Corn in Scrabble Dictionary

What does corn mean? Is corn a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is corn worth? corn how many points in Words With Friends? What does corn mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for corn

See how to calculate how many points for corn.

Is corn a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word corn is a Scrabble US word. The word corn is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

C3O1R1N1

Is corn a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word corn is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

C3O1R1N1

Is corn a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word corn is a Words With Friends word. The word corn is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4O1R1N2

Our tools

Valid words made from Corn

You can make 9 words from 'corn' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'corn'

CORN 6 

3 letters words from 'corn'

CON 5COR 5
NOR 3ORC 5
ROC 5 

2 letters words from 'corn'

NO 2ON 2
OR 2 

All 4 letters words made out of corn

corn ocrn cron rcon orcn rocn conr ocnr cnor ncor oncr nocr crno rcno cnro ncro rnco nrco ornc ronc onrc norc rnoc nroc

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word corn. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in corn.

Definitions and meaning of corn

corn

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɔːn/
  • (US, Canada) IPA(key): /kɔɹn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)n

Etymology 1

From Middle English corn, from Old English corn, from Proto-Germanic *kurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm (grain; worn-down), from *ǵerh₂- (grow old, mature). Cognate with Dutch koren, Low German Koorn, German Korn, Norwegian and Swedish korn; see also Albanian grurë, Russian зерно́ (zernó), Czech zrno, Latin grānum, Lithuanian žirnis and English grain. In sense 'maize' a shortening from earlier Indian corn.

Noun

corn (usually uncountable, plural corns)

  1. (Britain, uncountable) The main cereal plant grown for its grain in a given region, such as oats in parts of Scotland and Ireland, and wheat or barley in England and Wales.
  2. (US, Canada, Australia, uncountable) Maize, a grain crop of the species Zea mays.
  3. A grain or seed, especially of a cereal crop.
    He paid her the nominal fee of two corns of barley.
  4. A small, hard particle.
    • (Can we date this quote by Bishop Hall and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      corn of sand
    • 1852, Thomas Antisell, Hand-book of the Useful Arts
      corns of powder
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Tok Pisin: kon
  • Maori: kānga
Translations
See also

Verb

corn (third-person singular simple present corns, present participle corning, simple past and past participle corned)

  1. (US, Canada) to granulate; to form a substance into grains
  2. (US, Canada) to preserve using coarse salt, e.g. corned beef
  3. (US, Canada) to provide with corn (typically maize; or, in Scotland, oats) for feed
  4. (transitive) to render intoxicated
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English corne, from Old French corn (modern French cor), from Latin cornu.

Noun

corn (plural corns)

  1. A type of callus, usually on the feet or hands.
    Synonym: clavus
Hyponyms
  • callus
Translations

Etymology 3

This use was first used in 1932, as corny, something appealing to country folk.

Noun

corn (uncountable)

  1. (US, Canada) Something (e.g. acting, humour, music, or writing) which is deemed old-fashioned or intended to induce emotion.
    • 1975, Tschirlie, Backpacker magazine,
      He had a sharp wit, true enough, but also a good, healthy mountaineer's love of pure corn, the slapstick stuff, the in-jokes that get funnier with every repetition and never amuse anybody who wasn't there.
Derived terms

Etymology 4

From the resemblance to white corn kernels.

Noun

corn (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) A type of granular snow formed by repeated melting and re-freezing, often in mountain spring conditions.
    Synonym: corn snow

References

Anagrams

  • Cron

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin cornū, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (horn).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈkɔɾn/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈkɔrn/

Noun

corn m (plural corns)

  1. horn (of animal)
    Synonym: banya
  2. (music) horn

Derived terms

  • corn anglès
  • cornar

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish corn (drinking horn, goblet; trumpet, horn; curl), from Latin cornū.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /koːɾˠn̪ˠ/

Noun

corn m (genitive singular coirn, nominative plural coirn)

  1. horn (musical instrument)
  2. drinking-horn
    Synonyms: corn óil, buabhall
  3. (sports) cup
  4. (racing) plate

Declension

Derived terms

Verb

corn (present analytic cornann, future analytic cornfaidh, verbal noun cornadh, past participle corntha)

  1. (transitive) roll, coil

Conjugation

Alternative forms

  • cornaigh, cornáil

Mutation

Further reading

  • "corn" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “corn” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “corn” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Middle English

Etymology 1

Inherited from Old English corn; from Proto-Germanic *kurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm. Doublet of greyn.

Alternative forms

  • corne, korn, coorn, curn, coren, koren

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔrn/, /kɔːrn/

Noun

corn (plural corn or cornes)

  1. Any plant that bears grain, especially wheat; a field planted with such plants.
  2. Any kind or sort of grain, especially used as food.
  3. A seed or germ of a plant that is not a grain.
  4. A grain or seed used as a unit of weight.
  5. The optimum result or product; the superior section or bit.
  6. The deserving; those who are morally right.
  7. A swelling or bole; an external tumourous growth.
Related terms
  • corny
  • kernel
  • peper corn
Descendants
  • English: corn
    • Tok Pisin: kon
    • Maori: kānga
  • Scots: corn, curn
  • Yola: coorn
References
  • “cō̆rn (n.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-08.

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Old French corne.

Noun

corn

  1. Alternative form of corne (callus)

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *kurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm (grain). Cognate with Old Frisian korn, Old Saxon korn (Low German Koorn), Dutch koren, Old High German korn, Old Norse korn, Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌽 (kaurn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /korn/, [korˠn]

Noun

corn n

  1. corn, a grain or seed
    • 880-1150, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  2. a cornlike pimple, a corn on the foot

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: corn, corne, korn, coorn, curn, coren, koren
    • English: corn
      • Tok Pisin: kon
      • Maori: kānga
    • Scots: corn, curn
    • Yola: coorn

Old French

Alternative forms

  • cor, corne

Etymology

From Latin cornū.

Noun

corn m (oblique plural corns, nominative singular corns, nominative plural corn)

  1. horn (bony projection found on the head of some animals)
  2. horn (instrument used to create sound)
    Synonyms: olifan, graisle

Descendants

  • French: cor

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [korn]

Etymology 1

From Latin cornū, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (horn).

Noun

corn n (plural coarne)

  1. horn
Declension
Derived terms
  • încorna
  • cornări
  • cornos
Related terms
  • cornut

Etymology 2

From Latin cornus.

Noun

corn m (plural corni)

  1. cornel, European cornel, Cornus mas
  2. rafter (of a house)
Declension

See also

  • sânger

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English corn, from Old English corn.

Noun

corn (plural corns)

  1. corn
  2. oats
  3. (in plural) crops (of grain)

Verb

corn (third-person singular present corns, present participle cornin, past cornt, past participle cornt)

  1. to feed (a horse) with oats or grain

Welsh

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin cornū.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔrn/

Noun

corn m (plural cyrn)

  1. horn
  2. (obsolete) chimney

Derived terms

  • rhewi'n gorn (to freeze solid)
  • Siôn Corn (Father Christmas, Santa Claus)

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “corn”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to preserve with salt.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)