But in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does but mean? Is but a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is but worth? but how many points in Words With Friends? What does but mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for but

See how to calculate how many points for but.

Is but a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word but is a Scrabble US word. The word but is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

B3U1T1

Is but a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word but is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

B3U1T1

Is but a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word but is a Words With Friends word. The word but is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

B4U2T1

Our tools

Valid words made from But

You can make 3 words from 'but' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

3 letters words from 'but'

BUT 5TUB 5

2 letters words from 'but'

UT 2 

All 3 letters words made out of but

but ubt btu tbu utb tub

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word but. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in but.

Definitions and meaning of but

but

Etymology

From Middle English but, buten, boute, bouten, from Old English būtan (without, outside of, except, only), equivalent to be- +‎ out. Cognate with Scots but, bot (outside, without, but), Saterland Frisian buute (without), West Frisian bûten (outside of, apart from, other than, except, but), Dutch buiten (outside), Dutch Low Saxon buten (outside), German Low German buuten, buute (outside), obsolete German baußen (outside), Luxembourgish baussen. Compare bin, about.

Eclipsed non-native Middle English mes (but) borrowed from Old French mes, mais (> French mais (but)).

Pronunciation

  • (stressed, UK) IPA(key): /bʌt/, [bɐt], enPR: bŭt
  • (stressed, US) IPA(key): /bʌt/, enPR: bŭt
  • (stressed, Scotland, Ireland) IPA(key): /bʊt/
  • (stressed, Northern England) IPA(key): /bʊt/
  • (Ireland) IPA(key): [bɞθ̠]
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /bət/, enPR: bət
  • Rhymes: -ʌt
  • Homophone: butt

Preposition

but

  1. Apart from, except (for), excluding.
    Synonyms: barring, except for, save for; see also Thesaurus:except
  2. (obsolete outside Scotland) Outside of.

Adverb

but (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly literary or poetic) Merely, only, just.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:merely
    • 1791, Robert Burns, "Ae Fond Kiss":
      For to see her was to love her,
      Love but her, and love for ever.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz:
      Now the Wicked Witch of the West had but one eye, yet that was as powerful as a telescope, and could see everywhere.
    • 1977, Alistair Horne, A Savage War of Peace, New York Review Books, 2006, p.49:
      The stony outcrops are often covered but thinly with arable soil; winters are bitingly cold, and rainfall scanty and unpredictable.
    • 1990, Claude de Bèze, 1688 revolution in Siam: the memoir of Father de Bèze, s.j, translated by E. W. Hutchinson, University Press, page 153:
      May the Protector of the Buddhist Faith grant me but seven more days grace of life to be quit of this disloyal couple, father and son.
  2. (Australia, Tyneside, conjunctive) Though, however.
    Synonyms: even so, nevertheless, notwithstanding, yet; see also Thesaurus:nevertheless
  3. Used as an intensifier.
    • 2013 Nora Roberts, Irish Thoroughbred p. 25 (Little, Brown) →ISBN
      "Jakers, but we worked." With a long breath she shut her eyes. "But it was too much for one woman and a half-grown girl [] "

Conjunction

but

  1. On the contrary, rather (as a regular adversative conjunction, introducing a word or clause in contrast or contradiction with the preceding negative clause or sentence).
  2. However, although, nevertheless, on the other hand (introducing a clause contrary to prior belief or in contrast with the preceding clause or sentence).
  3. Except that (introducing a subordinate clause which qualifies a negative statement); also, with omission of the subject of the subordinate clause, acting as a negative relative, "except one that", "except such that".
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act IV scene iii:
      And Crispin Crispian shall ne’er go by,
      From this day to the ending of the world,
      But we in it shall be rememberèd—
  4. (archaic) Without its also being the case that; unless that (introducing a necessary concomitant).
  5. (obsolete) Except with; unless with; without.
  6. (obsolete) Only; solely; merely.
  7. (obsolete) Until.
  8. (obsolete, following a negated expression of improbability) That. [16th–19th c.]
    • 1784, Joshua Reynolds, in John Ingamells, John Edgcumbe (eds.), The Letters of Sir Joshua Reynolds, Yale 2000, p. 131:
      It is not impossible but next year I may have the honour of waiting on your Lordship at St. Asaph, If I go to Ireland I certainly will go that way.
    • 1789, John Moore, Zeluco, Valancourt 2008, p. 132:
      “I am convinced, if you were to press this matter earnestly upon her, she would consent.”
      “It is not impossible but she might,” said Madame de Seidlits [] .
    • 1813, Journal of Natural Philosophy, July:
      It is not improbable but future observations will add Pliny's Well to the class of irregular reciprocators.

Usage notes

  • Beginning a sentence with a coordinating conjunction such as but is considered incorrect by classical grammarians who claim that a coordinating conjunction at the start of a sentence has nothing to connect. The use of the word in this way is very common, however; and it may be argued that the connection is with the preceding context. Nevertheless, it is best to avoid beginning a sentence with but in formal writing. Combining sentences or using however, nevertheless, still, or though (which are adverbs rather than conjunctions) is more appropriate for the formal style.

Synonyms

  • abbur (Chester)
  • (except): bar, unless, excepting, excluding, with the exception of, without
  • (however): yet, although, ac

Translations

Noun

but (plural buts)

  1. An instance or example of using the word "but".
  2. (Scotland) The outer room of a small two-room cottage.
  3. A limit; a boundary.
  4. The end; especially the larger or thicker end, or the blunt, in distinction from the sharp, end; the butt.

Verb

but (third-person singular simple present buts, present participle butting, simple past and past participle butted)

  1. (archaic) Use the word "but".

Derived terms

References

  • but at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • but in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • BTU, TBU, tub

Danish

Etymology

From Middle Low German butt.

Adjective

but

  1. (rare) blunt

Inflection

Synonyms

  • stump

Antonyms

  • spids

French

Pronunciation

  • (France) IPA(key): /byt/, /by/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /by/

Etymology 1

From Middle French but (mark, goal), from Old French but (aim, goal, end, target), from Old French butte (mound, knoll, target), from Frankish *but (stump, log), or from Old Norse bútr (log, stump, butt); both from Proto-Germanic *buttaz (end, piece), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to beat, push). The semantic development from "mound" to "target" is likely from martial training practice (see target). Cognate with Old English butt (tree stump). More at butt.

Noun

but m (plural buts)

  1. aim
  2. goal (result one is attempting to achieve)
  3. (sports) goal (in the place, act, or point sense)
Synonyms
  • fin
  • objectif
  • dessein
  • point
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From boire.

Verb

but

  1. third-person singular past historic of boire

Further reading

  • “but” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Noun

but (first-person possessive butku, second-person possessive butmu, third-person possessive butnya)

  1. (computing) bootstrap (process by which the operating system of a computer is loaded into its memory)

References

  • “but” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Maltese

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buːt/

Noun

but m (plural bwiet)

  1. pocket

Middle English

Noun

but

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of bote (boot)

Polish

Etymology

From Old Czech bot, from Old French bot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /but/

Noun

but m inan (diminutive bucik or butek, augmentative bucior or bucisko)

  1. shoe
  2. boot

Declension

Derived terms

  • bucior, bucisko

Further reading

  • but in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • but in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romani

Etymology

Inherited from Sauraseni Prakrit 𑀩𑀳𑀼𑀢𑁆𑀢 (bahutta), from Sanskrit बहुत्व (bahutva, much, many, very). Cognate with Hindi बहुत (bahut).

Adjective

but

  1. many
  2. much

Adverb

but

  1. very

References

  • Turner, Ralph Lilley (1969–1985), “bahutva”, in A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London: Oxford University Press, page 519
  • Boretzky, Norbert; Igla, Birgit (1994), “but”, in Wörterbuch Romani-Deutsch-Englisch für den südosteuropäischen Raum : mit einer Grammatik der Dialektvarianten [Romani-German-English dictionary for the Southern European region] (in German), Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, →ISBN, page 39
  • Marcel Courthiade (2009), “but B-ćham: -e I”, in Melinda Rézműves, editor, Morri angluni rromane ćhibǎqi evroputni lavustik = Első rromani nyelvű európai szótáram : cigány, magyar, angol, francia, spanyol, német, ukrán, román, horvát, szlovák, görög [My First European-Romani Dictionary: Romani, Hungarian, English, French, Spanish, German, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croatian, Slovak, Greek] (in Hungarian; English), Budapest: Fővárosi Onkormányzat Cigány Ház--Romano Kher, →ISBN, page 97
  • Marcel Courthiade (2009), “but II”, in Melinda Rézműves, editor, Morri angluni rromane ćhibǎqi evroputni lavustik = Első rromani nyelvű európai szótáram : cigány, magyar, angol, francia, spanyol, német, ukrán, román, horvát, szlovák, görög [My First European-Romani Dictionary: Romani, Hungarian, English, French, Spanish, German, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croatian, Slovak, Greek] (in Hungarian; English), Budapest: Fővárosi Onkormányzat Cigány Ház--Romano Kher, →ISBN, page 97
  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018), “but”, in ニューエクスプレスプラス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Plus Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, published 2021, →ISBN, OCLC 1267332830, page 147

Romanian

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish بوت(but)

Noun

but n (plural buturi)

  1. thigh of an animal

Declension


Scots

Noun

but (plural buts)

  1. The outer room of a small two-room cottage.

Preposition

but

  1. Outside of, without.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish بوت(but)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bût/

Noun

bȕt m (Cyrillic spelling бу̏т)

  1. thigh
  2. ham

Declension

References

  • “but” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Turkish

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish بود(bud), بوت(but), from Proto-Turkic. Compare Old Turkic [script needed] (būt).

Noun

but (definite accusative butu, plural butlar)

  1. thigh

Synonyms

  • uyluk

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /but/

Noun

but (nominative plural buts)

  1. boot

Declension


Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse bútr, likely in ablaut relation to Old Norse bauta, Old High German bōzan, Old English bēatan, English beat. Compare Jamtish búss, Norwegian butt, buss.

Pronunciation 1

  • IPA(key): /bʉːt/
    Rhymes: -ʉ́ːt

Noun

but m (definite butn)

  1. A thick stick.
  2. A piece, clod, lump.
  3. In general that which is bulky and shapeless.
  4. A cumulus cloud.
Derived terms
  • (cloud): butes
  • butut
  • butsko

Pronunciation 2

  • IPA(key): /²bʉːt/
    Rhymes: -ʉ̀ːt

Verb

but

  1. To earth up potatoes with a certain kind of plough.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to put forward as an objection.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)