At in Scrabble Dictionary

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Is at a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word at is a Scrabble US word. The word at is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

A1T1

Is at a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word at is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

A1T1

Is at a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word at is a Words With Friends word. The word at is worth 2 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

A1T1

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You can make 2 words from 'at' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


2 letters words from 'at'

AT 2TA 2

Definitions and meaning of at

at

Pronunciation

  • (stressed) enPR: ăt, IPA(key): /æt/
    • Rhymes: -æt
    • Homophone: @
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /ət/
    • Homophone: it (unstressed; only in some accents)

Etymology 1

From Middle English at, from Old English æt (at, near, by, toward), from Proto-Germanic *at (at, near, to), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd (near, at). Cognate with Scots at (at), North Frisian äät, äit, et, it (at), Danish at (to), Swedish åt (for, toward), Norwegian åt (to), Faroese at (at, to, toward), Icelandic (to, towards), Gothic 𐌰𐍄 (at, at), Latin ad (to, near).

Preposition

at

  1. In, near, or in the general vicinity of a particular place.
    • “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
    • 1919, Plutarch, Parallel Lives, "The Life of Cicero", 43 (Bernadotte Perrin, trans.)
      "Hirtius and Pansa, who were good men and admirers of Cicero, begged him not to desert them, and undertook to put down Antony if Cicero would remain at Rome."
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Today my friend Marsha is at her friend's house.
  2. (indicating time) Indicating occurrence in an instant of time or a period of time relatively short in context or from the speaker's perspective.
    • 1838, The Family Magazine
      Lafayette was major-general in the American army at the age of 18 []
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Hi, Anne. Are you busy? — Hi, Anna. Yes. At 10 a.m. I am writing.
  3. In the direction of (often in an unfocused or uncaring manner).
    • “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
  4. Denotes a price.
  5. Occupied in (activity).
  6. In a state of.
  7. Indicates a position on a scale or in a series.
  8. Because of.
  9. Indicates a means, method, or manner.
  10. Holding a given speed or rate.
  11. (used for skills (including in activities) or areas of knowledge) On the subject of; regarding.
    • 2015, Sanyan Stories: Favorites from a Ming Dynasty Collection →ISBN, page 157:
      She's good at playing musical instruments, singing and dancing, chess, calligraphy, and painting.
  12. (Ireland, stressed pronunciation) Bothering, irritating, causing discomfort to
    • 1995 Keith Wood, quoted in David Hughes, "Wood odds-on to take one against the head", in The Independent (London) 18 January:
      I think `Jesus, my back is at me'. Then I get the ball. Off you go for 10 yards and you don't feel a thing. Then you stop and think: `Jesus, it's at me again'[.]
    • 2014 Marian Keyes "Antarctic Diary - Part 2" personal website (January 2014):
      He seems to be saying. “Ah, go on, you’re making the other lads feel bad.” But the 4th fella says, “No. Don’t be ‘at’ me. I’m just not in the form right now, I’ll stay where I am, thanks.”
Usage notes
  • He threw the ball to me — (so I could catch it).
  • He threw the ball at me — (trying to hit me with it).
  • He talked to her — (conversationally).
  • He shouted at her — (aggressively).
Translations

Noun

at (plural ats)

  1. The at sign (@).
Translations

Etymology 2

Pronoun

at

  1. (Northern England, rare, possibly obsolete) Alternative form of 'at (relative pronoun; reduced form of "that")
    • 1860, Robert Gordon Latham, Song of Solomon, as spoken in Durham [by Thomas Moore], in A hand-book of the English language:
      Tak us t' foxes, t' little foxes at spoils t' veynes: fer our veynes hev tender grapes.

Etymology 3

Noun

at (plural ats or at)

  1. Alternative form of att (Laos currency unit)

Anagrams

  • T&A, T.A., T/A, TA, ta

Azerbaijani

Etymology

From Proto-Turkic *at (horse).

Noun

at (definite accusative atı, plural atlar)

  1. horse
  2. (chess) knight

Declension

See also

References


Chuukese

Noun

at

  1. boy

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse at, cf. Swedish att, Norwegian Bokmål at. Probably from Proto-Germanic *þat, a pronoun used as a conjunction, cf. English that and German dass.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ad̥], [a]

Conjunction

at

  1. that

Etymology 2

From Old Norse at, cf. Swedish att, Norwegian Bokmål å. Originally the samme word as the preposition Old Norse at (at, to), Proto-Germanic *at (= Danish ad). In the West Germanic languages, a different preposition, Proto-Germanic *tō (to), serves as the infinitive marker: English to and German zu.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ad̥], [a], [ʌ]

Homophone: og

Particle

at

  1. to (infinitive-marker)

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Verb

at

  1. singular past indicative of eten
  2. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of atten
  3. imperative of atten

Eastern Durango Nahuatl

Noun

at

  1. water

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛaːʰt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛaːʰt
  • Homophone: æt

Etymology 1

From Old Norse at.

Preposition

at

  1. (with dative) at, towards, to

Etymology 2

From Old Norse at (that), from Proto-Germanic *þat (that). Cognate with Middle English at (that, conjunction and relative pronoun), Scots at (that, conjunction and relative pronoun). More at that.

Conjunction

at

  1. that

Etymology 3

From Old Norse at (at, to), from Proto-Germanic *at (at, to). More at at.

Particle

at

  1. to A particle used to mark the following verb as an infinitive.

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin actus; cf. Italian atto.

Noun

at m (plural ats)

  1. act, action, deed

Related terms

  • azion

Gothic

Romanization

at

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍄

Icelandic

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aːt/
  • Rhymes: -aːt

Noun

at n (genitive singular ats, nominative plural öt)

  1. fight

Declension


Irish

Pronunciation

  • (Munster, Aran) IPA(key): /ɑt̪ˠ/
  • (Connemara, Mayo, Ulster) IPA(key): /at̪ˠ/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Noun

at m (genitive singular as substantive ait, genitive as verbal noun ata, nominative plural atanna)

  1. swelling
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      at ə l̄āv m inīnə.
      conventional orthography: at i lámh m’iníne.
      My daughter has a swelling on her hand.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      tā šȧxt n-at i n-ə wunāl.
      conventional orthography: Tá seacht n-at ina mhuineál.
      He has seven swellings on his neck.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      kiŕ də lāv ə n̄-isḱə leš n̥ t-at ə wȳlū.
      conventional orthography: Cuir do lámh in uisce leis an t-at a maolú.
      Put your hand in water to reduce the swelling.
  2. verbal noun of at
Declension

Etymology 2

From Old Irish attaid (swells, dilates, increases, verb), from att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Verb

at (present analytic atann, future analytic atfaidh, verbal noun at, past participle ata)

  1. (intransitive) swell
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      tā ə h-ēdn̥ atī.
      conventional orthography: Tá a héadan ataithe.
      Her face is swollen.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      tā mə lāv atī.
      conventional orthography: Tá mo lámh ataithe.
      My hand is swollen.
    Synonym: borr
  2. (intransitive) bloat
  3. (intransitive, of sea) heave
Conjugation
  • Alternative past participle: ataithe

Mutation

Further reading

  • "at" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “att”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “attaid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • “at” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 42.
  • “ataim” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • Entries containing “at” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin actus.

Noun

at m (plural ac)

  1. act
  2. action
  3. work

Latin

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /at/, [at̪]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /at/, [at̪]

Conjunction

at

  1. but, yet
  2. whereas

Synonyms

  • ast
  • sed
  • tamen (postpositive)

Derived terms

  • atquī

References

  • at in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • at in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • at in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • at in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)

Livonian

Alternative forms

  • attõ, āt, ātõ

Verb

at

  1. 3rd person plural present indicative form of vȱlda

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English æt.

Preposition

at

  1. at
Alternative forms
  • et, ed
Descendants
  • English: at
  • Scots: at

References

  • “at, prep.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From Old Norse at.

Particle

at

  1. (Northern, northern East Midlands) to (infinitive-marker)

References

  • “at, adv.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Min Nan


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse at. Cognate with Danish at and Swedish att.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /at/, [ɑt]

Conjunction

at

  1. that

References

“at” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse at. Cognate with Danish at and Swedish att.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑtː/
  • Homophone: att

Conjunction

at

  1. that

References

“at” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • it (second-person singular)
  • ata (third-person plural relative)

Pronunciation

  • (second-person singular): IPA(key): /at/
  • (third-person plural relative): IPA(key): /ad/

Verb

at

  1. inflection of is:
    1. second-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person plural present indicative relative

Old Norse

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *atǭ. Related to Old English etja.

Noun

at n (genitive ats, plural ǫt)

  1. conflict, fight, battle
Declension
Descendants
  • Icelandic: at

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *þat (that). Cognate with Old English þæt, Gothic 𐌸𐌰𐍄𐌰 (þata).

Conjunction

at

  1. that
  2. since, because, as
Descendants

Etymology 3

From Proto-Germanic *at (at, to). Cognate with Old English æt, Old Frisian et, Old Saxon at, Old High German az, Gothic 𐌰𐍄 (at).

Particle

at

  1. to (infinitive particle)
Descendants

Preposition

at

  1. at, to
Descendants

References

  • at in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • at in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • at in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • at in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)

Pipil

Etymology

From Proto-Nahuan *aatl, from Proto-Uto-Aztecan *pa-ta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aːt/

Noun

āt (plural ajāt)

  1. water

Pochutec

Etymology

From Proto-Nahuan *aatl, from Proto-Uto-Aztecan *pa-ta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈat/

Noun

at

  1. water

References

  • Boas, Franz (July 1917), “El Dialecto mexicano de Pochutla, Oaxaca”, in International Journal of American Linguistics (in Spanish), volume 1, issue 1, DOI:10.1086/463709, JSTOR 1263398, pages 9–44
  • Knab, Tim (July 1980), “When is a language really dead: The case of Pochutec”, in International Journal of American Linguistics, volume 46, issue 3, DOI:10.1086/465658, JSTOR 1264741, pages 230–233

Scots

Preposition

at

  1. at

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology 1

From Old Irish att.

Noun

at m

  1. swelling, tumour
  2. protuberance, prominence
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Irish attaid (swells, dilates, increases, verb), from att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Verb

at (past dh'at, future ataidh, verbal noun at or atadh, past participle athte)

  1. swell, fester, puff up, become tumid

Mutation

Further reading

  • “at” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “att”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “attaid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Selaru

Etymology

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral

at

  1. four

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish آت(at).

Noun

at m (Cyrillic spelling ат)

  1. steed
  2. Arabian (horse)

Declension

Derived terms


Simeulue

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral

at

  1. four

Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /at/

Conjunction

at

  1. and
    Synonym: saka

See also

  • at saka
  • t'saka

Tocharian B

Etymology

An apocopated form of ate (id)

Adverb

at

  1. away

Further reading

  • Adams, Douglas Q. (2013), “at”, in A Dictionary of Tocharian B: Revised and Greatly Enlarged (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 10), Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 9

Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From English heart.

Noun

at

  1. heart

Turkish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ät̪/

Etymology 1

From Ottoman Turkish آت(at, horse), from Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse). Cognate with Karakhanid اَتْ(at, horse), Old Turkic 𐱃(at, horse).

Noun

at (definite accusative atı, plural atlar)

  1. (zoology) horse
  2. (chess) knight
Declension
Related terms

Etymology 2

Verb

at

  1. second-person singular imperative of atmak

Further reading

  • at in Turkish dictionaries at Türk Dil Kurumu

Turkmen

Etymology 1

From Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /at/

Noun

at (definite accusative ady, plural atlar)

  1. horse
Declension

Etymology 2

From Proto-Turkic *āt (name). Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰀𐱃(āt, name), Chuvash ят (jat, name), Turkish ad.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aːt/

Noun

at (definite accusative ady, plural atlar)

  1. name
Declension

Volapük

Determiner

at

  1. (demonstrative) this

Wakhi

Etymology

Cognate with Yagnobi ашт.

Numeral

at

  1. eight

Welsh

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /at/

Preposition

at

  1. to, towards
  2. for
  3. at
  4. by

Usage notes

This preposition causes the soft mutation.

Inflection


West Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔt/

Conjunction

at

  1. if
    Synonym: as

Further reading

  • “at”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Wolof

Pronunciation

Noun

at

  1. year

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a monetary unit of Laos.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)