Canon in Scrabble Dictionary

What does canon mean? Is canon a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is canon worth? canon how many points in Words With Friends? What does canon mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for canon

See how to calculate how many points for canon.

Is canon a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word canon is a Scrabble US word. The word canon is worth 7 points in Scrabble:

C3A1N1O1N1

Is canon a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word canon is a Scrabble UK word and has 7 points:

C3A1N1O1N1

Is canon a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word canon is a Words With Friends word. The word canon is worth 10 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4A1N2O1N2

Our tools

Valid words made from Canon

You can make 17 words from 'canon' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


5 letters words from 'canon'

ANCON 7CANON 7

4 letters words from 'canon'

ANNO 4ANON 4
CANN 6CONN 6
NONA 4 

3 letters words from 'canon'

ANN 3CAN 5
CON 5NAN 3
NON 3OCA 5

2 letters words from 'canon'

AN 2NA 2
NO 2ON 2

All 5 letters words made out of canon

canon acnon cnaon ncaon ancon nacon caonn aconn coann ocann aocnn oacnn cnoan ncoan conan ocnan nocan oncan anocn naocn aoncn oancn noacn onacn canno acnno cnano ncano ancno nacno canno acnno cnano ncano ancno nacno cnnao ncnao cnnao ncnao nncao nncao annco nanco annco nanco nnaco nnaco caonn aconn coann ocann aocnn oacnn canon acnon cnaon ncaon ancon nacon conan ocnan cnoan ncoan oncan nocan aoncn oancn anocn naocn onacn noacn cnona ncona conna ocnna nocna oncna cnnoa ncnoa cnnoa ncnoa nncoa nncoa conna ocnna cnona ncona oncna nocna nonca onnca nnoca nnoca onnca nonca anonc naonc aonnc oannc noanc onanc annoc nanoc annoc nanoc nnaoc nnaoc aonnc oannc anonc naonc onanc noanc nonac onnac nnoac nnoac onnac nonac

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word canon. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in canon.

Definitions and meaning of canon

canon

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French canon, from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), from Semitic (compare Hebrew קָנֶה(qane, reed) and Arabic قَنَاة(qanāh, reed)). See also cane.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kăn'ən, IPA(key): /ˈkæn.ən/
  • Rhymes: -ænən
  • Homophone: cannon

Noun

canon (plural canons)

  1. A generally accepted principle; a rule.
    The trial must proceed according to the canons of law.
  2. A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field.
    • (Can we date this quote?), William Styron, "Irwin Shaw", in My Generation: Collected Nonfiction (2015), page 456
      the durable canon of American short fiction
  3. The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic.
    the entire Shakespeare canon
  4. A eucharistic prayer, particularly the Roman Canon.
  5. A religious law or body of law decreed by the church.
    We must proceed according to canon law.
  6. A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church.
  7. In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order.
  8. A member of a cathedral chapter; one who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.
  9. A piece of music in which the same melody is played by different voices, but beginning at different times; a round.
    Pachelbel’s Canon has become very popular.
  10. (Roman law) A rent or stipend payable at some regular time, generally annual, e.g., canon frumentarius
  11. (fandom) Those sources, especially including literary works, which are considered part of the main continuity regarding a given fictional universe.
    A spin-off book series revealed the aliens to be originally from Earth, but it's not canon.
    • 2014, Phineas and Ferb: Star Wars
      Meanwhile, having learned the whereabouts of the Death Star's plans, the rebels send their best platypus agent to obtain them, in hopes of finding a weakness. And none of this is canon, so just relax.
  12. (cooking) A rolled and filleted loin of meat; also called cannon.
    a canon of beef or lamb
  13. (printing, dated) A large size of type formerly used for printing the church canons, standardized as 48-point.
  14. The part of a bell by which it is suspended; the ear or shank of a bell.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  15. (billiards) A carom.
Synonyms
  • (48-point type): French canon
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English canoun, ultimately from Latin canonicus (either by shortening or back-formation from Old English canonic, or via Anglo-Norman chanoine).

Noun

canon (plural canons)

  1. A clergy member serving a cathedral or collegiate church.
  2. A canon regular, a member of any of several Roman Catholic religious orders.
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

canon (plural canons)

  1. Alternative spelling of qanun

Further reading

  • “canon” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

Anagrams

  • Ancon, Conan, ancon

Dutch

Etymology

From Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קנה(qaneh, reed)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaː.nɔn/
  • Hyphenation: ca‧non

Noun

canon m (plural canons, diminutive canonnetje n)

  1. canon (set of representative or pre-eminent literary works)
    1. (chiefly Christianity) canon (set of authoritative religious books, especially those constituting the Bible)
  2. (Christianity) canon (religious law)
  3. (music) canon (round, music piece consisting of the same melody sung by different voices)
  4. (Roman Catholicism) canon (part of a mass following the Sanctus up to the end of the Pater Noster, consisting mostly of prayers)
  5. (dated) canon (principle, rule)

Derived terms

  • canoniek
  • canoniseren

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ka.nɔ̃/

Etymology 1

From Old French canon, from canne + -on, corresponding to Italian cannone.

Noun

canon m (plural canons)

  1. cannon, (big) gun
  2. barrel (of firearm)
  3. cannon for a horse.

Etymology 2

From Old French canon, borrowed from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard).

The 'attractive person' sense comes from an ellipsis of canon de beauté.

Noun

canon m (plural canons)

  1. canon
  2. (music) canon
  3. (religion) canon
  4. (slang) hottie, dish, bombshell (attractive man/woman)
    Synonym: avion de chasse

Etymology 3

From the above noun (see sense 4) by conversion.

Adjective

canon (plural canons)

  1. (informal, of a person) hot, sexy

Etymology 4

canne +‎ -on.

Noun

canon m (plural canons)

  1. (slang) glass of wine

Further reading

  • “canon” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈka.noːn/
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈka.non/, [ˈkaː.nɔn]

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קנה(qaneh, reed)).

Noun

canōn m (genitive canonis); third declension

  1. a measuring line
  2. (figuratively) precept, rule, canon
  3. a yearly tribute paid to the emperor; (Medieval Latin, by extension) a periodic payment
  4. (Ecclesiastical Latin) authorized catalog, especially of books of the Bible or of the saints
  5. (Ecclesiastical Latin) decree of a church synod
  6. (Ecclesiastical Latin) the Canon of the Mass
  7. (Medieval Latin) relic
Declension

Third-declension noun.

Derived terms
  • canōnizō
Synonyms
  • (precept, rule): nōrma, praeceptum, rēgula
Descendants
  • Catalan: cànon
  • English: canon
  • French: canon
  • Irish: canóin
  • Italian: canone
  • Russian: кано́н (kanón)
  • Spanish: canon

Etymology 2

From canna (pipe), compare Italian cannone and Old French canon.

Noun

canōn m (genitive canōnis); third declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) a cannon (artillery)

References

  • canon in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • canon in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • canon in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • canon in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • canon in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “canon”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill

Norman

Etymology

From Old French canon.

Noun

canon m (plural canons)

  1. cannon

Old French

Etymology 1

canne +‎ -on, corresponding to Italian cannone.

Noun

canon m (oblique plural canons, nominative singular canons, nominative plural canon)

  1. tube
  2. cannon

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard).

  1. canon

Descendants

  • English: canon
  • French: canon
  • Norman: canon

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Greek κανών (kanón), possibly partly through a South Slavic language intermediate.

Noun

canon n (plural canoane)

  1. canon
  2. (usually in regards to religion) tenet, dogma, rule, norm, precept
  3. punishment or penance for breaking such a religious rule

Declension

Derived terms

  • canoni

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard) (compare κάννα (kánna, reed)), perhaps of Semitic origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkanon/, [ˈkanõn]

Noun

canon m (plural cánones)

  1. canon (principle, literary works, prayer, religious law, music piece)
  2. tax, fee

Synonyms

  • (principle): norma, precepto, regla

Related terms

  • canónico

References

Further reading

  • “canon” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Welsh

Alternative forms

  • canasom (literary, first-person plural)
  • canasant (literary, third-person plural)

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /ˈkanɔn/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈkaːnɔn/, /ˈkanɔn/

Verb

canon

  1. (colloquial) first-person plural preterite of canu
  2. (colloquial) third-person plural preterite of canu

Mutation


Source: wiktionary.org
  • a member of an order of clergy living in a clergy-house or within the precincts of a cathedral etc. in accordance with the canons of the church.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)