Ago in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does ago mean? Is ago a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is ago worth? ago how many points in Words With Friends? What does ago mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for ago

See how to calculate how many points for ago.

Is ago a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word ago is a Scrabble US word. The word ago is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

A1G2O1

Is ago a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word ago is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

A1G2O1

Is ago a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word ago is a Words With Friends word. The word ago is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

A1G3O1

Our tools

Valid words made from Ago

You can make 4 words from 'ago' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

3 letters words from 'ago'

AGO 4GOA 4

2 letters words from 'ago'

AG 3GO 3

All 3 letters words made out of ago

ago gao aog oag goa oga

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word ago. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in ago.

Definitions and meaning of ago

ago

Alternative forms

  • agoe, agon, agone, ygo, ygoe (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English ago, agon (passed), past participle of agon (to depart, escape, pass), from Old English āgān (to go away, pass away, go forth, come to pass), from Proto-Germanic *uz- (out), *gāną (to go), equivalent to a- +‎ gone. Cognate with German ergehen (to come to pass, fare, go forth). Compare also Old Saxon āgangan (to go or pass by), Gothic 𐌿𐍃𐌲𐌰𐌲𐌲𐌰𐌽 (usgaggan, to go forth).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: ə-gō', IPA(key): /əˈɡoʊ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ə-gō', IPA(key): /əˈɡəʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Adjective

ago (comparative more ago, superlative most ago)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) Gone; gone by; gone away; passed; passed away.
  2. (archaic or dialectal) Nearly gone; dead (used in Devonshire at the turn of the 19th century)

Usage notes

  • Usually follows the noun.

Adverb

ago (comparative more ago, superlative most ago)

  1. before
    When they first met in 2000, my dad told my mom how he had gotten the money. The story begins 20 years ago.

Postposition

ago

  1. Before now.

Derived terms

  • four score and seven years ago
  • long ago
  • many moons ago

Translations

See also

  • Preposition and postposition on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • G. A. Cooke, The County of Devon
  • ago at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • ago in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • AOG, G. O. A., G.O.A., GAO, GOA, Gao, Goa, goa, oga

Albanian

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish آغا(ağa) (compare Turkish ağa) or Greek άγιος (ágios).

Noun

ago m

  1. (Gheg, archaic, poetic) god

Esperanto

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin agō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡo/
  • Hyphenation: a‧go

Noun

ago (accusative singular agon, plural agoj, accusative plural agojn)

  1. act, action

Synonyms

  • (action): agado

Derived terms


Ido

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin agō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡo/

Noun

ago (plural agi)

  1. act, action, deed

Synonyms

  • (action): agado

Derived terms


Istriot

Etymology

From Latin acus.

Noun

ago m

  1. needle

Italian

Etymology

From Latin acus (needle), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp). Compare Romanian ac.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.ɡo/
  • Rhymes: -aɡo

Noun

ago m (plural aghi)

  1. needle

Related terms

  • aguglia (compass needle)

Derived terms

  • aghetto, aghino (diminutives)
  • ago di pino
  • agone (augmentative)

Anagrams

  • goa

Japanese

Romanization

ago

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あご

Karipúna Creole French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aˈɡo/

Interjection

ago?

  1. may I come in?

References

  • 1987, Alfred W. Tobler, Dicionário Crioulo Karipúna/Português Português/Crioulo Karípúna, Summer Institute of Linguistics, page 43.

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *agō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵeti.

Cognate with Old Irish aigid, Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō, I lead), Old Norse aka (move, drive), Avestan 𐬀𐬰𐬀𐬌𐬙𐬌(azaiti), Sanskrit अजति (ájati, to drive, propel, cast).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈa.ɡoː/, [ˈäɡoː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈa.ɡo/, [ˈäːɡɔ]

Verb

agō (present infinitive agere, perfect active ēgī, supine āctum); third conjugation

  1. I act, I behave
    • 405, Jerome and others, Vulgate, Paralipomenon II 32:7
      viriliter agite et confortamini nolite timere nec paveatis regem Assyriorum []
      "Act strongly and be courageous. Do not fear nor tremble before the king of Assyria"
  2. I do
    "Agere...does not express, as facere does, the principle, author, nor a single act of producing; but a series of cares and a continued activity." - Latin Synonyms, with Their Different Significations, etc. by M. J. B. Gardin Dumesnil, Trans. Gosset, London, 1819.
    "Agere, Facere et Gerere hoc differunt, quod agere et corporis, et vocis, et mentis agitatum comprehendit. Facere tantum refertur ad opera, quae corpore efficimus; aliquando et pro consentire ponitur. His enim loquendi modis utebantur recte antiqui: mecum seu tecum faciam, hoc est, mecum seu tecum consentiam. Gerere est muneris et oneris..." - Ausonii Popmae frisii de differentiis verborum cum additamentis ab Hekelii, Richteri, Messerschmidii et Vallaurii, 1865.
    • c. 200 BCE, Plautus Amphitryon 2.1.1
      (AMPHITRYON to SOSIA): age ī tū secundum,
      Direct/literal translation: "Do thou walk after/following (me)!" Functional/colloquial translation: "Come, do follow after me!"
    • 63 B.C.E., Cicero, Catiline Orations (Latin text and English translations here)
      Nihil agis, nihil moliris, nihil cogitas quod non ego non modo audiam sed etiam videam planeque sentiam.
      "You do nothing, you plan nothing, you think of nothing which I not only do not hear, but which I do not see and know every particular of."
  3. I make (something that does not continue to exist after the maker stops)
  4. I negotiate
  5. I effect, accomplish, achieve
  6. I treat, I deal
    • (Can we date this quote?) Virgil (in translation), Aeneid Book I, line 575
      Trōs Tyriusque mihī nūllō discrīmine agētur.
      "Trojan and Tyrian shall be treated by me with no distinction."
  7. I act, play, perform (e.g., a role in a play)
  8. I perform, transact, conduct, manage (e.g. business, affairs)
  9. I administer, direct, guide, govern
  10. I drive (sense of providing an impetus for motion), impel, move, push, put in motion
  11. I conduct, drive (sense of providing governance to motion)
    • 1877, Sophocles (in translation), Electra, in Aeschyli et Sophoclis: Tragoediae et Fragmenta (Paris: Institutiae Franciae Typographo)
      Intereā Orestēs postrēmus omnium ultimō locō equōs agēbat, in fīne certam spem victōriae ponēns.
      "Meanwhile, Orestes had been driving in last place and holding his horses back, putting his trust in the finish."
  12. I discuss, debate, deliberate (used in civil, political and legal contexts)
  13. (law) I plead
  14. I think upon; I am occupied with
  15. I aim at, I get at (generally in the subjunctive mood and preceded by ut, and so meaning: "that I might achieve...")
  16. I stir up, excite, cause, induce
  17. I lead, drive (e.g., livestock)
  18. I chase, pursue
  19. I drive at, pursue (a course of action)
  20. I rob, steal, plunder, carry off
  21. (of time) I pass, spend, lead
  22. (of offerings) I slay, kill (as a sacrifice)
  23. (of plants) I put forth, sprout, extend
  24. (law) I hold (a court)
  25. (passive) to go on, to take place, to be at issue

Conjugation

Usage notes

Ago renders a sense of doing or making which is continuative or behavioral. For a sense of a specific instance or occasion of doing or making, see facio. For a sense of doing or making which is yet more continuative, see agito and gero.

According to Döderlein, another difference between ago and facio when they mean "make" is that ago typically has to do with making something that does not continue after the "actor" stops doing the action; whereas with facio, the object continues to exist after the maker has made the thing. In other words, ago is temporal, whereas facio is spacial.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • ago in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ago in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ago in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Further reading

  • ago in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Lolopo

Etymology

From Proto-Loloish *go¹ (Bradley). Cognate with Burmese အစ်ကို (ackui).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʔa³³ko³³]

Noun

ago 

  1. (Yao'an) elder brother

Maranao

Etymology

Akin to Cebuano ug.

Conjunction

ago

  1. and

Samoan

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Cognate with Tongan ango.

Noun

ago

  1. turmeric

Usage notes

Once cooked, it is called lega.


Ternate

Etymology

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈa.ɡo]

Noun

ago

  1. a kind of root crop

References

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Võro

Etymology

Disputed origin; cognate to Estonian agu.

Noun

ago (genitive ao, partitive ako)

  1. twilight

Inflection

Derived terms


Source: wiktionary.org
  • in the past.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)