Drag in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does drag mean? Is drag a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is drag worth? drag how many points in Words With Friends? What does drag mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for drag

See how to calculate how many points for drag.

Is drag a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word drag is a Scrabble US word. The word drag is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

D2R1A1G2

Is drag a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word drag is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

D2R1A1G2

Is drag a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word drag is a Words With Friends word. The word drag is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

D2R1A1G3

Our tools

Valid words made from Drag

You can make 13 words from 'drag' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'drag'

DARG 6DRAG 6
GRAD 6 

3 letters words from 'drag'

ARD 4DAG 5
GAD 5GAR 4
RAD 4RAG 4

2 letters words from 'drag'

AD 3AG 3
AR 2DA 3

All 4 letters words made out of drag

drag rdag darg adrg radg ardg drga rdga dgra gdra rgda grda dagr adgr dgar gdar agdr gadr ragd argd rgad grad agrd gard

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word drag. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in drag.

Definitions and meaning of drag

drag

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɹæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English draggen (to drag), early Middle English dragen (to draw, carry), confluence of Old English dragan (to drag, draw, draw oneself, go, protract) and Old Norse draga (to draw, attract); both from Proto-Germanic *draganą (to draw, drag), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreǵʰ- (to draw, drag). Verb sense influenced due to association with the noun drag (that which is hauled or dragged), related to Low German dragge (a drag-anchor, grapnel). Cognate with Danish drægge (to dredge), Danish drage (to draw, attract), Swedish dragga (to drag, drag anchor, sweep), Swedish draga (to draw, go), Icelandic draga (to drag, pull). Doublet of draw.

Noun

drag (countable and uncountable, plural drags)

  1. (physics, uncountable) Resistance of a fluid to something moving through it.
    When designing cars, manufacturers have to take drag into consideration.
  2. (by analogy with above) Any force acting in opposition to the motion of an object.
    A high thrust-to-weight ratio helps a rocket to overcome the effects of gravity drag.
  3. (countable, foundry) The bottom part of a sand casting mold.
  4. (countable) A device dragged along the bottom of a body of water in search of something, e.g. a dead body, or in fishing.
  5. (countable, informal) A puff on a cigarette or joint.
  6. (countable, slang) Someone or something that is annoying or frustrating, or disappointing; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.
    Travelling to work in the rush hour is a real drag.
    • December 24, 1865, James David Forbes, letter to Dr. Symonds
      My lectures [] were only a pleasure to me, and no drag.
  7. (countable, slang) A long open horse-drawn carriage with transverse or side seats. [from mid-18th c.]
    • 1899, Kate Chopin, The Awakening:
      Alcee Arobin and Mrs. Highcamp called for her one bright afternoon in Arobin's drag.
  8. (countable, slang) Street, as in 'main drag'. [from mid-19th c.]
  9. (countable) The scent-path left by dragging a fox, or some other substance such as aniseed, for training hounds to follow scents.
    to run a drag
  10. (countable, snooker) A large amount of backspin on the cue ball, causing the cue ball to slow down.
  11. A heavy harrow for breaking up ground.
  12. A kind of sledge for conveying heavy objects; also, a kind of low car or handcart.
    a stone drag
  13. (metallurgy) The bottom part of a flask or mould, the upper part being the cope.
  14. (masonry) A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.
  15. (nautical) The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel.
  16. Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; especially, a canvas bag with a hooped mouth (drag sail), so used.
  17. A skid or shoe for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel.
  18. Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.
    • c. 1800, William Hazlitt, My First Acquaintance with Poets
      Had a drag in his walk.
  19. Witch house music. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  20. The last position in a line of hikers.
  21. (aviation, aerodynamics) The act of suppressing wind flow to slow an aircraft in flight, as by use of flaps when landing.
  22. (billiards) A push somewhat under the centre of the cue ball, causing it to follow the object ball a short way.
  23. A device for guiding wood to the saw.
  24. (historical) A mailcoach.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

drag (third-person singular simple present drags, present participle dragging, simple past and past participle dragged or (dialectal) drug)

  1. (transitive) To pull along a surface or through a medium, sometimes with difficulty.
  2. To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.
    • a. 1732', John Gay, epistle to a Lady
      Long, open panegyric drags at best.
  3. To act or proceed slowly or without enthusiasm; to be reluctant.
  4. To draw along (something burdensome); hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.
    • have dragged a lingering life
  5. To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.
    • 1883, William Clark Russell, Sailor’s Language:A collection of Sea-terms and Their Definitions
      A propeller is said to drag when the sails urge the vessel faster than the revolutions of the screw can propel her.
  6. (computing) To move (an item) on the computer display by means of a mouse or other input device.
  7. (chiefly of a vehicle) To unintentionally rub or scrape on a surface.
  8. (soccer) To hit or kick off target.
    • 2012, David Ornstein, BBC Sport, "Arsenal 5-2 Tottenham" [2], November 17
      Arsenal were struggling for any sort of rhythm and Aaron Lennon dragged an effort inches wide as Tottenham pressed for a second.
  9. To fish with a dragnet.
  10. To search for something, as a lost object or body, by dragging something along the bottom of a body of water.
  11. To break (land) by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow.
    Synonym: harrow
  12. (figuratively) To search exhaustively, as if with a dragnet.
    • while I dragged my brains for such a song
  13. (slang) To roast, say negative things about, or call attention to the flaws of (someone).
    Synonyms: criticize; see also Thesaurus:criticize
Derived terms
  • drag one's feet
  • draggle
  • dragline
  • updrag
  • what the cat dragged in
Related terms
  • dragnet
Translations

See also

  • (call attention to the flaws of): read

Etymology 2

Possibly from English drag (to pull along a surface) because of the sensation of long skirts trailing on the floor, or from Yiddish טראָגן(trogn, to wear)

Noun

drag (usually uncountable, plural drags)

  1. (uncountable, slang) Women's clothing worn by men for the purpose of entertainment. [from late 19th c.]
    He performed in drag.
  2. (countable, slang) A men's party attended in women's clothing. [from early 20th c.]
  3. (uncountable, slang) Any type of clothing or costume associated with a particular occupation or subculture.
    corporate drag
Derived terms
  • (women's clothing worn by men): drag daughter, drag king, drag queen, drag show
  • (any type of clothing): lally-drags
Translations

Verb

drag (third-person singular simple present drags, present participle dragging, simple past and past participle dragged)

  1. To perform as a drag queen or drag king.

References

  • Flight, 1913, p. 126 attributing to Archibald Low
  • “Drag” in Michael Quinion, Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds: Ingenious Tales of Words and Their Origins, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books in association with Penguin Books, 2004, →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • Gard, Grad, darg, gard, grad

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From the verb dra.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drɑːɡ/

Noun

drag n (definite singular draget, indefinite plural drag, definite plural draga)

  1. a pull, drag (the act of pulling, dragging)
    Han tok eit drag av sigaretten.
    He took a drag from his cigarette.
  2. hang (capability)
    Eg tek til å få draget på dette.
    I am starting to get the hang of this.
  3. feature (e.g. facial features)

Derived terms

  • vinddrag

References

  • “drag” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

From English drug.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drak/

Noun

drag m inan

  1. (slang) drug, recreational drug
    Synonym: narkotyk

Declension

Further reading

  • drag in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • drag in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowing from Bulgarian драг (drag), from Proto-Slavic *dorgъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [draɡ]

Adjective

drag m or n (feminine singular dragă, masculine plural dragi, feminine and neuter plural drage)

  1. dear

Usage notes

This word can be used as a term of address, in the same way as "dear", "honey", and "sweetie" are used in English.

Declension

Derived terms

  • dragoste
  • drăgălaș
  • drăguț

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dorgъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drâːɡ/

Adjective

drȃg (definite drȃgī, comparative drȁžī, Cyrillic spelling дра̑г)

  1. dear

Declension

Related terms

  • dražestan

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dorgъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dráːk/

Adjective

drȃg (comparative drȃžji, superlative nȁjdrȃžji)

  1. dear (loved; lovable)
  2. expensive

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading

  • drag”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

drag n

  1. feature, trait, characteristic
  2. lure, trolling spoon
  3. (chess) move, stroke

Declension

See also

  • dra

Verb

drag

  1. imperative of draga.

Anagrams

  • grad

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to pull along the ground.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)