Core in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does core mean? Is core a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is core worth? core how many points in Words With Friends? What does core mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for core

See how to calculate how many points for core.

Is core a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word core is a Scrabble US word. The word core is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

C3O1R1E1

Is core a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word core is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

C3O1R1E1

Is core a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word core is a Words With Friends word. The word core is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4O1R1E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Core

You can make 15 words from 'core' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

4 letters words from 'core'

CERO 6CORE 6

3 letters words from 'core'

COR 5ECO 5
ORC 5ORE 3
REC 5REO 3
ROC 5ROE 3

2 letters words from 'core'

ER 2OE 2
OR 2RE 2

All 4 letters words made out of core

core ocre croe rcoe orce roce coer ocer ceor ecor oecr eocr creo rceo cero ecro reco erco orec roec oerc eorc reoc eroc

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word core. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in core.

Definitions and meaning of core

core

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɔː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /ko(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /koə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophone: corps; caw (non-rhotic accents with the horse-hoarse merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English core, kore, coor (apple-core, pith), of uncertain origin. Possibly of native English origin (compare Old English corn (seed", also "grain), or perhaps from Old French cuer (heart), from Latin cor (heart); or from Old French cors (body), from Latin corpus (body). Compare also Middle English colk, coke, coll (the heart or centre of an apple or onion, core), Dutch kern (core), German Kern (core). See also heart, corpse.

Noun

core (countable and uncountable, plural cores)

  1. The central part of a fruit, containing the kernels or seeds.
  2. The heart or inner part of a physical thing.
  3. The center or inner part of a space or area.
    • the core of the square
  4. The most important part of a thing; the essence.
  5. (botany) Used to designate the main and most diverse monophyletic group within a clade or taxonomic group.
  6. (engineering) The portion of a mold that creates an internal cavity within a casting or that makes a hole in or through a casting.
  7. The bony process which forms the central axis of the horns in many animals.
  8. (computing, informal, historical) Ellipsis of core memory; magnetic data storage.
  9. (computer hardware) An individual computer processor, in the sense when several processors (called cores or CPU cores) are plugged together in one single integrated circuit to work as one (called a multi-core processor).
  10. (engineering) The material between surface materials in a structured composite sandwich material.
  11. (engineering, nuclear physics) The inner part of a nuclear reactor, in which the nuclear reaction takes place.
  12. (military) The central fissile portion of a fission weapon.
  13. A piece of ferromagnetic material (e.g., soft iron), inside the windings of an electromagnet, that channels the magnetic field.
  14. A disorder of sheep caused by worms in the liver.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  15. A cylindrical sample of rock or other materials obtained by core drilling.
  16. (medicine) A tiny sample of organic material obtained by means of a fine-needle biopsy.
  17. (biochemistry) The central part of a protein's structure, consisting mostly of hydrophobic amino acids.
  18. (game theory) The set of feasible allocations that cannot be improved upon by a subset (a coalition) of the economy's agents.
  19. (printing) A hollow cylindrical piece of cardboard around which a web of paper or plastic is wound.
  20. (physics) An atomic nucleus plus inner electrons (i.e., an atom, except for its valence electrons).

Synonyms

  • (The most important part of a thing): crux, gist; See also Thesaurus:gist
Hyponyms
  • (central part of fruit): apple core
  • (inner part of a physical thing): bifacial core
  • (cylindrical sample): drill core
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Translingual: core eudicots, core Malvales
Translations

Adjective

core (not comparable)

  1. Forming the most important or essential part.

Verb

core (third-person singular simple present cores, present participle coring, simple past and past participle cored)

  1. To remove the core of an apple or other fruit.
  2. To extract a sample with a drill.
Derived terms
  • corer
  • uncore
  • uncored

Translations

Etymology 2

See corps

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. (obsolete) A body of individuals; an assemblage.
    • He was in a core of people.
Translations

Etymology 3

See chore

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. A miner's underground working time or shift.
Translations

Etymology 4

From Hebrew כֹּר

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. (historical units of measure) Alternative form of cor: a former Hebrew and Phoenician unit of volume.

Etymology 5

Possibly an acronym for cash on return

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. (automotive, machinery, aviation, marine) A deposit paid by the purchaser of a rebuilt part, to be refunded on return of a used, rebuildable part, or the returned rebuildable part itself.

References

Anagrams

  • ROCE, cero, cero-, creo, ocre

Istriot

Alternative forms

  • cor

Etymology

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

Noun

core

  1. heart
    • Ti son la manduleîna del mio core;
      You are the almond of my heart;

Italian

Noun

core (core)

  1. Archaic form of cuore.

Anagrams

  • c'ero, cero, cerò, creo, creò, ocre, reco, recò

Latin

Noun

core

  1. ablative singular of coris

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • coor, kore

Etymology

Unknown; derivation from either Old French cuer (heart) or cors (body) has been suggested, though both possibilities pose serious problems.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔːr(ə)/

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. core (centre of a fruit)
  2. (rare, by extension) The middle of something.

Descendants

  • English: core

References

  • “cōre, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • James A. H. Murray [et al.], editors (1884–1928), “Core, sb.1”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volume II (C), London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697, page 989, column 3.

Neapolitan

Etymology

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

Noun

core m (plural core)

  1. heart

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English core.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɔ.ɾi/, /ˈkɔɹ/

Noun

core m (plural cores)

  1. (computer architecture) core (independent unit in a processor with several such units)
    Synonym: núcleo

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɔ.ɾi/

Verb

core

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of corar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of corar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of corar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of corar

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to remove the central part of.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)