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Is do a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word do is a Scrabble US word. The word do is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

D2O1

Is do a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word do is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

D2O1

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Yes. The word do is a Words With Friends word. The word do is worth 3 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

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2 letters words from 'do'

DO 3OD 3

Definitions and meaning of do

do

Etymology 1

From Middle English don, from Old English dōn, from Proto-West Germanic *dōn, from Proto-Germanic *dōną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, do, make).

For senses 4 and 5, compare Old Norse duga, whence Danish du.

The past tense form is from Middle English didde, dude, from Old English dyde, *diede, from Proto-Germanic *dedǭ/*dedē, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰédʰeh₁ti, an athematic e-reduplicated verb of the same root *dʰeh₁-.

The obligatory, meaningless use of do in interrogative, negative, and, formerly, affirmative sentences, which is unusual in Germanic languages, is thought by some linguists to be one of the Brittonicisms in English, calqued from Brythonic. It is first recorded in Middle English, where it may have marked the perfective aspect, though in some cases the meaning seems to be imperfective. In Early Modern English, any meaning in such contexts was lost, making it a dummy auxiliary, and soon thereafter its use became mandatory in most questions and negation.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /duː/, enPR: do͞o
  • (US, Canada) IPA(key): /du/, enPR: do͞o
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /dʉː/
  • (colloquial; for some speakers, when "do" is unstressed and the next word starts with /j/) IPA(key): /d͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -uː
  • Homophones: doo, doux
  • Homophones: dew, due (in accents with yod-dropping)

Verb

do (third-person singular simple present does, present participle doing, simple past did, past participle done)

  1. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker.
    1. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker in a question whose main verb is not another auxiliary verb or be.
    2. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker in negations with the indicative and imperative moods.
    3. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker for emphasis with the indicative, imperative, and subjunctive moods.
    4. (pro-verb) A syntactic marker that refers back to an earlier verb and allows the speaker to avoid repeating the verb; in most dialects, not used with auxiliaries such as be, though it can be in AAVE.
      • 1930, George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin, “Embraceable You”
        Don't be a naughty baby,
        Come to papa, come to papa, do!
        My sweet embraceable you.
  2. (transitive) To perform; to execute.
    Synonyms: accomplish, carry out, functionate
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To cause, make (someone) (do something).
  4. (intransitive, transitive) To suffice.
  5. (intransitive) To be reasonable or acceptable.
  6. (ditransitive) To have (as an effect).
  7. (intransitive) To fare, perform (well or poorly).
  8. (transitive, chiefly in questions) To have as one's job.
  9. To perform the tasks or actions associated with (something).
  10. To cook.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:cook
  11. (transitive) To travel in, to tour, to make a circuit of.
  12. (transitive) To treat in a certain way.
  13. (transitive) To work for or on, by way of caring for, looking after, preparing, cleaning, keeping in order, etc.
  14. (intransitive, obsolete) To act or behave in a certain manner; to conduct oneself.
  15. (transitive) To spend (time) in jail. (See also do time)
    Synonym: serve
  16. (transitive) To impersonate or depict.
    Synonyms: imitate, personate, take off
  17. (with 'a' and the name of a person, place, event, etc.) To copy or emulate the actions or behaviour that is associated with the person or thing mentioned.
  18. (transitive, slang) To kill.
    Synonyms: do in, murder, off, rub out; see also Thesaurus:kill
  19. (transitive, slang) To deal with for good and all; to finish up; to undo; to ruin; to do for.
    • 1870, Charles Reade, Put Yourself in His Place
      Sometimes they lie in wait in these dark streets, and fracture his skull, [] or break his arm, or cut the sinew of his wrist; and that they call doing him.
  20. (informal) To punish for a misdemeanor.
  21. (transitive, slang) To have sex with. (See also do it)
    Synonyms: go to bed with, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  22. (transitive) To cheat or swindle.
    Synonyms: defraud, diddle, mug off, rip off, scam; see also Thesaurus:deceive
    • 1852, Thomas De Quincey, Sir William Hamilton
      He was not to be done, at his time of life, by frivolous offers of a compromise that might have secured him seventy-five per cent.
  23. (transitive) To convert into a certain form; especially, to translate.
  24. (transitive, intransitive) To finish.
  25. (Britain, dated, intransitive) To work as a domestic servant (with for).
    Synonyms: attend, serve, wait on; see also Thesaurus:serve
  26. (archaic, dialectal, transitive, auxiliary) Used to form the present progressive of verbs.
  27. (stock exchange) To cash or to advance money for, as a bill or note.
  28. (informal, transitive, ditransitive) To make or provide.
    Synonyms: furnish, give, supply; see also Thesaurus:give
  29. (informal, transitive) To injure (one's own body part).
    • "Defender Kolo Toure admitted Given will be a loss, but gave his backing to Nielsen. 'I think he's done his shoulder,' said the Ivorian."
    • "Watto will spend the entire winter stretching and doing Pilates, and do a hamstring after bending down to pick up his petrol cap after dropping it filling his car at Caltex Cronulla."
    • "'I knew straight away I'd done my ACL, I heard the sound - it was very loud and a few of the boys said they heard it as well,' Otten said."
  30. (transitive) To take drugs.
  31. (transitive, in the form be doing [somewhere]) To exist with a purpose or for a reason.
Usage notes
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb do had two such forms: dost, in auxiliary uses, and doest, in other uses. The past tense of both forms is didst.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form doth was used as an auxiliary, and the form doeth was used elsewhere.
Conjugation
Antonyms
  • don't
Derived terms
Translations

See do/translations § Verb.

See also
  • Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take

Noun

do (plural dos or do's)

  1. (colloquial) A party, celebration, social function.
    Synonyms: get-together; see also Thesaurus:party
  2. (informal) A hairdo.
  3. Something that can or should be done (usually in the phrase dos and don'ts).
    Antonym: don't
  4. (obsolete) A deed; an act.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  5. (archaic) Ado; bustle; stir; to-do; A period of confusion or argument.
    Synonym: to-do
    • 1689, John Selden, Table Talk
      A great deal of do, and a great deal of trouble.
  6. (obsolete, Britain, slang) A cheat; a swindler.
  7. (obsolete, Britain, slang) An act of swindling; a fraud or deception.
Usage notes
  • For the plural of the noun, the spelling dos would be correct; do's is often used for the sake of legibility, but is sometimes considered incorrect.
  • For the party, the term usually implies a social function of modest size and formality.
Translations

See do/translations § Noun.

Etymology 2

From the name of musicologist Giovanni Battista Doni, who suggested replacing the original ut with an open syllable for ease of singing. First found in Italian.

Alternative forms

  • doh, Do

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: , IPA(key): /dəʊ/
  • (US) enPR: , IPA(key): /doʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophones: doe, dough, d'oh

Noun

do (plural dos)

  1. (music) A syllable used in solfège to represent the first and eighth tonic of a major scale.
    Synonym: (archaic) ut
Translations

See do/translations § Noun.

See also

Etymology 3

Short for ditto.

Alternative forms

  • do.

Adverb

do (not comparable)

  1. (rare) Abbreviation of ditto.

Etymology 4

Shortening of dozen.

Numeral

do

  1. The cardinal number occurring after el and before do one in a duodecimal system. Written 10, decimal value 12.

See also

  • gro, mo

References

  • do at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • O&D, O.D., O/D, OD, od

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • don (Gheg)

Verb

do

  1. second/third-person singular present indicative of dua

Atong (India)

Etymology

From Hindi दो (do).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /do/

Numeral

do (Bengali script দো)

  1. two

Synonyms

  • ni
  • rongni
  • tu

References

  • van Breugel, Seino. 2015. Atong-English dictionary, second edition. Available online: https://www.academia.edu/487044/Atong_English_Dictionary. Stated in Appendix 3.

Bambara

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [dòꜜò]

Noun

do

  1. group

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Barai

Noun

do

  1. water

References

  • The Papuan Languages of New Guinea (1986, →ISBN)

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈdo/

Etymology 1

From Latin dōnum (gift)

Noun

do m (plural dons)

  1. gift
  2. talent

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Italian do.

Noun

do m (plural dos)

  1. (music) do (first note of diatonic scale)

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

do

  1. (obsolete) third-person singular present subjunctive form of dar

Central Franconian

Etymology 1

From Old High German dār (there).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɔː/

Adverb

do

  1. here; there; in this or that place

Etymology 2

From Old High German duo (then), variant of do, dō. Compare German da, Dutch toen.

Alternative forms

  • du, dunn (southern Moselle Francoinan)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doː/ (traditional)
  • IPA(key): /dɔː/ (now sometimes by conflation with etymology 1 under standard German influence)

Adverb

do

  1. (Ripuarian, northern Moselle Franconian) then; back then (at a certain time in the past)

Etymology 3

From Old High German du.

Alternative forms

  • du (many dialects)
  • dou (some dialects of Moselle Franconian)
  • de (unstressed form)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doː/

Pronoun

do

  1. (few dialects, including Kölsch) thou; you (singular)

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *do.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /do/

Preposition

do + genitive

  1. into, in (to the inside of)
  2. to, in (in the direction of, and arriving at; indicating destination)
  3. until (up to the time of)
  4. by (at some time before the given time)

Further reading

  • do in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • do in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Etymology

From Italian do (the note).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doː/
  • Hyphenation: do
  • Rhymes: -oː

Noun

do m or f (plural do's)

  1. do, the musical note
  2. (Belgium) C, the musical note

Synonyms

  • ut (archaic)

See also

  • (notes): re, mi, fa, sol, la, si; bee, kruis, mol

Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /do/
  • Hyphenation: do

Etymology 1

Noun

do (accusative singular do-on, plural do-oj, accusative plural do-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.

See also

  • (Latin-script letter names) litero; a, bo, co, ĉo, do, e, fo, go, ĝo, ho, ĥo, i, jo, ĵo, ko, lo, mo, no, o, po, ro, so, ŝo, to, u, ŭo, vo, zo

Etymology 2

From French donc.

Adverb

do

  1. therefore, then, so (with conclusion), indeed, however

Fala

Etymology

From Old Portuguese do, from de + o.

Preposition

do m (plural dos, feminine da, feminine plural das)

  1. contraction of de o (of the).

Faroese

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian do.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /toː/
  • Rhymes: -oː

Noun

do n (genitive singular dos, plural do)

  1. (music) do

Declension


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /do/
  • Rhymes: -o

Noun

do m (plural do)

  1. (music) do, the note 'C'.
    Synonym: ut

Further reading

  • “do” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Etymology

From contraction of preposition de (of, from) + masculine definite article o (the)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̪ʊ/

Contraction

do m (feminine da, masculine plural dos, feminine plural das)

  1. of the; from the; 's

Garo

Alternative forms

  • do·o (A·chik)

Etymology

Glottal stop loss of do·o

Noun

do (Mandi)

  1. bird

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French dos (back)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /do/

Noun

do

  1. back (of the body)

Hunsrik

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /toː/

Adverb

do

  1. here
    Synonyms: hie, hier
  2. then; so
    Synonym: dann

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Ido

Adverb

do

  1. so, therefore

Irish

Etymology 1

From Middle Irish ro-, from Old Irish ro-, from Proto-Celtic *ɸro-.

Alternative forms

  • d’ (used before vowels and lenited fh-)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠɔ/, /d̪ˠə/

Particle

do (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster, literary) prefixed before the preterite, imperfect and conditional forms of a verb

Etymology 2

Possibly related to the use of go in place a as the direct relative particle, influenced by Etymology 1.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠɔ/, /d̪ˠə/

Particle

do (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster, literary) relative marker (nominative, accusative)

Etymology 3

From Old Irish do, from Proto-Celtic *do (to, for).

Alternative forms

  • d’ (used before vowel sounds)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠɔ/, /d̪ˠə/
  • (Connacht) IPA(key): /ɡə/ (as if spelled go; do and go (to, up to, until) have largely become conflated in this dialect)

Preposition

do (plus dative, triggers lenition)

  1. to, for
  2. used with the possessive determiners mo, do, bhur to indicate the direct object of a verbal noun, in place of ag after a form of in the progressive aspect
Inflection
Derived terms

See also: Category:Irish phrasal verbs with particle (do)

Etymology 4

From Old Irish do, from Proto-Celtic *tu (your, thy).

Alternative forms

  • d’ (used before vowel sounds)
  • t’ (Munster, used before vowel sounds)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̪ˠə/

Determiner

do (triggers lenition)

  1. your (singular)

See also

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “do”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • "do" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “do” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “do” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔ/
  • Rhymes:

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • (rare)

Verb

do

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dare

Etymology 2

Noun

do m

  1. do (musical note)
  2. C (musical note or key)

Anagrams

  • od

Japanese

Romanization

do

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Ladin

Preposition

do

  1. behind
    Antonym: dant
  2. before (time)

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *didō, from Proto-Indo-European *dédeh₃ti, from the root *deh₃- (give). The reduplication was lost in Latin in the present tense, but is preserved in the other Italic languages. A root aorist (from Proto-Indo-European *déh₃t) is preserved in Venetic 𐌆𐌏𐌕𐌏 (doto); the other Italic perfect forms reflect a reduplicated stative, *dedai. However, the root aorist possibly served as the source of the Latin present forms.

Cognates include Ancient Greek δίδωμι (dídōmi), Sanskrit ददाति (dádāti), Old Persian 𐎭𐎭𐎠𐎬𐎢𐎺 (dā-).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /doː/, [d̪oː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /do/, [d̪ɔ]

Verb

(present infinitive dare, perfect active dedī, supine datum); first conjugation, irregular

  1. I give
    Synonym: dōnō
  2. I offer, render, present with, bestow
    Synonym: dōnō
    • c. 200 BC, Plautus Captivi ("the captives") (English and Latin text)
  3. I put
  4. I yield, surrender, concede
  5. I adduce (e.g., a witness)

Conjugation

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Aromanian: dau, dari
  • Corsican:
  • Dalmatian: dur
  • Emilian: dèr
  • Friulian:
  • Istriot:
  • Interlingua: dar
  • Istro-Romanian: dåu
  • Ladin: , dèr
  • Ligurian:
  • Lombard: da, daa
  • Navarro-Aragonese: dar
    • Aragonese: dar
  • Neapolitan:
  • Italian: dare
  • Old Leonese: dar
    • Asturian: dar
    • Leonese: dar
    • Mirandese: dar
  • Old Portuguese: dar
    • Fala: dal
    • Galician: dar
    • Portuguese: dar
      • Angolar: ra
      • Annobonese: da
      • Guinea-Bissau Creole: da
      • Indo-Portuguese:
      • Kabuverdianu: da
      • Korlai Creole Portuguese: da
      • Macanese:
      • Kristang: da
      • Principense: da
      • Sãotomense: da
      • Saramaccan:
  • Old Occitan: dar
    • Occitan: dar
    • Old Catalan: dar
      • Catalan: dar
  • Old Spanish: dar
    • Extremaduran: dal
    • Ladino: dar
    • Spanish: dar
      • Chavacano: dale
  • Piedmontese:
  • Romagnol:
  • Romanian: da, dare
  • Romansch: dar, der
  • Sabir: dar, dara
  • Sardinian: dàe, dai, dare
  • Sicilian: dari, rari
  • Tarantino: dare
  • Venetian: dar

Further reading

  • do in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • do in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • do in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

References


Ligurian

Alternative forms

  • dro (obsolete)

Etymology

de +‎ o

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /du/

Contraction

do

  1. of the (masculine singular)

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *do.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɔ/

Preposition

do (with genitive)

  1. to, into
    • 1998, Erwin Hannusch, Niedersorbisch praktisch und verständlich, Bauzten: Domowina, →ISBN, p. 30:

Further reading

  • do in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag
  • do in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /do/, [doː]
    • Rhymes: -oː

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *þar.

Adverb

do

  1. there, in that place

Etymology 2

Verb

do

  1. second-person singular imperative of doen

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Possibly an abbreviation of "do-hūs" ("do house") from Middle Low German dōn.

Noun

do m or n (definite singular doen or doet, indefinite plural doer or do, definite plural doene or doa)

  1. a toilet, a loo
    Synonyms: dass, toalett
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Noun

do m

  1. do (the musical note)

References

  • “do” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Possibly an abbreviation of "do-hūs" ("do house") from Middle Low German dōn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /duː/

Noun

do m or n (definite singular doen or doet, indefinite plural doar or do, definite plural doane or doa)

  1. a toilet, a loo
    Synonyms: dass, toalett

Etymology 2

From Old Norse þó.

Adverb

do

  1. anyhow, still, nevertheless
Derived terms

For other terms please refer to do (Bokmål) for the time being.

  • dodraug
  • dopapir

Etymology 3

From the name of musicologist Giovanni Battista Doni, who suggested replacing the original ut with an open syllable for ease of singing. First found in Italian.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doː/ (example of pronunciation)
  • Homophone:

Noun

do m (definite singular do-en, indefinite plural do-ar, definite plural do-ane)

  1. (music) do, a syllable used in solfège to represent the second note of a major scale.
Coordinate terms
  • (scale of solfège): do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, do

Etymology 4

Verb

do

  1. (non-standard since 1917) past singular of døy

References

  • “do” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • od

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *do (to), from Proto-Indo-European *de. Unrelated to the prefix to-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /do/

Preposition

do (with dative; triggers lenition of a following consonant-initial noun.)

  1. to, for

Inflection

Combinations with a definite article:

  • don(d), dun(d) (to/for the sg)
  • donaib, dunaib (to/for the pl)

Combinations with a possessive determiner:

  • dom (to/for my)
  • dot (to/for your sg)
  • dia (to/for his/her/their)

Combinations with a relative pronoun:

  • dia· (to/for whom/which)

Alternative forms

  • du

Pronoun

do

  1. Alternative spelling of

Adverb

do

  1. Alternative spelling of

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 do”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Thurneysen, Rudolf (1940, reprinted 2003) D. A. Binchy and Osborn Bergin, transl., A Grammar of Old Irish, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, →ISBN, pages 274, 506

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

Compare German da.

Adverb

do

  1. here

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *do, from Proto-Indo-European *de, *do, whence English to.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɔ/

Preposition

do

  1. (+ genitive) to, towards (indicates an intended end-point or location)
    Synonym: (sometimes) na
  2. (+ genitive) into, in (indicates movement towards the interior of something)
  3. (+ genitive) for, to (indicates an intended use or purpose, often analyzable as an verbal adjective or attributive noun in English)
  4. (+ genitive) to (indicates the subject of an address or action)
  5. (+ genitive) until, till, to
  6. (+ genitive) up to, as many as
  7. (+ genitive) by (indicates an intended deadline)

Further reading

  • do in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • do in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • d'o (dated)

Etymology

From Old Portuguese do, from de (of) + o (the). Akin to Spanish del and French du.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal, Brazil) IPA(key): /du/
    • Homophone: Du
  • (South Brazil) IPA(key): /do/
  • (Azores, Madeira) IPA(key): /dø/
    • Homophone: dou
  • Hyphenation: do

Contraction

do (plural dos, feminine da, feminine plural das)

  1. Contraction of de o (pertaining or relating to the); of the; from the (masculine singular)

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:do.

See also

  • da (feminine form)
  • dos (plural form)
  • das (feminine plural form)

Saterland Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doː/

Etymology 1

See the etymology of the main entry.

Article

do

  1. plural of die

Etymology 2

From Old Frisian thā, from Proto-Germanic *þan.

Adverb

do

  1. then

References

  • “die” in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch
  • “do” in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (stressed) /t̪ɔ/, (unstressed) /t̪ə/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish do. Cognates include Irish do.

Determiner

do (triggers lenition)

  1. thy, your (singular)
See also

Etymology 2

From Old Irish do. Cognates include Irish do.

Preposition

do (+ dative, triggers lenition)

  1. to
  2. for

Inflection

Usage notes

  • Before a word beginning with a vowel or fh followed by a vowel it takes the form do dh'.
  • If the definite article in the singular follows, it combines with do into don:

Synonyms

  • a

Derived terms

  • an dèidh do
  • 's urrainn do

Etymology 3

From Middle Irish ro-, from Old Irish ro-, from Proto-Celtic *ɸro-.

Particle

do (triggers lenition)

  1. indicates the past tense of a verb
Usage notes
  • Becomes dh' before a word beginning with a vowel or a lenited fh followed by a vowel.
  • Usually omitted before a consonant except after the negative particle cha.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *do, from Proto-Indo-European *de, *do.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dô/

Adverb

(Cyrillic spelling до̏)

  1. only, except
  2. around, approximately
  3. due to, because of

Preposition

(Cyrillic spelling до̏) (+ genitive case)

  1. up to, to, until, as far as, by
  2. before (= prȉje/prȅ)
  3. beside, next (to)
  4. (by extension, idiomatic and figurative meanings) up to one; interested in; feel like

Etymology 2

From Proto-Slavic *dolъ.

Alternative forms

  • dȏl

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dôː/

Noun

 m (Cyrillic spelling до̑)

  1. (regional, Bosnia, Serbia) dale, small valley
Declension
Derived terms
  • dolìna

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Italian do.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dôː/

Noun

 m (Cyrillic spelling до̑) (indeclinable)

  1. (music) do

References

  • “do” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • “do” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • “do” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *do.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔ/

Preposition

do (+ genitive)

  1. into, in, to, until

Further reading

  • do in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *do.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɔ/

Preposition

do

  1. (with genitive) by (some time before the given time)
  2. (with genitive) till

Further reading

  • do”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdo/, [ˈd̪o]
  • Hyphenation: do

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Italian do.

Noun

do m (plural dos)

  1. do (musical note)
  2. C (musical note or key)

See also

  • (notes): do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si

Etymology 2

From contraction of preposition de (of, from) + adverb o (in where).

Adverb

do

  1. (obsolete) where
    Synonym: (modern) donde

Pronoun

do

  1. (obsolete) where
    Synonym: (modern) donde
Derived terms
  • doquier
  • doquiera

Taworta

Noun

do

  1. fire

Further reading

Bill Palmer, The Languages and Linguistics of the New Guinea Area (→ISBN, 2017), page 531, table 95, Comparative basic vocabulary in Lakes Plain Languages


Turkish

Noun

do

  1. C (musical note)

Venetian

Verb

do

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dar (I give)

Vietnamese

Etymology

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [zɔ˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [jɔ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [jɔ˧˧]

Preposition

do

  1. (neutral passive voice marker) by
  2. because of; due to

Related terms

  • (passive voice marker) bị (negative), được (positive)

Volapük

Conjunction

do

  1. though, although, even though

Welsh

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /doː/

Etymology 1

Adverb

do

  1. yes
  2. indeed

Usage notes

  • Used to express an affirmative answer to verbs in the past tense.

Etymology 2

Alternative forms

  • da (colloquial)
  • deuaf (literary)
  • dof (literary)

Verb

do

  1. (colloquial) first-person singular future of dod

Mutation

Etymology 3

Noun

do

  1. Soft mutation of to.

Mutation


West Frisian

Etymology 1

From Old Frisian thū, from Proto-West Germanic *þū, from Proto-Germanic *þū, from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doː/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /də/

Pronoun

do

  1. (Clay) you; informal second-person singular pronoun
Inflection
Alternative forms
  • (Wood)
Further reading
  • “do (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2

From Old Frisian *dūve, from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doː/

Noun

do c (plural dowen, diminutive doke)

  1. pigeon, dove
Further reading
  • “do (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Italian do.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doː/

Noun

do c (plural do's)

  1. do (musical note)
Further reading
  • “do (IV)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Zazaki

Etymology

Related to Persian دوغ(duğ) and Tajik дуғ (duġ).

Noun

do ?

  1. airan

Zoogocho Zapotec

Noun

do

  1. mecate, rope made of maguey or hair fiber

References

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[15] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 367

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a party, celebration.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)