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Is as a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word as is a Scrabble US word. The word as is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

A1S1

Is as a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word as is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

A1S1

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Yes. The word as is a Words With Friends word. The word as is worth 2 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

A1S1

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2 letters words from 'as'

AS 2 

Definitions and meaning of as

as

Translingual

Symbol

as

  1. (metrology) Symbol for attosecond, an SI unit of time equal to 10−18 seconds.
  2. (metrology) arcsecond

Etymology 1

From Middle English as, als(a), alswa, from Old English eallswā (just so; as), thus representing a reduced form of also. Compare German Low German as, German als, Dutch als.

Pronunciation

  • (stressed) IPA(key): /æz/
  • Rhymes: -æz
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /əz/

Adverb

as (not comparable)

  1. To such an extent or degree; to the same extent or degree.
    • “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
  2. Considered to be, in relation to something else; in the relation (specified).
    • 1865, The Act of Suicide as Distinct from the Crime of Self-Murder: A Sermon
    • 1937, Tobias Matthay, On Colouring as Distinct from Tone-inflection: A Lecture (London: Oxford University Press)
  3. (dated) For example; for instance. (Compare such as.)
    • 1913, "Aboriginal", in Webster's Unabridged Dictionary:
      First; original; indigenous; primitive; native; as, the aboriginal tribes of America.
Derived terms
  • as I live and breathe
Translations

Conjunction

as

  1. In the (same) way or manner that; to the (same) degree that.
    • 2001, Jason Manning, Mountain Honor, Signet Book (→ISBN):
      "But he's good as dead, and I ain't about to waste a bullet."
    1. Used after so or as to introduce a comparison.
    2. Used to introduce a result: with the result that it is.
      • 1868, Proceedings and Debates of the [New York] Constitutional Convention Held in 1867 and 1868 in the City of Albany, page 2853:
        [...] that the Board of Regents had fallen into disrepute; that intelligent men inquired what the board was; he said that it was a quiet body, and kept out of the newspapers — and so quiet as to lead many to suppose tho board had ceased to exist.
      • 2006, Eric Manasse, The Twenty-First Man, iUniverse (→ISBN), page 7:
        It was a talent he had developed; he could actually be so quiet as to be practically invisible. In class, he was rarely called upon to answer any questions. In the crowded hallways, he could slip in and out without offending any of the local bullies ...
      • 2011, Herwig C. H. Hofmann, Gerard C. Rowe, Alexander H. Türk, Administrative Law and Policy of the European Union, Oxford University Press (→ISBN), page 507:
        Under most circumstances, it will be possible to draw a distinction sufficiently clear as to allow an unambiguous allocation to one or other category.
    3. Expressing concession: though.
      • 1843 (first published), Thomas Babington Macaulay, Essays
        We wish, however, to avail ourselves of the interest, transient as it may be, which this work has excited.
      • 2009, Matthew Friedman, Laurie B. Slone, J Friedman, After the War Zone (→ISBN):
        If this happens, be patient and, difficult as it may be, try not to take these reactions personally.
  2. At the time that; during the time when:
    1. At the same instant or moment that: when.
    2. At the same time that, during the same time when: while.
    3. Varying through time in the same proportion that.
  3. Being that, considering that, because, since.
  4. (dated) Introducing a comparison with a hypothetical state (+ subjunctive, or with the verb elided): as though, as if. [to 19th century]
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Fryar
      I start as from some dreadful dream.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts 2:
      And sodenly there cam a sounde from heven as it had bene the commynge off a myghty wynde []
    • c. 1616, William Shakespeare, King Henry VI part 2, First Folio 1623, I.1:
      Oft haue I seene the haughty Cardinall, / More like a Souldier then a man o'th' Church, / As stout and proud as he were Lord of all []
  5. Functioning as a relative conjunction, and sometimes like a relative pronoun: that, which, who. (See usage notes.) [from 14th c.]
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet:
      Now will he sit under a medlar tree,
      And wish his mistress were that kind of fruit,
      As maids call medlars, when they laugh alone.
    • 1854 Charles Dickens, Hard Times, Book I, Chapter II:
      ‘Sissy is not a name,’ said Mr. Gradgrind. ‘Don’t call yourself Sissy. Call yourself Cecilia.’
      ‘It’s father as calls me Sissy, sir,’ returned the young girl in a trembling voice, and with another curtsey.
    • 2016, Alan Moore, Jerusalem, Liveright 2016, page 99:
      “If I had, if I could hold me head up with the better folk, perhaps I'd think again, but I don't reckon as that's very likely now.”
  6. (rare, now England, Midland US and Southern US, possibly obsolete) Than.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church History of Britain
      The king was not more forward to bestow favours on them as they free to deal affronts to others their superiors.
Usage notes
  • Use of as as a relative conjunction meaning "that" dates to late Middle English and was formerly common in standard English, but is now only standard in constructions like "the same issue as she had" or "the identical issue as the appellant raised before"; otherwise, it is informal, found in the dialects of the Midland, Southern, Midwestern and Western US; and of Lancashire, Cheshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Warwickshire, Northamptonshire, Huntingdonshire, East Anglia, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, Berkshire, Bedfordshire, Essex, Somerset, Dorset, Wiltshire, Surrey, and Cornwall; sometimes in Durham, Westmorland, Yorkshire and Somerset; only rarely in Northumberland and Scotland; and only in certain set phrases in Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Devon.
Synonyms
  • (expressing concession): albeit, although; see also Thesaurus:even though
  • (at the same time that): while, whilst; see also Thesaurus:while
  • (being that): given that, seeing that; see also Thesaurus:because
Alternative forms
  • -'s (contracted form)
Translations

Preposition

as

  1. Introducing a basis of comparison, with an object in the objective case.
    • A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire.
  2. In the role of.
    • 2000, Tom Pendergast, Sara Pendergast, St. James encyclopedia of popular culture, volume 2, page 223:
      Directed by Howard Hawks, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes starred Marilyn Monroe as Lorelei and Jane Russell as Dorothy.
Usage notes
  • The object in older English may appear, and it may be prescribed as appearing, in the nominative case, similar to than, eg. You are not as tall as I. In modern everyday English, this may seem pedantic.
Translations

References

  • as at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • as in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin as. Doublet of ace.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈæs/
  • Homophone: ass

Noun

as (plural ases or asses)

  1. (unit of weight) A libra.
  2. Any of several coins of Rome, coined in bronze or later copper; or the equivalent value.
Translations
Further reading
  • As (Roman coin) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 3

a +‎ -s.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈeɪz/

Noun

as

  1. plural of a (compare with aes)
Usage notes
  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states on page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states in paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual on page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

See also

  • A's
  • a's

Etymology 4

Shortening of as hell or as fuck.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈæz/ (never unstressed)

Contraction

as

  1. (slang) As hell or as fuck; very much; extremely.
    You killed him? That's metal as, girl.

References

Anagrams

  • S&A, S. A., S.A., SA, Sa, s.a.

Achumawi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /(ʔ)ʌs/

Noun

as

  1. water

References

  • Bruce E. Nevin, Aspects of Pit River phonology (1998) (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Linguistics)

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /as/

Etymology 1

From Dutch as, from Proto-Germanic *askǭ.

Noun

as (plural asse, diminutive assie)

  1. ash
  2. ashes

Etymology 2

From Dutch as, from Proto-Germanic *ahsō.

Noun

as (plural asse, diminutive assie)

  1. axle
  2. axis

Etymology 3

From Dutch als

Conjunction

as

  1. if
  2. when

Preposition

as

  1. like

Aragonese

Etymology

From Latin illās.

Article

as pl

  1. the

Usage notes

The form las, either pronounced as las or as ras, can be found after words ending with -a.


Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈas/
  • Rhymes: -as

Etymology 1

From Latin as (basic Roman unit of money).

Noun

as m (plural asos)

  1. (games) An ace. (the side of a die with a single pip)
  2. (card games) An ace. (a card with a single pip, usually of highest rank in a suit)
  3. (figurative, sports) An ace. (an expert)
  4. (historical, metrology) An as or a libra. (Roman unit of weight)
  5. (historical, numismatics) An as (Roman unit of money).
Derived terms
  • as de guia (bowline knot)
  • sempre un sis o un as (a handicap or a problem)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse áss, singular of æsir (the Norse gods).

Noun

as m (plural asos)

  1. (mythology) One of the Æsir.

Etymology 3

Contraction

as

  1. (dialectal) Contraction of the preposition a with the salty article es.
Synonyms
  • al (contraction of a and el)

Etymology 4

Noun

as

  1. plural of a

Cimbrian

Etymology

Confer German als, English as. (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Conjunction

as

  1. (Sette Comuni) if

References

  • “as” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse áss (pl æsir).

Noun

as c (singular definite asen, plural indefinite aser)

  1. one of the Æsir

Inflection

Noun

as n (singular definite asset, plural indefinite asser)

  1. A-flat (A♭)

Inflection

Verb

as

  1. imperative of ase

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑs/
  • Hyphenation: as
  • Rhymes: -ɑs

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch asche, from Old Dutch *aska, from Proto-Germanic *askǭ.

Cognate with Low German Asch, German Asche, English ash, West Frisian jiske, Danish aske, Swedish aska.

Noun

as f (plural assen, diminutive asje n)

  1. ash
  2. ashes
Alternative forms
  • asch (obsolete)
  • asse
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch asse, from Old Dutch *assa, from Proto-Germanic *ahsō.

Noun

as f (plural assen, diminutive asje n)

  1. axis
  2. axle

Descendants

  • Indonesian: as

Etymology 3

Conjunction

as

  1. (The Hague dialect) Alternative spelling of als

Preposition

as

  1. (The Hague dialect) Alternative spelling of als
  2. (The Hague dialect) eive ... as: as ... as

Fala

Etymology

From Old Portuguese as, from Latin illās.

Article

as f pl (singular a, masculine o, masculine plural os)

  1. feminine plural of o

Finnish

Etymology

From German As (German key notation).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑs/, [ˈɑs̠]
  • Rhymes: -ɑs
  • Syllabification: as

Noun

as

  1. (music) A-flat

Usage notes

Capitalized for the great octave or any octave below that, or in names of major keys; not capitalized for the small octave or any octave above that, or in names of minor keys.

Declension

Compounds

  • as-aiolinen
  • as-doorinen
  • As-duuri
  • as-fryyginen
  • As-jooninen
  • as-lokrinen
  • As-lyydinen
  • As-miksolyydinen
  • as-molli

Anagrams

  • sa

French

Etymology 1

From Latin as.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑs/
  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

as m (plural as)

  1. ace (card of value 1)
  2. ace (expert or pilot)
  3. as (Roman coin)
Descendants
  • German: As, Ass
    • Hungarian: ász
  • Vietnamese: át

See also

Etymology 2

From the verb avoir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ/

Verb

as

  1. second-person singular present indicative of avoir

Anagrams

  • sa

Further reading

  • “as” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin axis.

Noun

as m

  1. axis
  2. board

Galician

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese as, from Latin illās, accusative feminine plural of ille (that).

Article

as f pl (feminine singular a, masculine singular o, masculine plural os)

  1. (definite) the
Usage notes

The definite article o (in all its forms) regularly forms contractions when it follows the prepositions a (to), con (with), de (of, from), and en (in). For example, con as ("with the") contracts to coas, and en as ("in the") contracts to nas.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronoun

as

  1. accusative of elas

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aːs/
  • Rhymes: -aːs

Noun

as n

  1. (music) A flat

Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈas]
  • Hyphenation: as

Etymology 1

From Dutch as (axis, axle), from Middle Dutch asse, from Old Dutch *assa, from Proto-Germanic *ahsō.

Noun

as (plural, first-person possessive asku, second-person possessive asmu, third-person possessive asnya)

  1. axis, axle
    Synonym: sumbu

Etymology 2

From Dutch aas (ace), earlier ase, from Middle Dutch aes, from Old French as, from Latin as. Semantic loan from English ace for meaning other than card with a single spot.

Noun

as (plural, first-person possessive asku, second-person possessive asmu, third-person possessive asnya)

  1. ace,
    1. card with a single spot.
    2. (tennis) point scored without the opponent hitting the ball.
    3. (golf) a hole in one.

Further reading

  • “as” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Irish

Etymology 1

From Old Irish ass, a (out of) (compare Scottish Gaelic à), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eǵʰs (compare Latin ex).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /asˠ/
  • (Munster) IPA(key): /ɑsˠ/
  • (Aran) IPA(key): /æsˠ/ (as if spelled eas)

Preposition

as (plus dative, triggers no mutation)

  1. out of
  2. from (a place)
  3. off
Inflection
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Irish ass.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /asˠ/
  • (Munster) IPA(key): /ɑsˠ/
  • (Aran) IPA(key): /æsˠ/ (as if spelled eas)

Pronoun

as (emphatic as-san)

  1. third-person masculine singular of as (from, off, out of)
Derived terms
  • as féin (alone)

Adverb

as

  1. off (in or into a state of non-operation or non-existence: of a machine, light, etc.)
  2. out (in or into a state of non-operation or non-existence: of a fire, etc.)
Derived terms

Etymology 3

Old Irish as (shoe, slipper)

Noun

as m (genitive singular asa, nominative plural asa)

  1. (literary) shoe
Declension

Etymology 4

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

as m (genitive singular asa)

  1. (literary) milk
Declension

Mutation

Further reading

  • "as" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “7 a (‘out of’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “as (‘milk’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “as (‘shoe’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Finck, F. N. (1899), Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. I, p. 195.
  • M. L. Sjoestedt-Jonval (1938), Description d’un parler irlandais de Kerry, Paris: Librairie Ancienne Honoré Champion, p. 95.
  • Entries containing “as” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Latgalian

Etymology

From Proto-Baltic *ež, from Proto-Indo-European *eǵ (from *éǵh₂). Akin to Latvian es.

Pronoun

as

  1. I

Declension


Latin

Alternative forms

  • 𐆚 (symbol)

Etymology

From Old Latin *ass, probably from Etruscan. Libra and nummus were also loanwords.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /as/
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /as/

Noun

as m (genitive assis); third declension

  1. An as; a Roman coin originally made of bronze and weighing a pound, but later made of copper and weighing half an ounce.

Usage notes

It is especially significant as being the coin of least value in the Classical age; as such it was often used in poetry as representative of the idea of worthlessness - one example being in Vivamus atque amemus, where Catullus mentions "valuing opinions of old men at a single as". 2 and a half asses equalled a single sesterce.

Declension

  • The genitive plural is normally assium, but assum is found in Varro.

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Derived terms

  • decussis
  • sēmis

Descendants

  • Catalan: as
  • Old French: as
    • Middle French: as
      • French: as (see there for further descendants)
    • Middle Dutch: aes
      • Dutch: aas
        • Afrikaans: aas
    • Middle English: as
      • English: ace (see there for further descendants)
      • Scots: ace
  • Portuguese: ás, asse
  • Spanish: as
  • English: as
  • Polish: as

References

  • as in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • as in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • as in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • as in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • as in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • as in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish ocus (and", originally "proximity), from Proto-Celtic *onkus-tus, from *onkus (near).

Conjunction

as

  1. and

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “2 ocus”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Middle English

Etymology 1

Reduction of alswo, alswa, also, from Old English eallswā. The reduced form is more common in this sense from c. 1200.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /as/

Conjunction

as

  1. as
Alternative forms
  • ase, os
Descendants
  • English: as
  • Scots: as

References

  • “as, conj.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From Old French as (ace), from Latin as, assis (as (Roman coin)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aːs/

Noun

as

  1. (dice games) ace (single spot on a die)
  2. (dice games) The lowest possible throw in dice.
  3. (figurative, by extension) bad luck
Descendants
  • English: ace (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: ace

References

  • “ās, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Movima

Verb

as

  1. to sit

Further reading

  • http://webdoc.ubn.ru.nl/mono/h/haude_k/gramofmo.pdf
  • http://www.ioling.org/booklets/iol-2007-indiv-prob.en.pdf

Navajo

Alternative forms

  • is

Interjection

as

  1. oh: expressing surprise

Norman

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

as m (plural as)

  1. (Jersey, card games) ace

Etymology 2

Verb

as

  1. (Guernsey) second-person singular present indicative of aver

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From asa (to swell) and asa (to struggle).

Noun

as n (definite singular aset, indefinite plural as, definite plural asa)

  1. fermentation
  2. unrest, noice

Verb

as

  1. imperative of asa and ase

References

  • “as” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Occitan

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /as/

Verb

as

  1. second-person singular present indicative of aver

Old French

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

as m (oblique plural as, nominative singular as, nominative plural as)

  1. a score of one on a die
Descendants
  • Middle French: as
    • French: as (see there for further descendants)
  • Middle Dutch: aes
    • Dutch: aas
      • Afrikaans: aas
  • Middle English: as
    • English: ace (see there for further descendants)
    • Scots: ace

Etymology 2

Contraction

as

  1. Alternative form of als ("to the")

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

as

  1. second-person singular present indicative of avoir

Old Irish

Verb

as (triggers lenition in a direct relative clause and eclipsis in an indirect relative clause)

  1. third-person singular present indicative relative of is

Pronoun

as

  1. third-person singular masculine of a (out of)

Alternative forms

  • ass
  • es

Old Prussian

Pronoun

as (plural mes)

  1. I, the first-person singular pronoun

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ansuz (god, deity).

Noun

ās m (declension unknown)

  1. god
  2. the runic character (/a/ or /aː/)

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

Compare German als, Dutch als, English as.

Conjunction

as

  1. as
    As ich des Poscht schreib...
    As I write this post...
  2. than
  3. but

Pronoun

as

  1. (relative) which
  2. (relative) who
    Leit as nix zu duh hen
    People who have nothing to do

Polish

Etymology

From French as, from Latin as, from Old Latin *ass, probably from Etruscan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /as/

Noun

as m anim

  1. (card games) ace

Declension

Noun

as m pers

  1. ace (skilled pilot)

Declension

Further reading

  • as in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Portuguese as, from Latin illās (with an initial l having disappeared; compare Spanish las).

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ɐʃ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /as/
    • Homophones: ás, às, hás, az
  • Hyphenation: as

Article

as

  1. feminine plural of o

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:o.

See also

Pronoun

as f pl

  1. (third person personal) them (as a direct object; the corresponding indirect object is lhes; the form used after prepositions is elas).

Usage notes

  • As becomes -las after verb forms ending in -r, -s, or -z, the pronouns nos and vos, and the adverb eis; the ending letter causing the change disappears.
    After ver:
    After pôr:
    After fiz:
    After nos:
    After eis:
  • Becomes -nas after a nasal diphthong: -ão, -am [ɐ̃w̃], -õe [õj̃], -em, -êm [ẽj̃].
  • In Brazil it is being abandoned in favor of the nominative form elas.
    Eu as vi.Eu vi elas. = "I saw them.

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:as.

Synonyms

  • las, nas

See also

Noun

as m

  1. plural of a

Saterland Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian as, ase, asa, als, alse, alsa, equivalent to al +‎ so. More at as.

Adverb

as

  1. as

Conjunction

as

  1. as

Scottish Gaelic

Particle

as

  1. Creates the superlative when preceding the comparative form of an adjective or an adverb.
    glic (wise)as glice (wisest)
    mòr (big)as motha (biggest)

Usage notes

  • Only used in the present and future tenses. In the past tense and the conditional mood, a bu and a b' are used.
  • Lenites initial f if followed by a vowel:
    fuar → as fhuaire

Related terms

  • nas

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

Borrowed from German As, from Latin as (as, copper coin).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /âs/

Noun

ȁs m (Cyrillic spelling а̏с)

  1. (card games, sports) ace

Declension

See also


Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /áːs/

Noun

ȃs m anim

  1. (card games) An ace; in a game of cards.
  2. An ace; somebody very proficient at an activity.

Inflection

See also


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin as.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /as/
  • Homophones: has, haz (non-Castilian)

Noun

as m (plural ases)

  1. (card games) an ace (in a game of cards)
  2. an ace, a hotshot (somebody very proficient at an activity)
  3. an as (a Roman coin).

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “as” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German âs.

Noun

as n

  1. Carrion, carcass (of an animal killed by a predator).
  2. (slang, derogatory) An inconsiderate or otherwise contemptible person.
Declension
Derived terms
  • asätare

Etymology 2

From Old Norse áss.

Noun

as c

  1. One of the Æsir, a Norse God.
Declension
Synonyms
  • asagud

Anagrams

  • sa

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English arse.

Noun

as

  1. buttocks, backside
  2. bottom, base
  3. reason, meaning, motivation
  4. beginning, source

Derived terms


Turkish

Etymology 1

From Ottoman Turkish آص(as), from Proto-Turkic *argun, *āŕ.

Noun

as (definite accusative ası, plural aslar)

  1. ermine
    Synonyms: kakım, ermin
  2. (dialectal) weasel

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French as. Note that in Ottoman Turkish until its end – though it be that playing cards had been introduced in Turkey by Europeans and French in particular – the card was called بك(bey). Apparently this usage switch is a function of the Law on the Abolishment of Nicknames and Titles from the 26th of November 1934 (Lâkap ve Unvanların Kaldırılması Hakkındaki Kanun).

Noun

as (definite accusative ası, plural aslar)

  1. (card games) ace
Coordinate terms

Etymology 3

Verb

as

  1. second-person singular imperative of asmak

Volapük

Preposition

as (ays, äs)

  1. as

Wagi

Noun

as

  1. woman

Further reading

  • J. Spencer, S. van Cott, B. MacKenzie, G. Muñoz, A Sociolinguistic Survey of the Wagi [fad] Language

West Frisian

Etymology 1

From Old Frisian as, ase, asa, als, alse, alsa, equivalent to al +‎ so. More at as.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/, /as/

Conjunction

as

  1. if, provided that
  2. as, like (used to form an equating phrase)
  3. than
Further reading
  • “as (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2

From Old Frisian *ax, from Proto-Germanic *ahsō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/

Noun

as c (plural assen, diminutive aske)

  1. axis
  2. axle (of a car)
Further reading
  • “as (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Wolof

Article

as

  1. a small (singular diminutive indefinite article)

Usage notes

Precedes the noun.


Source: wiktionary.org
  • a Norse god living in Asgard.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)