Emo in Scrabble Dictionary

What does emo mean? Is emo a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is emo worth? emo how many points in Words With Friends? What does emo mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for emo

See how to calculate how many points for emo.

Is emo a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word emo is a Scrabble US word. The word emo is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

E1M3O1

Is emo a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word emo is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

E1M3O1

Is emo a Words With Friends word?

The word emo is NOT a Words With Friends word.

Our tools

Valid words made from Emo

You can make 7 words from 'emo' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'emo'

EMO 5MOE 5

2 letters words from 'emo'

EM 4ME 4
MO 4OE 2
OM 4 

All 3 letters words made out of emo

emo meo eom oem moe ome

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word emo. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in emo.

Definitions and meaning of emo

emo

Etymology

Abbreviation of emocore.

Pronunciation

  • (US) enPR: ēʹ-mō IPA(key): /ˈi.moʊ/

Noun

emo (countable and uncountable, plural emos)

  1. (uncountable, music, early 1990s) A particular style of hardcore punk rock
  2. (countable, early 1990s) An individual or group of people associated with that subculture and musical style.
  3. (uncountable, music, late 1990s-current) Any form of guitar-driven alternative rock that is particularly or notably emotional
  4. (countable, late 1990s-current) An individual or group of people associated with a fashion or stereotype of that style of rock.
  5. (countable, 2000s) A young person who is considered to be over-emotional or stereotypically emo.

Translations

Adjective

emo (comparative more emo, superlative most emo)

  1. (often derogatory) Emotional; sensitive.
  2. (informal, often derogatory) Depressed.
    • 2008, Vanity Fair (issue 578)
      Criticism drapes a black velvet cape across the puddle that interrupts the path to change, to be emo about it.
  3. Associated with youth subcultures embodying emotional sensitivity.
    • 2007, James A. Reinking, Robert Von Der Osten, Strategies for successful writing
      The one thing everyone agrees on is that they've never encountered a band that claimed to be emo.

Derived terms

  • emotard

Anagrams

  • 'ome, -ome, EOM, MOE, Meo, MoE, Moe, OEM, OME, moe, moé

Esperanto

Etymology

From -ema +‎ -o.

Pronunciation

Noun

emo (accusative singular emon, plural emoj, accusative plural emojn)

  1. tendency, inclination

Synonyms

  • inklino
  • tendenco

Related terms

  • ema
  • emi

Finnish

Etymology

From emä (mother (archaic), womb).

Noun

emo

  1. mother (animal female parent)
  2. (archaic or poetic) mother (human female parent)
  3. dam (female parent, generally regarding breeding of animals)
  4. queen (reproductive female animal in a hive)

Declension

Derived terms

  • emoalus
  • emolevy
  • emoyhtiö

Karao

Adverb

emo

  1. maybe

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *emō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁em- (to take, distribute), (with excrescent p in ēmptum). Cognate with Lithuanian im̃ti, Old Church Slavonic имѫ (imǫ) and possibly Old Armenian իմանամ (imanam). Possibly related to Proto-Indo-European *nem- (to take or give ones due), with its descendants English nim, Danish nemme, Dutch nemen, German nehmen, West Frisian nimme, Ancient Greek νέμω (némō).

Pronunciation

(Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.moː/, [ˈɛ.moː]

  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈe.mo/, [ˈɛː.mɔ]

Verb

emō (present infinitive emere, perfect active ēmī, supine ēmptum); third conjugation

  1. (transitive) I buy, purchase.
    Synonym: compārō
    Antonym: vēndō
  2. (figuratively) I acquire, procure.

Conjugation

Derived terms

References

  • emo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • emo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • emo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Further reading

  • emo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Spanish

Noun

emo m (plural emos)

  1. emo

Swedish

Noun

emo c or n

  1. emo (3), a genre of music and the fashion associated with it
  2. an emo (4), a fan of the previous

Declension


Source: wiktionary.org
  • a type of music combining traditional hard rock with personal and emotional lyrics.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)