Din in Scrabble Dictionary

What does din mean? Is din a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is din worth? din how many points in Words With Friends? What does din mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for din

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Is din a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word din is a Scrabble US word. The word din is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

D2I1N1

Is din a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word din is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

D2I1N1

Is din a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word din is a Words With Friends word. The word din is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

D2I1N2

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Valid words made from Din

You can make 5 words from 'din' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'din'

DIN 4NID 4

2 letters words from 'din'

DI 3ID 3
IN 2 

All 3 letters words made out of din

din idn dni ndi ind nid

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word din. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in din.

Definitions and meaning of din

din

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dĭn, IPA(key): /dɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English din, dinne, dynne, from Old English dyne, from Proto-Germanic *duniz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰún-is, from *dʰwen- (to make a noise). Cognate with Sanskrit धुनि (dhúni, sounding), ध्वनति (dhvánati, to make a noise, to roar), Old Norse dynr, Norwegian Nynorsk dynja.

Noun

din (countable and uncountable, plural dins)

  1. A loud noise; a cacophony or loud commotion.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act I, Scene 2,[1]
      Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?
    • 1850, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam, London: Edward Moxon, Canto 87, p. 129,[2]
      How often, hither wandering down,
      My Arthur found your shadows fair,
      And shook to all the liberal air
      The dust and din and steam of town:
    • 1998, Ian McEwan, Amsterdam, New York: Anchor, 1999, Part 1, Chapter 1, pp. 9-10,[4]
      So many faces Clive had never seen by daylight, and looking terrible, like cadavers jerked upright to welcome the newly dead. Invigorated by this jolt of misanthropy, he moved sleekly through the din, ignored his name when it was called, withdrew his elbow when it was plucked [...]
    • 2014, Daniel Taylor, “England and Wayne Rooney see off Scotland in their own back yard,” The Guardian, 18 November 2014,[5]
      England certainly made a mockery of the claim that they might somehow be intimidated by the Glasgow din. Celtic Park was a loud, seething pit of bias.
Quotations
  • For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:din.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English dinnen, from Old English dynnan, from Proto-Germanic *dunjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwen- (to make a noise).

Verb

din (third-person singular simple present dins, present participle dinning, simple past and past participle dinned)

  1. (intransitive) To make a din, to resound.
    • 1820, William Wordsworth, “The Waggoner” Canto 2, in The Miscellaneous Poems of William Wordsworth, London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown, Volume 2, p. 21,[6]
      For, spite of rumbling of the wheels,
      A welcome greeting he can hear;—
      It is a fiddle in its glee
      Dinning from the CHERRY TREE!
    • 1920, Zane Grey, “The Rube’s Pennant” in The Redheaded Outfield and Other Baseball Stories, New York: Grosset & Dunlap, p. 68,[7]
      My confused senses received a dull roar of pounding feet and dinning voices as the herald of victory.
    • 1924, Edith Wharton, Old New York: New Year’s Day (The ’Seventies), New York: D. Appleton & Co., Chapter 4, pp. 62-63,[8]
      Should she speak of having been at the fire herself—or should she not? The question dinned in her brain so loudly that she could hardly hear what her companion was saying []
  2. (intransitive) (of a place) To be filled with sound, to resound.
    • 1914, Rex Beach, The Auction Block, New York: Harper & Bros., Chapter 3, p. 33,[9]
      The room was dinning with the strains of an invisible orchestra and the vocal uproar []
  3. (transitive) To assail (a person, the ears) with loud noise.
    • 1716, Joseph Addison, The Free-Holder: or Political Essays, London: D. Midwinter & J. Tonson, No. 8, 16 January, 1716, pp. 45-46,[10]
      She ought in such Cases to exert the Authority of the Curtain Lecture; and if she finds him of a rebellious Disposition, to tame him, as they do Birds of Prey, by dinning him in the Ears all Night long.
    • 1817, John Keats, “On the Sea” in Richard Monckton Milnes (editor), Life, Letters, and Literary Remains, of John Keats, London: Edward Moxon, 1848, Volume 2, p. 291,[11]
      Oh ye! whose ears are dinn’d with uproar rude,
      Or fed too much with cloying melody,—
      Sit ye near some old cavern’s mouth, and brood
      Until ye start, as if the sea-nymphs quired!
    • 1938, Graham Greene, Brighton Rock, New York: Vintage, 2002, Chapter 1,
      No alarm-clock dinned her to get up but the morning light woke her, pouring through the uncurtained glass.
  4. (transitive) To repeat continuously, as though to the point of deafening or exhausting somebody.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift The Hibernian Patriot: Being a Collection of the Drapier’s Letters to the People of Ireland concerning Mr. Wood’s Brass Half-Pence, London, 1730, Letter 2, p. 61,[12]
      This has been often dinned in my Ears.
    • 1866, Elizabeth Gaskell, Wives and Daughters, Chapter 50,[13]
      “Mamma, do you forget that I have promised to marry Roger Hamley?” said Cynthia quietly.
      “No! of course I don’t—how can I, with Molly always dinning the word ‘engagement’ into my ears? []
    • 1949, George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four, Part One, Chapter 6,[14]
      By careful early conditioning, by games and cold water, by the rubbish that was dinned into them at school and in the Spies and the Youth League, by lectures, parades, songs, slogans, and martial music, the natural feeling had been driven out of them.
    • 2004, Roy Porter, Flesh in the Age of Reason, Penguin, page 183,
      His mother had dinned The Whole Duty of Man into him in early childhood.

Derived terms

  • outdin

Synonyms

  • (repeat continuously): drum.

Anagrams

  • IDN, IND, Ind, Ind., in d., ind., nid

Abinomn

Noun

din

  1. (anatomy) calf

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • dihet

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *deina (day), from Proto-Indo-European *déi-no-, ultimately from *dyew- (to shine). Cognate with Proto-Slavic *dьnь, Latvian diena, Lithuanian dėina, Old Prussian dēinā.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /din/

Verb

din (first-person singular past tense diu, participle dinë)

  1. to break (of the day)

Related terms

  • ditë
  • gdhij
  • di

References


Azerbaijani

Etymology

Ultimately from Arabic دِين(dīn).

Noun

din (definite accusative dini, plural dinlər)

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

Declension


Breton

Pronoun

din

  1. first-person singular of da

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse þínn, from Proto-Germanic *þīnaz (your).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diːn/, [d̥iːˀn]

Determiner

din (neuter dit, plural dine)

  1. your, thy (singular; one owner)
  2. yours, thine (singular; one owner)

See also


Galician

Verb

din

  1. third-person plural present indicative of dicir

Indonesian

Etymology

From Malay din, from Arabic دِين(dīn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈdɪn]

Noun

din (plural, first-person possessive dinku, second-person possessive dinmu, third-person possessive dinnya)

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)
    Synonym: agama

Further reading

  • “din” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Kiput

Etymology

From Proto-North Sarawak *daqan, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *daqan.

Noun

din

  1. branch

Ladino

Etymology

Borrowed from Hebrew דִּין(din).

Noun

din m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling דין‎)

  1. religious law

Malay

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic دِين(dīn).

Pronunciation

  • (Johor-Selangor) IPA(key): /den/
  • (Riau-Lingga) IPA(key): /dɪn/
  • Rhymes: -den, -en

Noun

din

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

Synonyms

  • agama
  • anutan
  • kepercayaan

Maltese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diːn/

Determiner

din

  1. feminine singular of dan

Northern Sami

Pronunciation

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈtiːn/

Pronoun

dīn

  1. accusative/genitive of dii

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse þínn.

Pronunciation

Determiner

din m (feminine di, neuter ditt, plural dine)

  1. your, yours

See also

References

  • “din” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse þínn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /din/ (example of pronunciation)

Determiner

din m (feminine di, neuter ditt, plural dine)

  1. your, yours

See also

References

  • “din” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Occitan

Preposition

din

  1. inside; alternative form of dins

Old High German

Alternative forms

  • thin

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *þīnaz, whence also Old English þīn, Old Norse þínn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diːn/

Pronoun

dīn

  1. genitive singular of du

Determiner

dīn

  1. your (singular)

Inflection

This determiner needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Middle High German: dīn
    • Alemannic German: diin, dyn
    • Cimbrian: dain, doi
    • German: dein
    • Hunsrik: dein
    • Luxembourgish: däin
    • Yiddish: דײַן(dayn)

References

Joseph Wright, "An Old High German Primer, Second Edition"


Romanian

Etymology

From de + în.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /din/

Preposition

din (+accusative)

  1. on, on top of
  2. from, out of

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish þīn, from Old Norse þínn, from Proto-Germanic *þīnaz.

Determiner

din c (neuter ditt, plural dina)

  1. your, yours; of one thing in the common gender (speaking to one person)
  2. you (only in this use:)
Declension

Etymology 2

Noun

din

  1. definite singular of di

Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /din/

Particle

din

  1. Indicates affirmation: too, also

Usage notes

This form is mainly used after words ending in a consonant, while rin is used following words that end in a vowel. The distinction is not always made, however.


Turkish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Arabic دِين(dīn).

Noun

din (definite accusative dini, plural dinler)

  1. (religion) System of beliefs dealing with soul, deity or life after death.
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

din

  1. second-person singular imperative of dinmek

Uzbek

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic دِين(dīn).

Noun

din (plural dinlar)

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

Volapük

Etymology

Borrowed from German Ding.

Noun

din (nominative plural dins)

  1. thing

Declension

Derived terms

  • dinöf
  • dinöfik

Welsh

Noun

din

  1. Soft mutation of tin.

Mutation


West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪn/

Noun

din c (plural dinnen, diminutive dintsje)

  1. pine, coniferous tree of the genus Pinus.

Further reading

  • “din (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Zhuang

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *tiːnᴬ (foot). Cognate with Thai ตีน (dtiin), Lao ຕີນ (tīn), ᦎᦲᧃ (ṫiin), Shan တိၼ် (tǐn), Ahom 𑜄𑜢𑜃𑜫 (tin), Bouyei dinl.

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /tin˨˦/
  • Tone numbers: din1
  • Hyphenation: din

Noun

din (old orthography din, Sawndip forms 䟓, 𬻚, 𭴀, 丁, 𮛷, 𧿬, 䠄, 𦘭, 伩)

  1. foot (of a human)
  2. base; foot; lowest part of an object

See also

  • nyauj

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to make a loud noise.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)