Et in Scrabble Dictionary

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Is et a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word et is a Scrabble US word. The word et is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

E1T1

Is et a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word et is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

E1T1

Is et a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word et is a Words With Friends word. The word et is worth 2 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

E1T1

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You can make 2 words from 'et' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


2 letters words from 'et'

ET 2TE 2

Definitions and meaning of et

et

Translingual

Initialism

et

  1. (airlines) Ethiopian Airlines' IATA airline designator
  2. (climate) Tundra climate's Köppen climate classification
  3. (Internet) .et, the country code top level domain (ccTLD) for Ethiopia
  4. (ISO) Estonian language's ISO 639 code
  5. (ISO) Ethiopia's ISO 3166-1 country code

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From French et, in turn from Latin et

Conjunction

et

  1. (obsolete except in fixed phrases) and
See also
  • et al., et alia, et aliae, et alii, et alios
  • et alibi
  • et seq.
  • &

Etymology 2

Verb

et

  1. (colloquial or dialectal) simple past tense and past participle of eat
    • 1896, Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain), Tom Sawyer, Detective [1]:
      So we got to talking together while he et his breakfast.
    • 1907, O. Henry, Seats of the Haughty [2]:
      'Boss,' says the cabby, 'I et a steak in that restaurant once. If you're real hungry, I advise you to try the saddle-shops first.'
    • 1919, Bess Streeter Aldrich, A Long-Distance Call From Jim:
      Well, I don't care if he does! I can remember the time when he et a good old-fashioned supper.
    • 1937, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit:
      Yer can't expect folk to stop here for ever just to be et by you and Bert.
    • 1946 February 18, Life magazine:
      It must have been somethin’ I et!
    • 1996, Dana Lyons, "Cows with Guns":
      They eat to grow, grow to die / Die to be et at the hamburger fry.

Anagrams

  • TE, te

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • etje

Etymology

Uncertain. Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *i̯et (to set out for; to strive). Compare Old Irish ét (thirst), Irish éad (eagerness, jealousy), Latin sitis (thirst), Tocharian A yat (reach, get). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *eus-ti-, cognate to Greek αἰτέω (aἰtéo, to demand, to beg). Orel suggests Proto-Albanian *alk-ti-, drawing comparisons to Lithuanian álkti (to be hungry), Proto-Slavic *olkati (id.), and Old High German ilgi (hunger).

Noun

et f (indefinite plural etje, definite singular etja, definite plural etjet)

  1. thirst

References


Catalan

Etymology

From Latin (accusative of ), from Proto-Indo-European *twé, *te, accusative of *túh₂ (you).

Pronoun

et (proclitic, contracted t', enclitic te, contracted enclitic 't)

  1. you, thee (singular, direct or indirect object)

Declension

Related terms

  • te
  • tu

Chuukese

Numeral

et

  1. (serial counting) one

Cimbrian

Etymology

From Middle High German iezuo, ieze, iezō, from Old High German iozou, perhaps from Proto-Germanic *juta. Cognate with German itzo (modern jetzt), English yet.

Adverb

et

  1. (Sette Comuni) now

Related terms

  • éttor

References

  • “et” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Danish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /et/, [ed̥]

Article

et (common en)

  1. a, an

Emilian

Etymology

From Latin (you).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /et/
  • Hyphenation: et

Pronoun

et (personal, nominative case)

  1. you (singular)

Alternative forms

  • Becomes t- before a vowel.
  • Becomes -et when acting as an enclitic (after a consonant).
  • Becomes -t when acting as an enclitic (after a vowel).

Related terms


Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *että (compare Finnish että), from the same Proto-Uralic root *e- (this) as Hungarian ez

Conjunction

et

  1. that
  2. to, in order to, so that, as to

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [eːʰt]

Verb

et

  1. singular imperative of eta

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈet/, [ˈe̞t̪]
  • Rhymes: -et
  • Syllabification: et

Etymology 1

Verb

et

  1. The second-person singular form of the negative verb (negation verb). The English translations include do not/don’t and not (with auxiliary verbs and be).
Usage notes
  • The negative verb is used with the connegative form of the main verb. That form is identical to the second-person singular imperative in the indicative present. The potential mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -ne-, and the conditional mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -isi-. In the indicative past, conditional past and potential past, the active past participle singular (ending -ut/-yt) is used. The connegative form of the main verb is always used without the personal suffix.
  • Usage of et:
  • Indicative:
  • Sinä näet. (You see.) -> Sinä et näe. (You do not see.)
  • Sinä näit. (You saw.) -> Sinä et nähnyt. (You did not see.)
  • Sinä olet nähnyt. (You have seen.) -> Sinä et ole nähnyt. (You have not seen.)
  • Sinä olit nähnyt. (You had seen.) -> Sinä et ollut nähnyt. (You had not seen.)
  • Conditional:
  • Sinä näkisit. (You would see.) -> Sinä et näkisi. (You would not see.)
  • Sinä olisit nähnyt. (You would have seen.) -> Sinä et olisi nähnyt. (You would not have seen.)
  • Potential:
  • Sinä nähnet. (You probably see.) -> Sinä et nähne. (You probably do not see.)
  • Sinä lienet nähnyt. (You have probably seen.) -> Sinä et liene nähnyt. (You have probably not seen.)
Conjugation
  • The negation verb has no infinitive form.
  • Indicative, conditional and potential moods use the indicative forms (stem e-), for which the verb is conjugated only in person.
  • In the imperative mood the negation verb has the stem äl-.
  • An archaic optative mood exists and is used mainly in poetry.

Etymology 2

Shortened form of että.

Conjunction

et

  1. (subordinating, colloquial) That.
Synonyms
  • että (standard Finnish)

Anagrams

  • Te, te

French

Etymology

From Middle French et.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /e/
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Homophones: ai, est

Conjunction

et

  1. and

Descendants

  • Mauritian Creole: e, ek
  • English: et

Usage notes

  • et is never subject to liaison with a following word, i.e. the t is never pronounced.

Further reading

  • “et” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • te

Ingrian

Verb

et

  1. second-person singular present of ei

Italian

Etymology

From Latin et (and; plus).

Conjunction

et

  1. (archaic, poetic) Alternative form of e

Latin

Alternative forms

  • &

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *éti. Cognate with Ancient Greek ἔτι (éti), Sanskrit अति (ati), Old English prefix ed- (anew, again). More at ed-.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /et/, [ɛt̪]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /et/, [ɛt̪]
  • Homophone: -et

Conjunction

et

  1. and
  2. (mathematics) plus
    Duo et duo sunt quattuor.
    Two plus two equals four.
  3. (literary) though, even if

Usage notes

  • When used in pairs, et...et may function like English both...and.

Quotations

  • For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:et.

Synonyms

  • (and): -que
  • (and): atque

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Eastern Romance:
    • Aromanian: e
    • Romanian: e
  • Franco-Provençal: et, e
  • Gallo-Italic:
    • Emilian: e
    • Ligurian: e
    • Piedmontese: e
    • Romagnol: e
  • Italo-Dalmatian:
    • Corsican: e
    • Dalmatian: e
    • Istriot: e
    • Italian: e, ed
    • Neapolitan: e
    • Sicilian: e
  • Old French: et, e
    • Middle French: et
      • French: et
        • Mauritian Creole: e, ek
        • English: et
    • Norman: et
    • Picard: et
    • Walloon: et, eyet
  • Old Occitan: e
    • Catalan: i
    • Occitan: e
  • Rhaeto-Romance:
    • Friulian: e
    • Ladin: y
    • Romansch: e, ed
  • Sardinian: e
  • Venetian: e
  • West Iberian:
    • Extremaduran: i
    • Mozarabic: ed
    • Navarro-Aragonese: [Term?]
      • Aragonese: y
    • Old Leonese: [Term?]
      • Asturian: y, ya
      • Leonese: y
      • Mirandese: i
    • Old Portuguese: e
      • Fala: i
      • Galician: e
      • Portuguese: e
        • Guinea-Bissau Creole: i, e
        • Indo-Portuguese: e
        • Kabuverdianu: y, i, e
        • Papiamentu: i, y
    • Old Spanish: é, e
      • Ladino: i
      • Spanish: y

See also

  • ampersand

Adverb

et (not comparable)

  1. also, too, besides, or likewise

References

  • et in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • et in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • et in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hit. Cognate with German es, English it, Dutch het.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /et/, [ət]
    • Rhymes: -ət

Pronoun

et

  1. Reduced form of of hatt (she, her; it)

Declension


Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /et/, /ət/

Pronoun

et

  1. Alternative form of het

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French et.

Conjunction

et

  1. and

Descendants

  • French: et
    • Mauritian Creole: e, ek
    • English: et

Middle Low German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛt/, /ət/

Pronoun

et

  1. Alternative form of it.

Declension


Norman

Etymology

From Old French et, from Latin et.

Pronunciation

Conjunction

et

  1. (Jersey) and

Noun

et m (plural ets)

  1. (Jersey) ampersand

Synonyms

  • ampèrsand

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse eitt, the nominative and accusative form of einn. Keep in mind the indefinite article was not used in Old Norse and was likely an influence from other Germanic languages.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛt/

Article

et n (neuter indefinite article used with neuter nouns)

  1. a, an (the two English language indefinite articles; Old English had three genders: masculine, feminine, and neuter like modern Bokmål and Nynorsk)
Related terms
  • ei (feminine indefinite article)
  • en (masculine indefinite article)
  • ett (neuter form of cardinal number)

See also

  • eit (Nynorsk) (neuter indefinite article)

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eːt/

Verb

et

  1. imperative of ete

References

  • “et” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

et

  1. present tense of eta and ete
  2. imperative of eta and ete

Novial

Conjunction

et ... e

  1. (coordinating) both ... and

Old French

Alternative forms

  • e

Etymology

From Latin et

Conjunction

et

  1. and
    c. 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
    Blanches et verz, bloes et jaunes
    Whites and greens, blues and yellows.

Descendants

  • Middle French: et
    • French: et
      • Mauritian Creole: e, ek
      • English: et
  • Norman: et
  • Picard: et
  • Walloon: et, eyet

Pipil

Etymology

Compare Classical Nahuatl etl (bean)

Pronunciation

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈeːt/
  • (Izalco) IPA(key): /ˈet/

Noun

ēt (plural ejēt)

  1. bean

Saterland Frisian

Alternative forms

  • 't

Etymology

From Old Frisian et, hit, from Proto-Germanic *hit.

Pronoun

et n

  1. it

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈet/, [ˈet̪]

Noun

et m (plural ets)

  1. ampersand

See also

  • y comercial f

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English eight.

Numeral

et

  1. eight

Usage notes

Used when counting; see also etpela.


Turkish

Etymology

From Old Turkic et (“meat”), from Proto-Turkic *et (meat).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛt/

Noun

et (definite accusative eti, plural etler)

  1. meat

Declension


Uzbek

Etymology

From Proto-Turkic *et.

Noun

et (plural etlar)

  1. flesh
  2. meat

Veps

Verb

et

  1. second-person plural present of ei

Walloon

Alternative forms

  • eyet

Etymology

From Old French et.

Conjunction

et

  1. and

Source: wiktionary.org