Emo in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does emo mean? Is emo a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is emo worth? emo how many points in Words With Friends? What does emo mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for emo

See how to calculate how many points for emo.

Is emo a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word emo is a Scrabble US word. The word emo is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

E1M3O1

Is emo a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word emo is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

E1M3O1

Is emo a Words With Friends word?

The word emo is NOT a Words With Friends word.

Our tools

Valid words made from Emo

You can make 8 words from 'emo' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

3 letters words from 'emo'

EMO 5MOE 5

2 letters words from 'emo'

EM 4ME 4
MO 4OE 2
OM 4 

All 3 letters words made out of emo

emo meo eom oem moe ome

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word emo. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in emo.

Definitions and meaning of emo

emo

Etymology 1

Abbreviation of emocore.

Pronunciation

  • (US) enPR: ēʹ-mō IPA(key): /ˈi.moʊ/

Noun

emo (countable and uncountable, plural emos)

  1. (uncountable, music, early 1990s) A particular style of hardcore punk rock
  2. (countable, early 1990s) An individual of people associated with that subculture and musical style.
  3. (uncountable, music, late 1990s-current) Any form of guitar-driven alternative rock that is particularly or notably emotional
  4. (countable, late 1990s-current) An individual of people associated with a fashion or stereotype of that style of rock.
  5. (countable, 2000s) A young person who is considered to be over-emotional or stereotypically emo.

Translations

Etymology 2

Abbreviation of emotional.

Adjective

emo (comparative more emo, superlative most emo)

  1. (often derogatory) Emotional; sensitive.
  2. (informal, often derogatory) Depressed.
    • 2008, Vanity Fair (issue 578)
      Criticism drapes a black velvet cape across the puddle that interrupts the path to change, to be emo about it.
  3. Associated with youth subcultures embodying emotional sensitivity.
    • 2007, James A. Reinking, Robert Von Der Osten, Strategies for successful writing
      The one thing everyone agrees on is that they've never encountered a band that claimed to be emo.

Derived terms

  • emotard

Anagrams

  • 'ome, -ome, EOM, MOE, Meo, MoE, Moe, OEM, OME, moe, moé

Chinese

Etymology

From English emo.

Adjective

emo

  1. (neologism, Internet slang) emotional; depressed

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English emo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈiː.moː/
  • Hyphenation: emo

Noun

emo m (plural emo's)

  1. (uncountable) emo (form of guitar-driven alternative rock that is particularly or notably emotional; esp. a style of pop punk or hardcore punk)
  2. (countable) emo (individual associated with the above genres or subculture; young person who is considered to be over-emotional)

Esperanto

Etymology

From -ema +‎ -o.

Pronunciation

Noun

emo (accusative singular emon, plural emoj, accusative plural emojn)

  1. tendency, inclination

Synonyms

  • inklino
  • tendenco

Related terms

  • ema
  • emi

Finnish

Etymology

emä (mother (archaic), womb) +‎ -o

Noun

emo

  1. mother (animal female parent)
  2. (archaic or poetic) mother (human female parent)
  3. dam (female parent, generally regarding breeding of animals)
  4. queen (reproductive female animal in a hive)

Declension

Derived terms

  • emoalus
  • emolevy
  • emoyhtiö

Karao

Adverb

emo

  1. maybe

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *emō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁em- (to take, distribute), with excrescent p in ēmptum.

Cognate with Lithuanian im̃ti, Old Church Slavonic имѫ (imǫ) and possibly Old Armenian իմանամ (imanam). Possibly related to Proto-Indo-European *nem- (to take or give one's due), with its descendants English nim, Danish nemme, Dutch nemen, German nehmen, West Frisian nimme, Ancient Greek νέμω (némō).

Pronunciation

(Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.moː/, [ˈɛmoː]

  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈe.mo/, [ˈɛːmɔ]

Verb

emō (present infinitive emere, perfect active ēmī, supine ēmptum); third conjugation

  1. (transitive) I buy, purchase.
    Synonym: compārō
    Antonym: vēndō
  2. (figuratively) I acquire, procure.

Conjugation

Derived terms

References

  • emo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • emo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • emo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Further reading

  • emo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Spanish

Etymology

From English emo, short for emotional hardcore.

Noun

emo m (plural emos)

  1. emo

Swedish

Etymology

From English emo, short for emotional hardcore.

Noun

emo c or n

  1. emo (3), a genre of music and the fashion associated with it
  2. an emo (4), a fan of the previous

Declension


Zia

Etymology

From Proto-Trans-New Guinea *ambi (man, husband).

Noun

emo

  1. man

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a type of music combining traditional hard rock with personal and emotional lyrics.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)