Fer in Scrabble Dictionary

What does fer mean? Is fer a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is fer worth? fer how many points in Words With Friends? What does fer mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for fer

See how to calculate how many points for fer.

Is fer a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word fer is a Scrabble US word. The word fer is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

F4E1R1

Is fer a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word fer is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

F4E1R1

Is fer a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word fer is a Words With Friends word. The word fer is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

F4E1R1

Our tools

Valid words made from Fer

You can make 7 words from 'fer' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'fer'

ERF 6FER 6
REF 6 

2 letters words from 'fer'

EF 5ER 2
FE 5RE 2

All 3 letters words made out of fer

fer efr fre rfe erf ref

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word fer. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in fer.

Definitions and meaning of fer

fer

Pronunciation

  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /fə(ɹ)/

Preposition

fer

  1. (dialectal, especially Britain) Eye dialect spelling of for.
    1997, J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, iv:
    ‘Got summat fer yeh here – I mighta sat on it at some point, but it’ll taste all right.’

References

  • fer in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • REF, RFE, Ref, Ref., erf, ref

Aragonese

Etymology

From Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō.

Verb

fer

  1. to make

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈfe/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfeɾ/

Etymology 1

From Old Occitan far, from Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō, from Proto-Italic *fakiō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set).

Verb

fer (first-person singular present faig, past participle fet)

  1. to make, produce
  2. to make up
  3. to do, to cause to be done
  4. to make do
  5. to give
  6. to lay
  7. to cause
  8. to go
  9. (impersonal, of weather) to be
  10. to play
  11. to measure
Conjugation
Derived terms
Related terms

Etymology 2

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan fèr), from Latin ferus (compare French fier, Spanish fiero), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰwer-.

Adjective

fer (feminine fera, masculine plural fers, feminine plural feres)

  1. wild (untamed, not domesticated)
Related terms

Further reading

  • “fer” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “fer” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “fer” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “fer” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feːɹ/
  • Homophone: ferð

Verb

fer

  1. third-person singular present of fara

French

Etymology

From Middle French fer, from Old French fer, from Latin ferrum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛʁ/
  • Homophones: fers, faire

Noun

fer m (plural fers)

  1. iron
  2. shoe (for horse); steel tip
  3. (golf) iron
  4. iron (appliance)
  5. (in the plural, archaic) irons, fetters

Derived terms

  • ferraille

Related terms

  • chemin de fer
  • fer à repasser

Descendants

  • Antillean Creole:
  • Haitian Creole:
  • Karipúna Creole French:
  • Louisiana Creole French: fèr,

Further reading

  • “fer” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Icelandic

Verb

fer

  1. inflection of fara:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person singular present indicative

Latin

Verb

fer

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of for
  2. second-person singular present active imperative of ferō

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish fer, from Proto-Celtic *wiros, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛr/

Noun

fer m (plural fir)

  1. man
  2. one (modified by an adjective or demonstrative, referring to an object or animal)
  3. used as a dummy noun to support a number, referring to a person, object or animal

Synonyms

  • dooinney

Derived terms

  • ard-er
  • fer ynsee

Mutation

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “fer”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Mauritian Creole

Etymology

From French faire.

Verb

fer (medial form fer)

  1. To make
  2. To do

Derived terms

  • kifer

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • feor, for, fur, feer, ver, veir, far

Etymology

From Old English feorr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛr/

Adjective

fer

  1. Far.

Descendants

  • English: far
  • Scots: faur

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French fer.

Noun

fer m (plural fers)

  1. iron (metal)
  2. (by extension) (iron) sword

Descendants

  • French: fer (see there for further descendants)

Norman

Alternative forms

  • faer (Guernsey)
  • (France, Jersey)

Etymology

From Old French fer, from Latin ferrum.

Noun

fer m (uncountable)

  1. (Sark) iron

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

fer

  1. present tense of fara and fare

Occitan

Verb

fer

  1. Alternative form of faire

Conjugation


Old French

Etymology 1

From Latin ferrum.

Noun

fer m (oblique plural fers, nominative singular fers, nominative plural fer)

  1. iron (metal)
  2. (by extension) sword (made of iron)
Descendants
  • Middle French: fer
    • French: fer (see there for further descendants)
  • Norman: (France, Jersey), faer (Guernsey), fer (Sark)
  • Walloon: fier

Etymology 2

From Latin ferum, accusative of ferus (wild)

Adjective

fer m (oblique and nominative feminine singular fere)

  1. cruel; harsh
  2. fierce; ferocious
Declension
Descendants
  • English: fierce (from the nominative singular fers)

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (fier)
  • fer on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Old High German

Etymology

From West Proto-Germanic *ferro-, whence also Old English feorr.

Adjective

fer

  1. remote

Adverb

fer

  1. far

References

  1. Braune, Wilhelm. Althochdeutsches Lesebuch, zusammengestellt und mit Glossar versehen

Old Irish

Etymology

From Primitive Irish *ᚃᚔᚏᚐᚄ (*viras), from Proto-Celtic *wiros, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognates include Latin vir, Sanskrit वीर (vīrá) and Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹𐍂 (wair).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʲer/

Noun

fer m (genitive fir, nominative plural fir)

  1. man
  2. husband
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 22c10

Declension

Derived terms

  • oínḟer

Descendants

  • Irish: fear
  • Manx: fer
  • Scottish Gaelic: fear

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “fer”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Old Saxon

Alternative forms

  • ferr, ferro

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛr/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *ferro, an old comparative form

Adverb

fer

  1. far
Descendants
  • Middle Low German: verre

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *ferro.

Adjective

fer

  1. far
Declension



Pennsylvania German

Etymology

Compare German für, Dutch voor, English for.

Preposition

fer

  1. for

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) far

Etymology

From Latin faciō, facere.

Verb

fer

  1. (Puter) to do, make

Scots

Alternative forms

  • fere, ferr

Pronunciation

  • (Hawick) IPA(key): /ˈfɛr/

Adjective

fer (comparative ferther, superlative ferthest)

  1. (South Scots) far

Derived terms

  • fer ahint
  • fer away
  • fer ben
  • ferness (farness)
  • ferrer (farther)
  • ferrest (farthest)
  • fer sichty (far-sighted)
  • ferther (farther)
  • ferthest (farthest)

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From English fair.

Adjective

fer (Cyrillic spelling фер)

  1. fair

Adverb

fer (Cyrillic spelling фер)

  1. fairly

Welsh

Adjective

fer

  1. Soft mutation of ber (short).

Mutation


Source: wiktionary.org
  • (dialect) for.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)