Dire in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does dire mean? Is dire a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is dire worth? dire how many points in Words With Friends? What does dire mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for dire

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Is dire a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word dire is a Scrabble US word. The word dire is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

D2I1R1E1

Is dire a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word dire is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

D2I1R1E1

Is dire a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word dire is a Words With Friends word. The word dire is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

D2I1R1E1

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Valid words made from Dire

You can make 17 words from 'dire' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'dire'

DIRE 5IRED 5
RIDE 5 

3 letters words from 'dire'

DEI 4DIE 4
IDE 4IRE 3
RED 4REI 3
RID 4 

2 letters words from 'dire'

DE 3DI 3
ED 3ER 2
ID 3RE 2

All 4 letters words made out of dire

dire idre drie rdie irde ride dier ider deir edir iedr eidr drei rdei deri edri redi erdi ired ried ierd eird reid erid

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word dire. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in dire.

Definitions and meaning of dire

dire

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin dīrus (fearful, ominous).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdaɪ̯ə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Adjective

dire (comparative direr or more dire, superlative direst or most dire)

  1. Warning of bad consequences: ill-boding; portentous.
  2. Requiring action to prevent bad consequences: urgent, pressing.
  3. Expressing bad consequences: dreadful; dismal
    Synonyms: horrible, terrible, lamentable
  4. (informal) Bad in quality, awful, terrible.
    His dire mistake allowed her to checkmate him with her next move.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:dire.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • voir dire

Anagrams

  • Deri, Dier, IDer, Reid, dier, drie, ired, ride

French

Etymology

From Middle French dire, from Old French dire, from Latin dīcō, from Proto-Italic *deikō, from Proto-Indo-European *déyḱti (to show, point out).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diʁ/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /d͡ziʁ/
  • Rhymes: -iʁ

Verb

dire

  1. to say, to tell
  2. (informal) (transitive with à) to be of interest to someone, to interest someone
  3. (informal) (transitive with à) to sound familiar

Conjugation

Derived terms

Related terms

  • diction
  • indicible

Noun

dire m (plural dires)

  1. saying (that which is said)
  2. belief, opinion

Derived terms

  • aux dires de

Further reading

  • “dire” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ride, ridé

Italian

Alternative forms

  • dicere (archaic)

Etymology

From a contraction of Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō, from Proto-Italic *deikō, from Proto-Indo-European *déyḱti (to show, point out).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdi.re/
  • Hyphenation: dì‧re

Verb

dìre (first-person singular present dìco, first-person singular past historic dìssi, past participle détto, first-person singular imperfect dicévo, second-person singular imperative di' or (with written accent, with following syntactic gemination) , auxiliary avere) (transitive)

  1. to say, tell
  2. to recite
  3. to mean
  4. to think
  5. to admit

Conjugation

Related terms

Anagrams

  • Drei, Redi, idre, redi, ride

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈdiː.re/, [ˈd̪iːɾɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈdi.re/, [ˈd̪iːrɛ]

Adjective

dīre

  1. vocative masculine singular of dīrus

References

  • dire in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French dire, from a contraction of Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb

dire

  1. to say (express using language)

Descendants

  • French: dire

Occitan

Alternative forms

  • díder, díser

Etymology

From Old Occitan dir, dire, from a contraction of Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb

dire

  1. to say (express using language)
  2. to mean; to signify

Conjugation


Old French

Etymology

From a contraction of Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb

dire

  1. (chiefly intransitive) to say
  2. (transitive) to recount (a story)

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants

  • Middle French: dire
    • French: dire
  • Norman: dithe
  • Walloon: dire

References

  • “Appendix E: Irregular Verbs” in E. Einhorn (1974), Old French: A Concise Handbook, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 153

Old Occitan

Alternative forms

  • dir

Etymology

From a contraction of Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb

dire

  1. to say

Descendants

  • Occitan: dire

Walloon

Etymology

From Old French dire, from a contraction of Latin dīcō, dīcere.

Verb

dire

  1. to say

Source: wiktionary.org
  • disastrous.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)