Dies in Scrabble Dictionary

What does dies mean? Is dies a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is dies worth? dies how many points in Words With Friends? What does dies mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for dies

See how to calculate how many points for dies.

Is dies a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word dies is a Scrabble US word. The word dies is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

D2I1E1S1

Is dies a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word dies is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

D2I1E1S1

Is dies a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word dies is a Words With Friends word. The word dies is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

D2I1E1S1

Our tools

Valid words made from Dies

You can make 19 words from 'dies' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'dies'

DESI 5DIES 5
IDES 5SIDE 5

3 letters words from 'dies'

DEI 4DIE 4
DIS 4EDS 4
IDE 4IDS 4
SED 4SEI 3

2 letters words from 'dies'

DE 3DI 3
ED 3ES 2
ID 3IS 2
SI 2 

All 4 letters words made out of dies

dies ides deis edis ieds eids dise idse dsie sdie isde side desi edsi dsei sdei esdi sedi iesd eisd ised sied esid seid

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word dies. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in dies.

Definitions and meaning of dies

dies

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /daɪz/
  • Homophone: dyes
  • Rhymes: -aɪz

Verb

dies

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of die

Noun

dies

  1. plural of die (when used in the sense of a pattern)

Anagrams

  • -side, Desi, EIDs, Eids, IDEs, IEDs, Ides, SEID, Side, deis, desi, eids, ides, side, sied

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈdi.əs/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈdi.es/

Noun

dies

  1. plural of dia

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈdiːs]
  • Rhymes: -iːs

Pronoun

dies

  1. Alternative form of dieses

Usage notes

In the nominative and accusative neuter, the forms dieses and dies are in general interchangeable, but there is a tendency to prefer one or the other in the following situations:

  • In adjectival usage, dieses is generally preferred to dies. So dieses Haus ("this house") is more common than the also correct and synonymic dies Haus.
  • In substantival usage, dieses is used to refer to a previously used neuter noun:
Unser Unternehmen sollte das Gebäude verkaufen. Wir können dieses nicht mehr gebrauchen.
Our company should sell the building. We cannot make use of it anymore.
  • Dies is used to refer to a preceding context or phrase:
Unser Unternehmen sollte das Gebäude verkaufen. Dies würde uns viel Geld einbringen.
Our company should sell the building. This would earn us a lot of money.
Dies is also used to refer to something the speaker perceives with the senses (deixis):
Sieh dir dies mal an! – Have a look at this! (e.g. a newspaper article)
  • The above habits are mainly true of formal speech and writing. Colloquially, the shorter dies is often preferred, but the pronouns das and es are even more common.

Further reading

  • dies in Duden online

Latin

Etymology

Back-formed from the accusative diem (at a time when the vowel was still long), from Proto-Italic *djēm, the accusative of *djous, from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws (heaven, sky). The original nominative survives as *diūs in two fossilised phrases: mē diūs fidius (an interjection) and nū diūs tertius (day before yesterday, literally now (is) the third day). The d in diēs is a puzzle with some suggesting dialect borrowing and others referring to an etymon *diyew- via Lindeman's Law. But note the possible Proto-Italic allophony between -CjV- and -CiV-, which may be the cause for this divergence (See WT:AITC).

Cognate with Ancient Greek Ζήν (Zḗn), Old Armenian տիւ (tiw, daytime), Old Irish día, Welsh dydd, Polish dzień. English day (q.v.) is a false cognate. The Italic stem was also the source of Iovis, the genitive of Iuppiter and was generally interchangeable with it in earlier times, still shown by the analogical formation Diēspiter.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈdi.eːs/, [ˈd̪i.eːs]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈdi.es/, [ˈd̪iː.ɛs]

Noun

diēs m or f (genitive diēī); fifth declension

  1. A day, particularly:
    1. A solar or sidereal day of about 24 hours, especially (historical) Roman dates reckoned from one midnight to the next.
      ...ante diem III idus Ianuarias...
      ...the third day before the January ides [i.e., Jan. 11]...
    2. Daytime: a period of light between sunrise and sunset.
      ...prima diei hora...
      ...the first hour of day [i.e., prime]...
    3. (often in the feminine) A set day: a date, an appointment.

Usage notes

Dates in the Roman calendar were reckoned according to the calends (kalendae), the nones (nōnae), and the ides (īdūs). The calends of every month was its first day; the nones and ides of most months were their 5th and 13th days; and the nones and ides of the four original 31-day months—Mārtius, Māius, Quīntīlis or Iūlius, and Octōber—were two days later. January 1st was thus kalendae Iānuāriae or Iānuāriī. The day preceding any of these three principal days was called its eve (prīdiē). January 12th was thus prīdiē īdūs Iānuāriās or Iānuāriī (pr. Id. Ian.). All other days of the month were expressed by counting inclusively forward to the next of these three principal days and, in early Latin, this was expressed in the ablative. January 11th was thus diē tertiō ante īdūs Iānuāriās or Iānuāriī (iii Id. Ian.). By the time of classical Latin, however, the ante had moved to the beginning of the expression and it became an accusative absolute: ante diem tertium īdūs Iānuāriās or Iānuāriī (a.d. iii Id. Ian.). In this form, the date functioned as a single indeclinable noun and could serve as the object of prepositions such as ex and in.

Unlike most fifth-declension nouns, diēs is not exclusively feminine. It was typically masculine, particularly in the plural. It appears as a feminine noun when being personified as a goddess, in some specific dates, in reference to the passing of time, and occasionally in other contexts.

Declension

Fifth-declension noun.

Antonyms

  • (daytime): nox

Derived terms

Related terms

  • diū
  • dōnec

Descendants

References

Further reading

  • dies in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dies in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dies in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • dies in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • dies in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dies in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Latvian

Verb

dies

  1. 3rd person singular future indicative form of diet
  2. 3rd person plural future indicative form of diet

Middle Dutch

Adverb

dies

  1. therefore, because of that, for that reason

Conjunction

dies

  1. until
  2. because

Determiner

dies

  1. masculine/neuter genitive singular of die

Contraction

dies

  1. Contraction of die es.

Northern Sami

Determiner

dies

  1. locative singular of diet

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

dies

  1. passive form of die

Papiamentu

Etymology

From Spanish diez and Portuguese dez and Kabuverdianu dés.

Numeral

dies

  1. ten (10)

Romansch

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum. Compare French dos.

Noun

dies m

  1. (anatomy) back

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dьnьsь

Adverb

dies (Cyrillic spelling диес)

  1. (Kajkavian) today

Source: wiktionary.org
  • DIE, to cut with a material shaping device.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)