Age in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does age mean? Is age a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is age worth? age how many points in Words With Friends? What does age mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for age

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Is age a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word age is a Scrabble US word. The word age is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

A1G2E1

Is age a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word age is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

A1G2E1

Is age a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word age is a Words With Friends word. The word age is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

A1G3E1

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Valid words made from Age

You can make 6 words from 'age' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'age'

AGE 4GAE 4

2 letters words from 'age'

AE 2AG 3
EA 2 

All 3 letters words made out of age

age gae aeg eag gea ega

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word age. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in age.

Definitions and meaning of age

age

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eɪd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Etymology

From Middle English age, borrowed from Anglo-Norman age, from Old French aage, eage (Modern French âge), from assumed unattested Vulgar Latin *aetāticum, from Latin aetātem, accusative form of aetās, from aevum (lifetime), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyu- (vital force). Displaced native Middle English elde (age) (modern eld; from Old English ieldu, eldo, ieldo (age)).

Noun

age (countable and uncountable, plural ages)

  1. (countable) The whole duration of a being, whether animal, plant, or other kind, being alive.
  2. (countable) The number of full years, months, days, hours, etc., that someone, or something, has been alive.
  3. (countable) One of the stages of life.
  4. (countable) The time of life at which some particular power or capacity is understood to become vested.
  5. (countable) A particular period of time in history, as distinguished from others.
  6. (countable) A great period in the history of the Earth.
  7. (countable) A period of one hundred years; a century.
  8. (countable) The people who live during a particular period.
  9. (countable) A generation.
  10. (countable, hyperbolic) A long time.
  11. (countable, geology) A unit of geologic time subdividing an epoch into smaller parts.
  12. (countable, poker) The right of the player to the left of the dealer to pass the first round in betting, and then to come in last or stay out; also, the player holding this position; the eldest hand.
  13. (uncountable) That part of the duration of a being or a thing which is between its beginning and any given time; specifically the size of that part.
  14. (uncountable) Mature age; especially, the time of life at which one attains full personal rights and capacities.
  15. (uncountable) An advanced period of life; the latter part of life; the state of being old; eld, seniority.

Synonyms

  • (duration of a life): lifespan, lifetime
  • (period (in years or otherwise) something has been alive): eld
  • (particular period of time): epoch, time; see also Thesaurus:era
  • (period of one hundred years): centennium, yearhundred
  • (long time): eternity, yonks; see also Thesaurus:eon
  • (latter part of life): dotage, old age, eld; see also Thesaurus:old age

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

age (third-person singular simple present ages, present participle ageing or (US) aging, simple past and past participle aged)

  1. (transitive) To cause to grow old; to impart the characteristics of age to.
  2. (transitive, figurative) To postpone an action that would extinguish something, as a debt.
  3. (transitive, accounting) To categorize by age.
  4. (intransitive) To grow aged; to become old; to show marks of age.

Synonyms

  • (cause to grow old): mature; see also Thesaurus:make older
  • (grow aged): elden; see also Thesaurus:to age

Translations

See also

  • age on Wikiquote.Wikiquote
  • Appendix:Age by decade

Further reading

  • age in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • age in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

Anagrams

  • EGA, Ega, G. E. A.

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse aka (to drive), from Proto-Germanic *akaną, cognate with Swedish åka. The verb goes back to Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵeti, which is also the source of Latin agō, Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aːɣə/, [ˈæːjə], [ˈæːæ]
  • Homophone: ae

Verb

age (past tense agede, past participle aget)

  1. (intransitive, dated) to drive (in a vehicle)
  2. (transitive, obsolete) to drive (a vehicle), transport

Inflection

Further reading

  • “age” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Etymology

From a dialectal variant of haie, ultimately from Latin haga, borrowed from Frankish *haggju. More at English hedge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aʒ/
  • Rhymes: -aʒ

Noun

age m (plural ages)

  1. beam (central bar of a plough)
  2. shaft

Further reading

  • “age” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Irish

Alternative forms

  • aige

Pronunciation

  • (Munster) IPA(key): /ˈɛɡə/

Preposition

age

  1. Munster form of ag (used before a possessive determiner)
    • 1939, Peig Sayers, “Inghean an Cheannaidhe”, printed in Marie-Louise Sjoestedt, Description d’un parler irlandais de Kerry, Bibliothèque de l'École des Hautes Études 270. Paris: Librairie Honoré Champion, p. 193:

Japanese

Romanization

age

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あげ

Kott

Etymology

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔaqV (to make sour, to rot). Compare Assan bar-ak (rotten) and Arin bar-oje (rotten).

Adjective

age

  1. rotten

Related terms

  • b-āge-jaŋ
  • d́āgejaŋ

Latin

Etymology

Imperative form of agō

Interjection

age

  1. well now, well then, come now (transition)
  2. very well, good, right (sign of affirmation)

Verb

age

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of agō

Mapudungun

Noun

age (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. (anatomy) face

References

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old Norse agi.

Noun

age

  1. Alternative form of awe

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Old French aage, eage, from Vulgar Latin *aetāticum, from Latin aetās.

Alternative forms

  • aage, ayge (both rare)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈaːdʒ(ə)/

Noun

age (plural ages)

  1. The age of someone (or rarely, something); the amount of time which someone has existed for.
  2. The correct or traditional age for doing something (especially the age of maturity)
  3. The state of being old, elderly, or aged; senescence or old age.
  4. The life of something or someone; the length of time where a person or thing exists.
  5. A period or portion of time; an age, epoch, or era.
  6. Time (as an abstract concept); the passing of time.
  7. (rare, in every age) A person or individual who is of a given or certain age.
Related terms
  • agen
Descendants
  • English: age
  • Scots: age
References
  • “āǧe (n.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-01-19.

Occitan

Noun

age m (plural ages)

  1. age

Old Frisian

Alternative forms

  • āg

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *augā, from Proto-Germanic *augô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ekʷ- (eye, to see). Cognates include Old English ēage, Old Saxon ōga and Old Dutch ōga.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈaːɣe/

Noun

āge n

  1. (anatomy) eye

Inflection

Descendants

  • North Frisian:
    Most dialects: uug
    Goesharde: uug, uuch
    Halligen: uuch
    Heligoland: Oog
    Sylt: Oog
  • Saterland Frisian: Ooge
  • West Frisian: each

References

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Portuguese

Verb

age

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of agir
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of agir

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English age

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /edʒ/

Noun

age (plural ages)

  1. age

Verb

age (third-person singular present ages, present participle agin, past aged, past participle aged)

  1. to age

References

  • Eagle, Andy, ed. (2016) The Online Scots Dictionary, Scots Online.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to grow old.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)