droet ae a throssawl;
      In this manner they played the game, each of them striking the bag, either with his foot or with a staff.

Descendants

  • Welsh: ai

Niuean

Etymology

From Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *a(a)e.

Interjection

ae

  1. used to draw attention; hey!
  2. expression of surprise; oh!

Portuguese

Etymology

From .

Interjection

ae

  1. (Internet slang, Brazil) oh yeah (expression of joy or approvement)

Sardinian

Alternative forms

  • ave (Nuorese)

Etymology

Inherited from Latin avem, accusative of avis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈae/

Noun

ae f (plural aes)

  1. (Logudorese) bird (in general), especially eagles or other birds of prey
    Synonyms: achedda, puzone

Usage notes

According to Max Leopold Wagner in his etymological dictionary, ae means bird in a general almost collective sense, while a specific bird is usually called a puzone. The term also has a tendency to mean 'eagle' in central dialects, and by extension also 'vulture' and other birds of prey.

Further reading

  • Rubattu, Antoninu (2006), “uccello”, in Dizionario universale della lingua di Sardegna, 2nd edition, Sassari: Edes
  • Wagner, Max Leopold (1960–1964), “áve”, in Dizionario etimologico sardo, Heidelberg

Scots

Alternative forms

  • a'e, yae, ya, yeh
  • eäe (Southern, Dialect)
  • ee (Shetland)

Etymology

From Northern Middle English ane, from Old English ān (one), from Proto-West Germanic *ain. See also ane.

Pronunciation

  • (Shetland, northern East Central Scots) IPA(key): /eː/
  • (southern East Central Scots, South-West Scots) IPA(key): /jeː/
  • (Southern Scotland) IPA(key): /jɛː/, /jæː/

Numeral

ae

  1. one
    Synonym: ane

Pronoun

ae

  1. one (of the two)
  2. one, someone (indefinite)

Adjective

ae (not comparable)

  1. one, the same

Adverb

ae (not comparable)

  1. only
  2. about, approximately
    Synonym: a
  3. (poetic) Emphasises a superlative.

Derived terms

  • aefauld
  • aeness
  • aesome

References


West Makian

Etymology

Possibly cognate with Ternate hohe (to laugh).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.e/

Verb

ae

  1. (intransitive) to laugh

References

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[2], Pacific linguistics

Wolio

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qaqay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaqay.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ae/

Noun

ae

  1. foot, leg

References

  • Anceaux, Johannes C. (1987) Wolio Dictionary (Wolio-English-Indonesian) / Kamus Bahasa Wolio (Wolio-Inggeris-Indonesia), Dordrecht: Foris

Zhuang

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /ʔai˨˦/
  • Tone numbers: ae1
  • Hyphenation: ae

Etymology 1

Classifier

ae (Sawndip forms or ⿰亻界 or 𠲖, old orthography əi)

  1. used for adult men

Etymology 2

From Proto-Tai *ʔajᴬ (to cough). Cognate with Thai ไอ (ai), Northern Thai ᩋᩱ, Lao ໄອ (ʼai), ᦺᦀ (˙ʼay), Shan ဢႆ (ʼǎy), Tai Nüa ᥟᥭ (ʼay), Aiton ဢႝ (ʼay), Ahom 𑜒𑜩 (ʼay), Saek ไอ๋.

Verb

ae (Sawndip forms or 𧙜 or 𠲖 or , old orthography əi)

  1. to cough

Source: wiktionary.org
  • (Scots) one.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)