End in Scrabble Dictionary

What does end mean? Is end a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is end worth? end how many points in Words With Friends? What does end mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for end

See how to calculate how many points for end.

Is end a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word end is a Scrabble US word. The word end is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

E1N1D2

Is end a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word end is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

E1N1D2

Is end a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word end is a Words With Friends word. The word end is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

E1N2D2

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Valid words made from End

You can make 7 words from 'end' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'end'

DEN 4END 4
NED 4 

2 letters words from 'end'

DE 3ED 3
EN 2NE 2

All 3 letters words made out of end

end ned edn den nde dne

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word end. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in end.

Definitions and meaning of end

end

Alternative forms

  • ende (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English ende, from Old English ende, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz (compare Dutch einde, German Ende, Norwegian ende, Swedish ände), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos (compare Old Irish ét (end, point), Latin antiae (forelock), Albanian anë (side), Ancient Greek ἀντίος (antíos, opposite), Sanskrit अन्त्य (antya, last)), from *h₂entíos (front, forehead). More at and and anti-.

The verb is from Middle English enden, endien, from Old English endian (to end, to make an end of, complete, finish, abolish, destroy, come to an end, die), from Proto-Germanic *andijōną (to finish, end), denominative from *andijaz.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕnd, IPA(key): /ɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Noun

end (plural ends)

  1. The terminal point of something in space or time.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      they followed him... into a sort of a central hall; out of which they could dimly see other long tunnel-like passages branching, passages mysterious and without apparent end.
  2. (by extension) The cessation of an effort, activity, state, or motion.
    Is there no end to this madness?
  3. (by extension) Death.
    He met a terrible end in the jungle.
    I hope the end comes quickly.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act II, scene i:
      Confound your hidden falsehood, and award / Either of you to be the other's end.
    • 1732, Alexander Pope, (epitaph) On Mr. Gay, in Westminster Abbey:
      A safe companion and and easy friend / Unblamed through life, lamented in thy end.
  4. The most extreme point of an object, especially one that is longer than it is wide.
    Hold the string at both ends.
    My father always sat at the end of the table.
  5. Result.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Act V, scene i:
      O that a man might know / The end of this day's business ere it come!
  6. A purpose, goal, or aim.
    • 1675, John Dryden, Aureng-zebe, Act III, scene i:
      But, losing her, the End of Living lose.
    • 1825, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Aids to Reflection in the Formation of a Manly Character, Aphorism VI, page 146:
      When every man is his own end, all things will come to a bad end.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.21:
      There is a long argument to prove that foreign conquest is not the end of the State, showing that many people took the imperialist view.
  7. (cricket) One of the two parts of the ground used as a descriptive name for half of the ground.
  8. (American football) The position at the end of either the offensive or defensive line, a tight end, a split end, a defensive end.
    • 1926, F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Penguin 2000, page 11:
      Her husband, among various physical accomplishments, had been one of the most powerful ends that ever played football at New Haven [...].
  9. (curling) A period of play in which each team throws eight rocks, two per player, in alternating fashion.
  10. (mathematics) An ideal point of a graph or other complex.
  11. That which is left; a remnant; a fragment; a scrap.
    odds and ends
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act I, scene iii:
      I clothe my naked villainy / With old odd ends stolen out of holy writ, / And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
  12. One of the yarns of the worsted warp in a Brussels carpet.
  13. (in the plural, slang, African-American Vernacular) Money.
    Don't give them your ends. You jack that shit!

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with "end": final, ultimate, deep, happy, etc.

Synonyms

  • (final point in space or time): conclusion, limit, terminus, termination
  • See also Thesaurus:goal

Antonyms

  • (final point of something): beginning, start

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: エンド

Translations

Verb

end (third-person singular simple present ends, present participle ending, simple past and past participle ended)

  1. (intransitive, ergative) to come to an end
  2. (transitive) To finish, terminate.
    • And on the seventh day God ended his worke []
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, scene iii:
      If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XLV, lines 7-8:
      But play the man, stand up and end you, / When your sickness is your soul.

Translations

Derived terms

  • ending
  • end up
  • never-ending
  • unending

Anagrams

  • DEN, DNE, Den, Den., NDE, NED, Ned, den, ned

Albanian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Albanian *antis/t, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂n̥t-jes/t (to plait, weave).

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (transitive) to weave
Derived terms
  • endem

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂endʰ-.

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (intransitive) to bloom, blossom
  2. (transitive) to flyblow
Related terms
  • endë

References


Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse enn, probably from Proto-Germanic *þan (then), like English than, German denn (than, for). For the loss of þ-, cf. Old Norse at (that) from Proto-Germanic *þat (that)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Conjunction

end

  1. than (in comparisons)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse enn, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Adverb

end

  1. still (archaic)
  2. (with interrogatives) no matter, ever
  3. even (in the modern language only in the combination end ikke "not even")

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛnˀ/

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch ende with apocope of the final -e.

Pronunciation

Noun

end n (plural enden, diminutive endje n)

  1. end
  2. travel distance
  3. a short length of something (such as a stick or a rope)

Synonyms

  • einde
  • eind

Usage notes

The form end is more informal than both einde and eind and is mainly used colloquially.

Anagrams

  • den

Estonian

Pronoun

end

  1. partitive singular of ise

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English ende.

Noun

end

  1. Alternative form of ende

Etymology 2

From Old English endian.

Verb

end

  1. Alternative form of enden

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

end

  1. imperative of enda and ende

Vilamovian

Etymology

From Old High German enti, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz.

Pronunciation

Noun

end n

  1. end

Antonyms

  • ofaong

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to terminate.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)