Can in Scrabble Dictionary

What does can mean? Is can a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is can worth? can how many points in Words With Friends? What does can mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for can

See how to calculate how many points for can.

Is can a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word can is a Scrabble US word. The word can is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

C3A1N1

Is can a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word can is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

C3A1N1

Is can a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word can is a Words With Friends word. The word can is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4A1N2

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Valid words made from Can

You can make 3 words from 'can' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'can'

CAN 5 

2 letters words from 'can'

AN 2NA 2

All 3 letters words made out of can

can acn cna nca anc nac

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word can. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in can.

Definitions and meaning of can

can

Etymology 1

From Middle English can, first and third person singular of connen, cunnen (to be able, know how), from Old English can(n), first and third person singular of cunnan (to know how), from Proto-Germanic *kunnaną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵneh₃- (whence know). Compare West Frisian kinne, Dutch kunnen, Low German könen, German können, Danish and Norwegian Bokmål kunne, Swedish and Norwegian Nynorsk kunna. Doublet of con. See also: canny, cunning.

Alternative forms

  • canne (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (stressed)
    • enPR: kăn
    • (Received Pronunciation, Ireland) IPA(key): /ˈkæn/, [ˈkʰan], [ˈkʰæn]
    • (General American, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈkæn/, [ˈkʰæn], [ˈkʰɛən], [ˈkʰeən] (see w:/æ/ raising)
    • Rhymes: -æn
  • (unstressed)
    • IPA(key): /kən/, [kʰən], [kʰn̩]

Verb

can (third-person singular simple present can, present participle -, simple past could, past participle (obsolete except in adjectival use) couth)

  1. (auxiliary verb, defective) To know how to; to be able to.
    Synonym: be able to
    Antonyms: cannot, can't, can’t
    • (Can we date this quote by Reginald Pecock and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Clerks which can write books.
  2. (modal auxiliary verb, defective, informal) May; to be permitted or enabled to.
    Synonym: may
  3. (modal auxiliary verb, defective) To have the potential to; be possible.
  4. (auxiliary verb, defective) Used with verbs of perception.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To know.
    Synonyms: cognize, grok, ken
    • ca.1360-1387, William Langland, Piers Plowman
      I can rimes of Robin Hood.
    • ca.1360-1387, William Langland, Piers Plowman
      I can no Latin, quod she.
Usage notes
  • For missing forms, substitute inflected forms of be able to, as:
    • I might be able to go.
    • I was able to go yesterday.
    • I have been able to go, since I was seven.
    • I had been able to go before.
    • I will be able to go tomorrow.
  • The word could also suffices in many tenses. “I would be able to go” is equivalent to “I could go”, and “I was unable to go” can be rendered “I could not go”. (Unless there is a clear indication otherwise, “could verb” means “would be able to verb”, but “could not verb” means “was/were unable to verb”.)
  • The present tense negative can not is usually contracted to cannot (more formal) or can’t (less formal).
  • The use of can in asking permission sometimes is criticized as being impolite or incorrect by those who favour the more formal alternative “may I...?”.
  • Can is sometimes used rhetorically to issue a command, placing the command in the form of a request. For instance, “Can you hand me that pen?” as a polite substitution for “Hand me that pen.”
  • Some US dialects that glottalize the final /t/ in can’t (/kæn(ʔ)/), in order to differentiate can’t from can, pronounce can as /kɛn/ even when stressed.
Translations
See also
  • Appendix:English modal verbs
  • Appendix:English tag questions

Etymology 2

From Middle English canne, from Old English canne (glass, container, cup, can), from Proto-Germanic *kannǭ (can, tankard, mug, cup), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *gan-, *gandʰ- (a vessel). Cognate with Scots can (can), West Frisian kanne (a jug, pitcher), Dutch kan (pot, mug), German Kanne (can, tankard, mug), Danish kande (can, mug, a measure), Swedish kanna (can, tankard, mug), Icelandic kanna (a can).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: kăn, IPA(key): /ˈkæn/
    • Rhymes: -æn
  • (General Australian, Southern England) IPA(key): /ˈkæːn/
    • Rhymes: -æːn
  • (æ-tensing) IPA(key): [ˈkeən]

Noun

can (plural cans)

  1. A more or less cylindrical vessel for liquids, usually of steel or aluminium, but sometimes of plastic, and with a carrying handle over the top.
  2. A container used to carry and dispense water for plants (a watering can).
  3. A tin-plate canister, often cylindrical, for preserved foods such as fruit, meat, or fish.
  4. (archaic) A chamber pot, now (US, slang) a toilet or lavatory.
    Shit or get off the can.
    Bob's in the can. You can wait a few minutes or just leave it with me.
  5. (US, slang) Buttocks.
  6. (slang) Jail or prison.
    Bob's in the can. He won't be back for a few years.
  7. (slang, in the plural) Headphones.
  8. (archaic) A drinking cup.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Vision of Sin
      Fill the cup and fill the can, / Have a rouse before the morn.
  9. (nautical) A cube-shaped buoy or marker used to denote a port-side lateral mark
  10. A chimney pot.
Synonyms
  • (toilet): See Thesaurus:chamber pot and Thesaurus:toilet
  • (place with a toilet): See Thesaurus:bathroom
  • (cylindrical metal container): tin (British & Australian at least)
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • kick-the-can
  • shitcan
Related terms
Translations

Verb

can (third-person singular simple present cans, present participle canning, simple past and past participle canned)

  1. To seal in a can.
  2. To preserve by heating and sealing in a jar or can.
  3. To discard, scrap or terminate (an idea, project, etc.).
  4. (transitive, slang) To shut up.
  5. (US, euphemistic) To fire or dismiss an employee.
  6. (golf, slang, transitive) To hole the ball.

Synonyms

  • (discard): bin, dump, scrap; see also Thesaurus:junk
  • (shut up): can it, stifle; see also Thesaurus:stop talking or Thesaurus:make silent
  • (dismiss an employee): axe, let go, shit-can; see also Thesaurus:lay off
Derived terms
  • decan, recan, uncan
  • canner, canning
Translations

Anagrams

  • ANC, CNA, NAC, NCA

Afar

Noun

can

  1. milk

Aragonese

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

can m (plural cans)

  1. dog

References

  • Bal Palazios, Santiago (2002), “can”, in Dizionario breu de a luenga aragonesa, Zaragoza, →ISBN

Asturian

Etymology

From Latin canis, canem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaŋ/

Noun

can m (plural canes)

  1. dog (animal)

Synonyms

  • perru

Azerbaijani

Etymology

From Persian جان(jân).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [d͡ʒɑn], [d͡zɑn]

Noun

can (definite accusative canı, plural canlar)

  1. soul, spirit
  2. being, creature, life
  3. body
  4. force, vigour

Declension

Derived terms

  • can atmaq
  • canlı
  • canlandırmaq

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈkan/

Contraction

can

  1. Contraction of ca en (the house of).

Further reading

  • “can” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Classical Nahuatl

Alternative forms

  • cānin

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaːn/

Pronoun

cān

  1. where

Derived terms

  • campa
  • canah

Related terms


Galician

Etymology 1

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese can, from Latin canis, canem. Cognate with Portuguese cão.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaŋ/

Noun

can m (plural cans)

  1. dog
  2. (historical) 20th century 5, 10 cents of peseta coin
Related terms
  • cadela
  • caíño
  • cairo
  • can de palleiro
  • dente cairo

Etymology 2

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese quan, from Latin quam. Cognate with Portuguese quão and Spanish cuan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaŋ/

Noun

can m (plural cans)

  1. khan

Etymology 3

Ultimately from Turkic *qan, contraction of *qaɣan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaŋ/

Noun

can m (plural cans)

  1. khan

References

  • “can” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “can” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “can” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “can” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “can” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Interlingua

Noun

can (plural canes)

  1. dog
  2. cock, hammer (of a firearm)

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish canaid, from Proto-Celtic *kaneti (to sing), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂n-. Compare Welsh canu, Latin canō, Ancient Greek καναχέω (kanakhéō), Persian خواندن(xândan).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kanˠ/

Verb

can (present analytic canann, future analytic canfaidh, verbal noun canadh, past participle canta)

  1. to sing

Conjugation

Mutation


Istriot

Etymology

From Latin canis.

Noun

can m

  1. dog

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kan/, [kän̺]

Etymology 1

From Turkic.

Alternative forms

  • cane

Noun

can m (invariable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of khan

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun

can m (plural cani)

  1. (poetic, literary) Apocopic form of cane; dog

Kurdish

Etymology

Related to Persian جان(jân).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒɑːn/

Noun

can ?

  1. soul

Ligurian

Etymology

From Latin canis, canem.

Noun

can m (plural chen)

  1. dog

Mandarin

Romanization

can

  1. Nonstandard spelling of cān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of cán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of cǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of càn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch

Verb

can

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of connen

Middle English

Noun

can

  1. Alternative form of canne

Occitan

Etymology

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin canis, canem.

Noun

can m (plural cans, feminine canha, feminine plural canhas)

  1. dog, hound

Old Occitan

Alternative forms

  • quan

Etymology

From Latin quandō.

Conjunction

can

  1. when

Adverb

can

  1. (interrogative) when

Descendants

  • Catalan: quan
  • Occitan: quand

Old Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin canis (dog), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ (dog).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkã/

Noun

can m

  1. dog
    • 13th century, Cancioneiro da Biblioteca Nacional, Alfonso X of Castile, B 476: Non quer'eu donzela fea (facsimile)
      Non quereu donzela fea / E ueloſa come cam
      I do not want an ugly maiden, as hairy as a dog

Descendants

  • Galician: can
  • Portuguese: cão

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English can, first and third person singular of connen, cunnen (to be able, know how), from Old English can(n), first and third person singular of cunnan (to know how), from Proto-Germanic *kunnaną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵneh₃- (whence know).

Verb

can (third-person singular present can, past cud)

  1. can
  2. be able to

Derived terms

  • cannae (cannot)

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish canaid (to sing), from Proto-Celtic *kaneti (to sing), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂n-. Compare Welsh canu, Latin canō, Ancient Greek καναχέω (kanakhéō), Persian خواندن(xândan).

Verb

can (past chan, future canaidh, verbal noun cantainn, past participle cante)

  1. to say

References

  • “can” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin canis, canem (compare Aromanian cãne, Catalan ca, Occitan can, French chien, Italian cane, Portuguese cão), from Proto-Italic *kō (accusative *kwanem), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ (accusative *ḱwónm̥).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kan/
  • Rhymes: -an

Noun

can m (plural canes)

  1. (formal) dog, hound
    Synonyms: perro, chucho (colloquial)

Hypernyms

  • cánido

Hyponyms

  • cachorro

Related terms

  • canijo
  • canino

Further reading

  • “can” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowing from Persian جان(jân, soul, vital spirit, life). Cognate with English quick.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒan/

Noun

can (definite accusative canı, plural canlar)

  1. soul, life, being
  2. sweetheart

Declension

See also

  • Can

Venetian

Etymology

From Latin canis, canem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaŋ/

Noun

can m (plural cani)

  1. dog

Vietnamese

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [kaːn˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [kaːŋ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [kaːŋ˧˧]

Etymology 1

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

Noun

can

  1. (alternative medicine) Synonym of gan (liver)

Etymology 2

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

Noun

can

  1. Short for Thiên Can (celestial stem).

Verb

can

  1. to concern; to apply to
  2. to be involved (in); to be implicated (in)

Etymology 3

Non-Sino-Vietnamese reading of Chinese (SV: gián).

Verb

can

  1. to dissuade (someone from doing something); to intervene

Etymology 4

From English canne.

Noun

(classifier cây, cái) can

  1. walking stick

Etymology 5

Verb

can

  1. to join; to unite; to sew together

Etymology 6

From French calque.

Verb

can

  1. to trace (through translucent paper), to do tracing
Derived terms

Volapük

Noun

can (nominative plural cans)

  1. sales commodity, merchandise, wares

Declension


Welsh

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /kan/

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

can

  1. bleached, white

Noun

can m (plural caniau)

  1. flour

Etymology 2

From Proto-Celtic *kantom (hundred), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm.

Adjective

can

  1. hundred

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

can m (plural caniau)

  1. a can

Mutation

See also

  • cân

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “can”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies
  • Definition from the BBC.

Yucatec Maya

Etymology 1

Numeral

can

  1. Obsolete spelling of kan

Etymology 2

Noun

can

  1. Obsolete spelling of kaan

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to put in a cylindrical container.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)