Cape in Scrabble Dictionary

What does cape mean? Is cape a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is cape worth? cape how many points in Words With Friends? What does cape mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for cape

See how to calculate how many points for cape.

Is cape a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word cape is a Scrabble US word. The word cape is worth 8 points in Scrabble:

C3A1P3E1

Is cape a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word cape is a Scrabble UK word and has 8 points:

C3A1P3E1

Is cape a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word cape is a Words With Friends word. The word cape is worth 10 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4A1P4E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Cape

You can make 13 words from 'cape' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'cape'

CAPE 8PACE 8

3 letters words from 'cape'

ACE 5APE 5
CAP 7CEP 7
PAC 7PEA 5
PEC 7 

2 letters words from 'cape'

AE 2EA 2
PA 4PE 4

All 4 letters words made out of cape

cape acpe cpae pcae apce pace caep acep ceap ecap aecp eacp cpea pcea cepa ecpa peca epca apec paec aepc eapc peac epac

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word cape. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in cape.

Definitions and meaning of cape

cape

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kāp, IPA(key): /keɪp/
  • Rhymes: -eɪp

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle French cap, from Occitan cap, from Latin caput (head).

Noun

cape (plural capes)

  1. (geography) A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into a sea or lake; a promontory; a headland.
    Synonyms: chersonese, peninsula, point
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From French cape, from Old Occitan capa, from Late Latin cappa (cape). The second sense is metonymic from the fact that many superheroes wear capes.

Noun

cape (plural capes)

  1. A sleeveless garment or part of a garment, hanging from the neck over the back, arms, and shoulders.
    • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  2. (slang) A superhero.
    • 2017, April Daniels, Dreadnought: Nemesis - Book One, Diversion Books (→ISBN):
      Rows and rows of booths and pavilions stretch across the floor, draped with glowing holograms and shifting signs beckoning capes to try their wares. Bystander insurance. Hypertech components. Mystical ingredients. Training DVDs ...

Derived terms

  • cape for (slang)
  • capeshit

Descendants

  • Japanese: ケープ (kēpu)
Translations
See also
  • cloak

Verb

cape (third-person singular simple present capes, present participle caping, simple past and past participle caped)

  1. To incite or attract (a bull) to charge a certain direction, by waving a cape.
    • 2013, Odie Hawkins, The Black Matador, "Sugar" (AuthorHouse, →ISBN), page 140:
      “I became a novillero when I was fourteen, but I had already been going to the fields and caping bulls since I was about twelve."
  2. (nautical) To head or point; to keep a course.
    The ship capes southwest by south.
  3. To skin an animal, particularly a deer.
  4. (uncommon) To wear a cape.
    • 2017, April Daniels, Dreadnought: Nemesis - Book One (Diversion Books, →ISBN):
      Calamity tells me about the adventures she's had caping around the city, and I tell her about how I transitioned. When I tell her about David, and how he suddenly became a jerk overnight, she surprises me by nodding along.
  5. (US, slang) To defend or praise, especially that which is unworthy.
    • 2016, Ken Makin, "Clinton-Trump debacle underscores gross misunderstanding of politics", Urban Pro Weekly, 6 October - 12 October 2016, page 5:
      A lot of African-Americans believe the answer is Clinton, mostly because "she's not Trump" and because President Barack Obama is shamelessly caping for her.
    • 2017, Laila Nur, quoted in Jordan Green, "Far-right groups converge behind anti-sharia message in Raleigh", Triad City Beat, 14 June - 20 June 2017, page 9:
      Many times, you see white supremacist groups caping for women to mask their agenda of white nationalism.
    • 2019, Julian Lutz, "Elizabeth Warren has authenticity", The Hawk (Saint Joseph's University), 3 April 2019, page 8:
      [] Biden is the old man who once caped for systematic racism; []
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:cape.

Etymology 3

From Middle English capen (to stare, gape, look for, seek), from Old English capian (to look), from Proto-West Germanic *kapēn. Cognate with German gaffen (to stare at curiously, rubberneck), Low German gapen (to stare). Related to keep.

Verb

cape (third-person singular simple present capes, present participle caping, simple past and past participle caped)

  1. (obsolete) To look for, search after.
    (Geoffrey Chaucer)
  2. (rare, dialectal or obsolete) To gaze or stare.
    (Geoffrey Chaucer)
References
  • The Middle English Dictionary

Anagrams

  • APEC, EPAC, EPCA, PACE, PECA, Pace, pace

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English cape.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /keːp/
  • Hyphenation: cape
  • Rhymes: -eːp

Noun

cape m (plural capes, diminutive capeje n)

  1. A cape.
    Synonym: mantel

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Old Occitan capa, from Late Latin cappa (compare the inherited doublet chape; cf. also the Old Northern French variant cape).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kap/
  • Homophones: capent, capes

Noun

cape f (plural capes)

  1. cape

Verb

cape

  1. first-person singular present indicative of caper
  2. third-person singular present indicative of caper
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of caper
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of caper
  5. second-person singular imperative of caper

Further reading

  • “cape” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Adjective

cape

  1. (slang) tired

Italian

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ape

Noun

cape f

  1. plural of capa

Anagrams

  • pace

Latin

Verb

cape

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of capiō

References

  • cape in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English cæppe.

Noun

cape

  1. Alternative form of cappe

Etymology 2

From Latin cāpa, potentially through an Old English *cāpa.

Noun

cape

  1. Alternative form of cope

Neapolitan

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkkapə/

Noun

cape f

  1. plural of capa

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English cape, from French cape, from Late Latin cappa. Cognate with kappe (cloak), kåpe (cloak), kapp (cape, headland).

Noun

cape m (definite singular capen, indefinite plural caper, definite plural capene)

  1. a cape (sleeveless garment worn by women, which covers the shoulders and arms)

References

  • “cape” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “cape” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English cape, from French cape, from Late Latin cappa.

Noun

cape m (definite singular capen, indefinite plural capar, definite plural capane)

  1. a cape (sleeveless garment worn by women, which covers the shoulders and arms)

References

  • “cape” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -api

Verb

cape

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of capar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of capar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of capar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of capar

Spanish

Verb

cape

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of capar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of capar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of capar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of capar.

Swedish

Noun

cape c

  1. cape (sleeveless garment used by women)

Declension


Source: wiktionary.org
  • a head or point of land jutting into the sea or a lake.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)