Bolt in Scrabble Dictionary

What does bolt mean? Is bolt a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is bolt worth? bolt how many points in Words With Friends? What does bolt mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for bolt

See how to calculate how many points for bolt.

Is bolt a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word bolt is a Scrabble US word. The word bolt is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

B3O1L1T1

Is bolt a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word bolt is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

B3O1L1T1

Is bolt a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word bolt is a Words With Friends word. The word bolt is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

B4O1L2T1

Our tools

Valid words made from Bolt

You can make 9 words from 'bolt' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'bolt'

BLOT 6BOLT 6

3 letters words from 'bolt'

BOT 5LOB 5
LOT 3 

2 letters words from 'bolt'

BO 4LO 2
OB 4TO 2

All 4 letters words made out of bolt

bolt oblt blot lbot olbt lobt botl obtl btol tbol otbl tobl blto lbto btlo tblo ltbo tlbo oltb lotb otlb tolb ltob tlob

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word bolt. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in bolt.

Definitions and meaning of bolt

bolt

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɒlt/, /bəʊlt/, /bɔʊlt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /boʊlt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊlt, -ɒlt

Etymology 1

From Middle English bolt, from Old English bolt, from Proto-Germanic *bultaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeld- (to knock, strike). Compare Lithuanian beldu (I knock), baldas (pole for striking). Akin to Dutch and West Frisian bout, German Bolz or Bolzen, Danish bolt, Swedish bult, Icelandic bolti.

Noun

bolt (plural bolts)

  1. A (usually) metal fastener consisting of a cylindrical body that is threaded, with a larger head on one end. It can be inserted into an unthreaded hole up to the head, with a nut then threaded on the other end; a heavy machine screw.
  2. A sliding pin or bar in a lock or latch mechanism.
  3. A bar of wood or metal dropped in horizontal hooks on a door and adjoining wall or between the two sides of a double door, to prevent the door(s) from being forced open.
  4. (military, mechanical engineering) A sliding mechanism to chamber and unchamber a cartridge in a firearm.
  5. A small personal-armour-piercing missile for short-range use, or (in common usage though deprecated by experts) a short arrow, intended to be shot from a crossbow or a catapult.
  6. A lightning spark, i.e., a lightning bolt.
  7. A sudden event, action or emotion.
    The problem's solution struck him like a bolt from the blue.
    • 1994, Stephen Fry, The Hippopotamus Chapter 2
      With a bolt of fright he remembered that there was no bathroom in the Hobhouse Room. He leapt along the corridor in a panic, stopping by the long-case clock at the end where he flattened himself against the wall.
  8. A large roll of fabric or similar material, as a bolt of cloth.
    1. (nautical) The standard linear measurement of canvas for use at sea: 39 yards.
    • 24 March 1774 - Newspaper: Stamford Mercury - "Mr. Cole, Basket-maker...has lost near 300 boults of rods" https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000254/17740324/001/0001
  9. A sudden spring or start; a sudden leap aside.
    The horse made a bolt.
  10. A sudden flight, as to escape creditors.
    • (Can we date this quote by Compton Reade and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      This gentleman was so hopelessly involved that he contemplated a bolt to America — or anywhere.
  11. (US, politics) A refusal to support a nomination made by the party with which one has been connected; a breaking away from one's party.
  12. An iron to fasten the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter.
    • 1594, Christopher Marlowe, Edward II, London: William Jones,[1]
      He shall to prison, and there die in boults.
    • c. 1604, William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure, Act V, Scene 1,[2]
      Away with him to prison! Lay bolts enough upon him:
  13. A burst of speed or efficiency.
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • arrow
  • dart
  • nut
  • screw

Verb

bolt (third-person singular simple present bolts, present participle bolting, simple past and past participle bolted)

  1. To connect or assemble pieces using a bolt.
  2. To secure a door by locking or barring it.
  3. (intransitive) To flee, to depart, to accelerate suddenly.
    • (Can we date this quote by Drayton and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      This Puck seems but a dreaming dolt, [] / And oft out of a bush doth bolt.
  4. (transitive) To cause to start or spring forth; to dislodge (an animal being hunted).
  5. To strike or fall suddenly like a bolt.
  6. (intransitive) To escape.
  7. (intransitive, botany) Of a plant, to grow quickly; to go to seed.
  8. To swallow food without chewing it.
  9. To drink one's drink very quickly; to down a drink.
  10. (US, politics) To refuse to support a nomination made by a party or caucus with which one has been connected; to break away from a party.
  11. To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out.
Translations

Adverb

bolt (not comparable)

  1. Suddenly; straight; unbendingly.
    The soldiers stood bolt upright for inspection.
    • (Can we date this quote by Thackeray and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      [He] came bolt up against the heavy dragoon.

References

Etymology 2

From Middle English bulten, from Anglo-Norman buleter, Old French bulter (modern French bluter), from a Germanic source originally meaning "bag, pouch" cognate with Middle High German biuteln (to sift), from Proto-Germanic *buzdô (beetle, grub, swelling), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūs- (to move quickly). Cognate with Dutch buidel.

Verb

bolt (third-person singular simple present bolts, present participle bolting, simple past and past participle bolted)

  1. To sift, especially through a cloth.
  2. To sift the bran and germ from wheat flour.
    Graham flour is unbolted flour.
  3. To separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means.
    • (Can we date this quote by L'Estrange and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Time and nature will bolt out the truth of things.
  4. (law) To discuss or argue privately, and for practice, as cases at law.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jacob to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • unbolted

Noun

bolt (plural bolts)

  1. A sieve, especially a long fine sieve used in milling for bolting flour and meal; a bolter.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)

Anagrams

  • blot, blót

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥ʌlˀd̥]
  • Homophone: bold

Etymology 1

From Low German bolt

Noun

bolt c (singular definite bolten, plural indefinite bolte)

  1. a bolt (threaded)
Derived terms
  • bolte (verb)
Related terms
  • skrue (screw or bolt)

Etymology 2

Verb

bolt (imperative bolt, present tense bolter, passive boltes, simple past and past participle bolta or boltet, present participle boltende)

  1. imperative of bolte

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian volta (vault).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ ˈbolt]
  • Rhymes: -olt

Noun

bolt (plural boltok)

  1. shop, store (especially applied to relatively small shops in the countryside)
    Synonyms: üzlet, áruház, kereskedés, árus
  2. vault
    Synonyms: boltozat, boltív, bolthajtás

Declension

Hyponyms

See also the compound words containing -bolt with the sense of a shop [store] below.

Derived terms

  • bolti
  • boltos
  • boltozat

(Note: Most compounds with üzlet as an affix in the sense of ’shop, store’ can be expressed with bolt.)


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Low German bolt

Noun

bolt m (definite singular bolten, indefinite plural bolter, definite plural boltene)

  1. a bolt (threaded)
Derived terms
  • bolte (verb)
Related terms
  • skrue (screw or bolt)

Etymology 2

Verb

bolt

  1. imperative of bolte

References

  • “bolt” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Norwegian boltr, from Middle Low German bolte.

Noun

bolt m (definite singular bolten, indefinite plural boltar, definite plural boltane)

  1. a bolt (threaded)

Derived terms

  • bolte (verb)

Related terms

  • skrue (screw or bolt)

References

  • “bolt” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *bultaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeld- (to knock, strike). Compare Lithuanian beldu (I knock), baldas (pole for striking). Akin to Dutch bout, German Bolz or Bolzen, Danish bolt, Icelandic bolti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bolt/, [boɫt]

Noun

bolt m

  1. bolt

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: bolt
    • English: bolt

References


Source: wiktionary.org
  • to run away.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)