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An in Scrabble Dictionary

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Yes. The word an is a Scrabble US word. The word an is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

A1N1

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A1N1

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AN 2NA 2

Definitions and meaning of an

an

Pronunciation

  • (stressed)
    • IPA(key): /æn/
    • Rhymes: -æn
  • (unstressed)
    • IPA(key): /ən/
  • Homophone: in (in some accents)

Etymology 1

From Middle English an, from Old English ān (a, an, literally one).

Article

an (indefinite)

  1. Form of a (all article senses).
    1. Used before a vowel sound.
    2. (now quite rare) Used before /h/ in an unstressed syllable.
    3. (nonstandard) Used before /h/ in a stressed syllable.
    4. (obsolete) Used before one and words with initial u, eu.
    5. (nonstandard, Britain, West Country) Used before all consonants.
Usage notes
  • In standard English, the article an is used before vowel sounds, while a is used before consonant sounds. Alternatively, an can be found before an unstressed syllable beginning with an h-sound, as in an historic. The h may then become silent or is at least very weakly articulated. This usage is favoured by only 6% of British speakers, and is only slightly more common in writing.
  • Historically, an could also be found before one and many words with initial u, eu (now pronounced with initial /juː/, /jʊ/, /jə/), such as eunuch, unique, or utility. This is as these words formerly started with a vowel sound, though the writing of an before words spelt with initial u, eu continued up into the 19th century, long after these words had acquired initial consonant sounds in standard English.
  • In the other direction, a can rarely be found before a vowel in nonstandard (often dialectal) speech and written representations thereof, as in "ain't this a innerestin sitchation" (Moira Young, Blood Red Road).
  • The various article senses of a are all senses of an.
Translations

See an/translations § Article.

Numeral

an

  1. (nonstandard, Britain, West Country) one

References

Etymology 2

From Middle English an.

Conjunction

an

  1. (archaic) If
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I Scene 2:
      [] An the worst fall that ever fell, I hope I shall make shift to go without him.
    • 1886-88, Richard F. Burton, The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night:
      Thereupon, quoth he, "O woman, for sundry days I have seen thee attend the levée sans a word said; so tell me an thou have any requirement I may grant."
  2. (archaic) So long as.
  3. (archaic) As if; as though.
    • 1797, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere (original version), 61-64:
Translations

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Georgian ან (an).

Noun

an (plural ans)

  1. The first letter of the Georgian alphabet, ა (Mkhedruli), Ⴀ (Asomtavruli) or ⴀ (Nuskhuri).

Etymology 4

From the Old English an, on (preposition).

Preposition

an

  1. In each; to or for each; per.
    I was only going twenty miles an hour.
Usage notes
  • This is the same as the word a in such contexts, modified because of preceding an unpronounced h. The train was speeding along at a mile a minute.
Synonyms
  • per
Translations

References

  • an in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • N.A., N/A, NA, n.a., n/a, na

Afrikaans

Preposition

an

  1. Obsolete form of aan.

Albanian

Etymology

Possibly a metaphorical use of anë (vessel).

Noun

an m (definite singular ani)

  1. (anatomy) womb, caul
    Synonym: mitër
  2. (anatomy) joint
  3. (dialectal) room, vessel
  4. (dialectal, Italy) ship

Related terms

  • anë

Arin

Noun

an

  1. haunch

Aromanian

Etymology

From Latin annus. Compare Romanian an.

Noun

an n (plural anji)

  1. year

Azerbaijani

Etymology

From Arabic آن(ʾān).

Noun

an (definite accusative anı, plural anlar)

  1. moment

Declension

Derived terms

  • hər anda
  • anlıq

Bambara

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [án]

Pronoun

an

  1. we

Bikol Central

Article

an

  1. the

Pronoun

an

  1. (dialectal) that, it (near the person spoken to, but away from the speaker)
    Synonym: iyan

Bourguignon

Etymology 1

From Latin annus.

Noun

an m (plural ans)

  1. year
Derived terms
  • annaie

Etymology 2

From Latin in

Preposition

an

  1. in
Synonyms
  • an-dians
  • dans

Etymology 3

From Latin inde

Pronoun

an

  1. used to indicate an indefinite quantity, of it, of them
    J'an veus deus
    I want two of them
    J'an seus seur
    I am sure of it

Breton

Alternative forms

  • ar
  • al

Article

an

  1. the

Chuukese

Determiner

an

  1. third person singular possessive; his, hers, its (used with general-class objects)

Related terms


Noun

an

  1. path, road

Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • a (Luserna)

Etymology

From Middle High German ein, from Old High German ein, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz. Cognate with German ein, Dutch een, English one, Icelandic einn.

Article

an

  1. (Sette Comuni) a, an
  2. (Luserna) oblique masculine of a

Declension

Conjunction

an

  1. (Sette Comuni) that (introduces a subordinate clause)

References

  • “an” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo
  • “an” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Cornish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Article

an

  1. the (definite article)

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

Ultimately from Arabic آن(ʾān).

Noun

an

  1. moment

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[1], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle Low German an and Danish an, from Proto-Germanic *ana (on, at), cognate with English on and Danish å, Danish .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈan]

Adverb

an

  1. on (only used in lexicalized expressions)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈæˀn]

Verb

an

  1. imperative of ane

Elfdalian

Etymology

From Old Norse hann. Cognate with Swedish han.

Pronoun

an m

  1. he

Emilian

Etymology

From Latin annus.

Noun

an m

  1. year

French

Etymology

From Old French, from Latin annus, from Proto-Italic *atnos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂et-no-, probably from *h₂et- (to go).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃/

Noun

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

Synonyms

  • année

Further reading

  • “an” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • n'a

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin annus.

Noun

an m (plural agns)

  1. year

Fula

Determiner

an (singular)

  1. (possessive) Alternative form of am (my).

Usage notes

  • Used in Pular.

References

  • Oumar Bah, Dictionnaire Pular-Français, Avec un index français-pular, Webonary.org, SIL International, 2014.

Fuyug

Noun

an (plural aning)

  1. man

References

  • Robert L. Bradshaw, Fuyug grammar sketch (2007)

German

Etymology

From Old High German ana.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʔan/
  • Rhymes: -an

Preposition

an (+ dative)

  1. (local) on; upon; at; in; against
  2. by; near; close to; next to
  3. (temporal) on; in; at
  4. (temporal) a; per; only used with the word Tag (day), otherwise use in

an (+ accusative)

  1. on; onto
  2. at; against
  3. to; for

Usage notes

  • Usually used to refer to something being on a vertical surface, as opposed to auf, which usually points to a horizontal surface.
  • When followed by the masculine/neuter definite article in the dative case (i.e. dem (the)), the two words can contract to am (on the).
  • When followed by the neuter definite article in the accusative case (i.e. das (the)), the two words can contract to ans (on the).

Adverb

an

  1. onward; on

Adjective

an (not comparable)

  1. (predicative) on

Synonyms

  • angeschaltet
  • ein
  • eingeschaltet

Antonyms

  • aus
  • ausgeschaltet

Derived terms

  • (an + dem) am
  • (an + das) ans
  • anhin
  • wohlan, wolan

Anagrams

  • na

Girawa

Noun

an

  1. water

Further reading

  • Patricia Lillie, Girawa Dictionary

Gothic

Romanization

an

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌽

Haitian Creole

Etymology 1

From French un.

Article

an

  1. the (definite article)
Usage notes

Use this word when:

  • It modifies a singular noun, and
  • It is preceded by a word that ends with either:
    • A nasal vowel, or
    • A nasal consonant and an oral (non-nasal) vowel, in that order.

See also

  • a
  • la
  • lan
  • nan
  • yo
  • yon

Etymology 2

From French an (year)

Noun

an

  1. year
Synonyms
  • lane

Ido

Etymology

Borrowed from English onGerman an. Decision no. 759, Progreso V.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /an/

Preposition

an

  1. at, on (indicates contiguity, juxtaposition)

Derived terms

  • dorso an dorso (back to back)
  • an-

References

  • Progreso IV (in Ido), 1911–1912, pages 409, 523, 591, 622
  • Progreso V (in Ido), 1912–1913, page 659

Irish

Etymology 1

From Old Irish in, from Proto-Celtic *sindos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ənˠ/, (between consonants) /ə/, (before a/á, o/ó, u/ú) /ə.nˠ-/, (before e/é, i/í) /ə.n̠ʲ-/

Article

an

  1. the
Declension

Etymology 2

From Old Irish in.

Pronunciation

  • (preverbal particle): IPA(key): (before a consonant) /ə/, (before a/á, o/ó, u/ú) /ə.nˠ-/, (before e/é, i/í) /ə.n̠ʲ-/
  • (copular particle): IPA(key): /ənˠ/, (before é, ea, í, iad) /ə.n̠ʲ-/

Particle 1

an (triggers eclipsis; takes the dependent form of irregular verbs if available; not used in the past tense except of some irregular verbs)

  1. Used to form direct and indirect questions
Related terms
  • ar (used with the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

Particle 2

an

  1. used to introduce copular questions, both direct and indirect, in the present/future tense
Related terms

Etymology 3

Verb

an (present analytic anann, future analytic anfaidh, verbal noun anacht, past participle anta)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) Alternative form of fan (stay, wait, remain)
Conjugation

Etymology 4

Particle

an

  1. Alternative form of a (used before numbers when counting)

Mutation

Further reading

  • "an" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “in”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “an” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “an” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Japanese

Romanization

an

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あん

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin annus.

Noun

an m (plural ani)

  1. year

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *an, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂en. Cognate with Lithuanian angu (or), Gothic 𐌰𐌽 (an, so? now?). May also be related to Ancient Greek ἄν (án, particle), Sanskrit अना (anā́), Avestan 𐬀𐬥𐬁(anā), Lithuanian anàs, Albanian a, Proto-Slavic *onъ.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /an/
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /an/

Conjunction

an

  1. or, or whether (A conjunction that introduces the second part of a disjunctive interrogation, or a phrase implying doubt.)
    1. in disjunctive interrogations
      1. direct
        1. (introduced by utrum (whether))
        2. (introduced by -ne (interrogative enclitic))
        3. (introduced by nonne ([is it] not))
        4. (introduced by num (interrogative particle))
        5. (without an introductory particle)
      2. indirect
        1. (introduced by utrum (whether))
        2. (introduced by -ne, interrogative enclitic)
        3. (introduced by an)
        4. (without an introductory particle)
      3. or rather, or on the contrary (where the opinion of the speaker or the probability inclines to the second interrogative clause, and this is made emphatic, as a corrective of the former)
        1. hence, in the comic poets, as an potius
      4. or, or rather, or indeed, or perhaps (where, as is frequent, the first part of the interrogation is not expressed, but is to be supplied from the context, an begins the interrogation, but it does not begin an absolute – i.e., non-disjunctive – interrogation)
      5. (in the phrase an nōn) or not
        1. in direct questions
        2. in indirect questions
      6. (in the phrase an ne) pleonastic usage for an
        1. in direct questions
        2. in indirect questions
    2. (in disjunctive clauses that express doubt) or
      1. ?
      2. denoting uncertainty by itself, without a verb of doubting
      3. (chiefly in and after the Augustean period) standing for sīve
      4. where the first disjunctive clause is to be supplied from the general idea or where an stands for utrum or necne
      5. Since in such distributive sentences expressive of doubt, the opinion of the speaker or the probability usually inclines to the second, i.e. to the clause beginning with an, the expressions haud sciō an, nesciō an, and dubitō an incline to an affirmative signification, “I almost know”, “I am inclined to think”, “I almost think”, “I might say”, “I might assert that”, etc., for “perhaps”, “probably”.
      6. Sometimes the distributive clause beginning with an designates directly the opposite, the more improbable, the negative; in which case nesciō an, haud sciō an, etc., like the English I know not whether, signify “I think that not”, “I believe that not”, etc.

Usage notes

  • Used with utrum (whether) in the construction utrum...an (whether...or):
    Nescio quid intersit, utrum nunc veniam, an ad decem annos.
    I know not what matter it is, whether I come now or after ten years.

Derived terms

References

  • ăn in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • an in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.

Loniu

Noun

an

  1. fresh water

References

  • Malcolm Ross, Andrew Pawley, Meredith Osmond, The Lexicon of Proto-Oceanic →ISBN, 2007)
  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary (as ʔan)

Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German an, from Old Saxon an, ana, from Proto-Germanic *an, *ana.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -an
  • IPA(key): /an/, /aːn/, /ɒːn/, /ɔːn/

Preposition

an

  1. on
  2. to, at

Inflection

Neither the spelling nor grammar of these forms applies to all, or even necessarily the majority, of dialects.

Adverb

an

  1. on

See also

  • an't

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /an/, [ɑn]
  • Rhymes: -ɑn

Etymology 1

From Old High German indi.

Conjunction

an

  1. and

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *in.

Preposition

an

  1. in

Mandarin

Romanization

an

  1. Nonstandard spelling of ān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of án.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of ǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of àn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /an/

Preposition

an

  1. Alternative form of āne

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English in.

Preposition

an

  1. Alternative form of in

Etymology 2

From Old English and.

Conjunction

an

  1. Alternative form of and

Etymology 3

From Old English an.

Numeral

an

  1. Alternative form of oon

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French an, from Latin annus.

Noun

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

Descendants

  • French: an

Middle Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ən/

Determiner

an

  1. Alternative form of yn

Mirandese

Etymology

From Latin in.

Preposition

an

  1. in
  2. on

Mòcheno

Article

an

  1. oblique masculine of a

Derived terms

  • van

References

  • “an” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.

Norman

Etymology

From Old French an, from Latin annus.

Pronunciation

Noun

an m (plural ans)

  1. (Guernsey, Jersey) year

Synonyms

  • année

Derived terms

  • Jour dé l'An (New Year's Day)
  • Nouvel An (New Year)
  • tchu d'l'an (last day of the year)

Northern Kurdish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Conjunction

an

  1. or

Synonyms

  • yan (after a vowel-ending word)

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑːn/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːn
  • Hyphenation: an

Verb

an

  1. imperative of ane

Anagrams

  • Na, na

Novial

Preposition

an

  1. at, on, next to or contiguous with something

Occitan

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Occitan an, from Latin annus.

Noun

an m (plural ans)

  1. year

Usage notes

  • Also used with the verb aver (to have) to indicate age

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

an

  1. third-person plural present indicative of aver

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *ain.

Germanic cognates include Old Frisian ān, Old Saxon ēn, Old High German ein, Old Norse einn, Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (ains). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin ūnus, Ancient Greek οἶος (oîos), Old Irish oen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑːn/

Numeral

ān

  1. one
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Mark 14:37
    • early 12th century, the Peterborough Chronicle, year 1100
      On morgen æfter Hlāfmæssedæġe wearþ sē cyning Willelm on huntoþe fram his ānum menn mid āne flāne ofsċoten.
      On the morning after Lammas day, King William was out hunting when he was shot with an arrow by one of his servants.

Declension

Article

ān

  1. a; an (indefinite article)

Adjective

ān

  1. only
    • Durham Proverbs, no. 22
    • c. 995, Ælfric, Extracts on Grammar in English
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, John 5:18
  2. alone
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, "St. Benedict, Abbot"
    • c. 995, Ælfric, Extracts on Grammar in English

Usage notes

In the above senses ("only" and "alone"), this word was often used in the weak declension, often indeclinably as āna.

Declension

Noun

ān n

  1. one (digit or figure)

Declension

Derived terms

  • āngenġa
  • ānhaga
  • āntīd

Descendants

  • Middle English: an, oan, on, oon, a, o, oo
    • English: one, an, a, yan (dialectal)
    • Scots: ane, ae
    • Yola: oan

Old French

Etymology

From Latin annus.

Noun

an m (oblique plural anz, nominative singular anz, nominative plural an)

  1. year

Related terms

  • anee

Descendants

  • Middle French: an
    • French: an
  • Norman: an

Old Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈaːn/

Numeral

ān

  1. Alternative form of ēn

References

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old Irish

Pronoun

an (triggers eclipsis, takes a leniting relative clause)

  1. Alternative form of a
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 112b13

Verb

·an

  1. third-person singular preterite conjunct of anaid

an

  1. second-person singular imperative of anaid

Mutation


Old Occitan

Etymology

From Latin annus (year).

Noun

an m (oblique plural ans, nominative singular ans, nominative plural an)

  1. year

Descendants

  • Catalan: any
  • Occitan: an

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *an.

Preposition

an

  1. on, in

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin annus (year), from Proto-Italic *atnos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂et-no-, probably from *h₂et- (to go).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [an]

Noun

an m (plural ani)

  1. year

Declension

Derived terms

  • anual
  • anotimp

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) onn
  • (Sutsilvan, Vallader) on

Etymology

From Latin annus.

Noun

an m (plural ans)

  1. (Puter) year

Scots

Etymology 1

From Old English and, ond, end (and), from Proto-Germanic *andi, *anþi, *undi, *unþi (and, furthermore), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énti (facing opposite, near, in front of, before). Cognate with English and, North Frisian en (and), West Frisian en, in (and), Low German un (and), Dutch en (and), German und (and), Danish end (but), Swedish än (yet, but), Icelandic enn (still, yet), Albanian edhe (and) (dialectal ênde, ênne), ende (still, yet, therefore), Latin ante (opposite, in front of), and Ancient Greek ἀντί (antí, opposite, facing).

Alternative forms

  • an'
  • and

Pronunciation

  • (stressed) IPA(key): [ɑn]
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): [ən]

Conjunction

an

  1. and
Derived terms
  • an a'

Etymology 2

From Middle English oon, from Old English ān (one), from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos. Cognate to English an.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ən]

Article

an

  1. (before a vowel) a, an
Usage notes
  • In colloquial usage mostly replaced by a. However, still widely used in literature, probably due to English influence.
Synonyms
  • a

References

  • ^ https://dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/a_indef_art

  • Scottish Gaelic

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /an/, /ən/

    Etymology 1

    From Old Irish in.

    Article

    an

    1. the

    Declension

    Usage notes

    An is the most common singular form. The most common plural form is na.

    See also

    Etymology 2

    From Old Irish a.

    Pronoun

    an

    1. their
    Usage notes
    • This form of possessive pronoun is not used before nouns beginning with b, f, m or p, where am is used instead.

    Etymology 3

    From Old Irish i, from Proto-Celtic *en.

    Preposition

    an

    1. in
    Usage notes
    • This form is not used before nouns beginning with b, f, m or p, where ann am is used instead.
    Synonyms
    • ann an
    Derived terms
    • The following prepositional pronouns (or ‘conjugated prepositions’):

    References

    • “an” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
    • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “2 a”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
    • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “i”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
    • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “in”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

    Siraya

    Etymology

    From Proto-Austronesian *-an.

    Noun

    an

    1. place

    Swedish

    Etymology

    (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

    Adverb

    an

    1. used as a verb particle, similar to German preposition an (at, in, on, to)

    Related terms

    • gå an
    • komma an
    • lägga an
    • ta sig an

    Preposition

    an

    1. (accounting) to

    Anagrams

    • -na, na

    Torres Strait Creole

    Etymology

    From English hand.

    Noun

    an

    1. hand, lower arm
    2. flipper

    Turkish

    Etymology 1

    From Arabic آن(ʾān).

    Noun

    an (definite accusative anı, plural anlar)

    1. moment
    Declension

    See also

    • şu anda

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    an

    1. second-person singular imperative of anmak

    Vietnamese

    Etymology

    Sino-Vietnamese word from (tranquil).

    Pronunciation

    • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [ʔaːn˧˧]
    • (Huế) IPA(key): [ʔaːŋ˧˧]
    • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [ʔaːŋ˧˧]

    Adjective

    an

    1. (only in compounds) safe, secure

    Derived terms

    Further reading

    • "an" in Hồ Ngọc Đức, Free Vietnamese Dictionary Project (details)

    Vilamovian

    Pronunciation

    Conjunction

    an

    1. and

    Related terms

    • ana

    Numeral

    ān

    1. one

    Related terms

    • alf

    Source: wiktionary.org
    • the indefinite article.
      (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)