Fine in Scrabble Dictionary

What does fine mean? Is fine a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is fine worth? fine how many points in Words With Friends? What does fine mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for fine

See how to calculate how many points for fine.

Is fine a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word fine is a Scrabble US word. The word fine is worth 7 points in Scrabble:

F4I1N1E1

Is fine a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word fine is a Scrabble UK word and has 7 points:

F4I1N1E1

Is fine a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word fine is a Words With Friends word. The word fine is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

F4I1N2E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Fine

You can make 16 words from 'fine' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'fine'

FENI 7FINE 7
NEIF 7NIEF 7
NIFE 7 

3 letters words from 'fine'

FEN 6FIE 6
FIN 6NEF 6
NIE 3 

2 letters words from 'fine'

EF 5EN 2
FE 5IF 5
IN 2NE 2

All 4 letters words made out of fine

fine ifne fnie nfie infe nife fien ifen fein efin iefn eifn fnei nfei feni efni nefi enfi inef nief ienf einf neif enif

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word fine. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in fine.

Definitions and meaning of fine

fine

Etymology 1

From Middle English fin, fyn, from Old French fin (fine, minute, exact), of obscure origin, but probably derived from Latin fīnīre (to finish) and/or fīnis (boundary, limit, end), with an abstract sense of "fine" or "thin" also arising in many Romance languages (compare Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian fino). Doublet of fino.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɪn/,
  • Rhymes: -aɪn
  • (Tasmanian) IPA(key): /fæːn/

Adjective

fine (comparative finer, superlative finest)

  1. Senses referring to subjective quality.
    1. Of superior quality.
      • "A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there. []."
    2. (informal) Being acceptable, adequate, passable, or satisfactory.
    3. (informal) Good-looking, attractive.
    4. Subtle, delicately balanced or discriminated.
    5. (obsolete) Showy; overdecorated.
      • (Can we date this quote by Matthew Arnold and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
        He gratified them with occasional [] fine writing.
    6. Delicate; subtle; exquisite; artful; dexterous.
      • c. 1692, John Dryden, Discourse on Satire
        The nicest and most delicate touches of satire consist in fine raillery.
      • 1728, John Gay, The Beggar's Opera
        He has as fine a hand at picking a pocket as a woman.
    7. An answer often used to cover an unnecessary explanation, rather to avoid conflict or an argument. Saying "I'm fine" can be used to avoid inquiry when the speaker is not really okay.
  2. Senses referring to objective quality.
    1. Of a particular grade of quality, usually between very good and very fine, and below mint.
    2. (of weather) Sunny and not raining.
    3. Consisting of especially minute particulate; made up of particularly small pieces.
    4. Particularly slender; especially thin, narrow, or of small girth.
    5. Made of slender or thin filaments.
    6. Having a (specified) proportion of pure metal in its composition.
  3. (cricket) Behind the batsman and at a small angle to the line between the wickets.
  4. (obsolete) Subtle; thin; tenuous.
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
      The eye standeth in the finer medium and the object in the grosser.
Synonyms
  • (of superior quality): good, excellent
  • (of acceptable quality, informal): (being acceptable, adequate, passable, or satisfactory): all right, ok, o.k., okay, hunky-dory, kosher
  • (made up of particularly small pieces): fine-grained, powdered, powdery, pulverised, pulverized, small-grained
  • (made of slender or thin filaments): fine-threaded
Antonyms
  • (made up of particularly small pieces): coarse
  • (made of slender or thin filaments): coarse
Derived terms

See below.

Translations

Adverb

fine (comparative more fine, superlative most fine)

  1. Expression of (typically) reluctant agreement.
  2. Well, nicely, in a positive way.
    Everything worked out fine.
  3. (dated, dialect, colloquial) Finely; elegantly; delicately.
  4. (pool, billiards) In a manner so that the driven ball strikes the object ball so far to one side as to be barely deflected, the object ball being driven to one side.
Synonyms
  • (expression of agreement) all right, alright, OK, very well
Translations

Noun

fine (plural fines)

  1. Fine champagne; French brandy.
    • 1926, Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises, Scribner 2003, page 14:
      We had dined at l'Avenue's, and afterward went to the Café de Versailles for coffee. We had several fines after the coffee, and I said I must be going.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, page 18:
      He refilled his glass. ‘The fine is very good,’ he said.
  2. (usually in the plural) Something that is fine; fine particles.
    They filtered silt and fines out of the soil.
Usage notes

Particularly used in plural as fines of ground coffee beans in espresso making.

See also
  • filing

Verb

fine (third-person singular simple present fines, present participle fining, simple past and past participle fined)

  1. (transitive) To make finer, purer, or cleaner; to purify or clarify.
    to fine gold
    • (Can we date this quote by Hobbes and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      It hath been fined and refined by [] learned men.
  2. (intransitive) To become finer, purer, or cleaner.
  3. To make finer, or less coarse, as in bulk, texture, etc.
    to fine the soil
    (Can we find and add a quotation of L. H. Bailey to this entry?)
  4. To change by fine gradations.
    to fine down a ship's lines, i.e. to diminish her lines gradually
    • (Can we date this quote by Browning and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I often sate at home / On evenings, watching how they fined themselves / With gradual conscience to a perfect night.
  5. (transitive) To clarify (wine and beer) by filtration.
  6. (intransitive, dated) To become gradually fine; to diminish; to dwindle (with away, down, or off).
    • (Can we date this quote by W. C. Russel and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I watched her [the ship] [] gradually fining down in the westward until I lost sight of her hull.
Synonyms
  • (to make or become finer, purer, or cleaner): clarify, refine, purify
Related terms
  • (clarify by filtration): finings
Translations

Derived terms

Related terms

  • final
  • finite

Etymology 2

From Middle English fyn, fyne, from Old French fin, from Medieval Latin finis (a payment in settlement or tax).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɪn/,

Noun

fine (plural fines)

  1. A fee levied as punishment for breaking the law.
    The fine for jay-walking has gone from two dollars to thirty in the last fifteen years.
Synonyms
  • amercement
Translations

Verb

fine (third-person singular simple present fines, present participle fining, simple past and past participle fined)

  1. (transitive) To issue a fine as punishment to (someone).
    She was fined a thousand dollars for littering, but she appealed.
  2. (intransitive) To pay a fine.
    • (Can we date this quote by Hallam and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Men fined for the king's good will; or that he would remit his anger; women fined for leave to marry.
Synonyms
  • amerce
Translations

Related terms

  • finance

Etymology 3

From Italian fine (end).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fē'nā, IPA(key): /ˈfiːneɪ/

Noun

fine (plural fines)

  1. (music) The end of a musical composition.
  2. (music) The location in a musical score that indicates the end of the piece, particularly when the piece ends somewhere in the middle of the score due to a section of the music being repeated.
Usage notes

This word is virtually never used in speech and therefore essentially confined to musical notation.

Derived terms
  • da capo al fine=D.C. al fine

Etymology 4

From Middle English finen, fynen, from Old French finer, finir. See finish (transitive verb).

Verb

fine (third-person singular simple present fines, present participle fining, simple past and past participle fined)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To finish; to cease.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To cause to cease; to stop.

Noun

fine (plural fines)

  1. (obsolete) End; conclusion; termination; extinction.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      to see their fatal fine
  2. A final agreement concerning lands or rents between persons, as the lord and his vassal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spelman to this entry?)
  3. (Britain, law) A sum of money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease.

References

  • “fine” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.

Anagrams

  • Enif, Fein, NiFe, feni, ifen, neif, nief, nife

Asturian

Verb

fine

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of finar

Danish

Adjective

fine

  1. plural and definite singular attributive of fin

Esperanto

Pronunciation

Adverb

fine

  1. finally, at last; at the end
  2. in the final analysis, when all's said and done

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fin/
  • Rhymes: -in

Adjective

fine

  1. feminine singular of fin

Noun

fine f (plural fines)

  1. (typography) thin space, non-breakable space
  2. a number of high grade French brandies (usually AOC certified)

Further reading

  • “fine” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Futuna-Aniwa

Noun

fine

  1. woman, female (of any sort:)
    fine fau : young woman
    tiana fine : his wife
    tiona fine : his daughter
    fine riki : mistress

References

  • Arthur Capell, Futuna-Aniwa Dictionary, with Grammatical Introduction (1984)

Ido

Adverb

fine

  1. finally

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish fine, from Proto-Celtic *weniyā (family), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (desire); compare Old English wine (friend).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʲɪnʲə/

Noun

fine f (genitive singular fine, nominative plural finte)

  1. family group

Declension

Derived terms

  • Fine Gael

Mutation


Italian

Etymology

From Latin fīnis.

Pronunciation

Adjective

fine (masculine and feminine plural fini)

  1. thin
    Synonym: sottile
  2. fine
  3. refined
    Synonym: elegante

Adjective

fine

  1. feminine plural of fino

Noun

fine f (plural fini)

  1. end
    Synonyms: conclusione, finale, termine
    Antonyms: inizio, principio

Noun

fine m (plural fini)

  1. aim, purpose, end
    Synonyms: scopo, obiettivo

Related terms

  • alla fine
  • alla fin fine
  • al fine di
  • in fin dei conti
  • finale
  • finezza
  • finire
  • fino
  • fine settimana
  • infine
  • senza fine

Anagrams

  • feni

Latin

Noun

fīne

  1. ablative singular of fīnis

References

  • fine in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish faigen (sheath, scabbard), from Latin vāgīna. Cognate with Irish faighin and Scottish Gaelic faighean.

Noun

fine f

  1. quiver
  2. sheath, scabbard
  3. vagina

Synonyms

  • cuinnag
  • pihtt, pitt

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian finda, which derives from Proto-Germanic *finþaną. Cognates include Föhr-Amrum North Frisian finj and West Frisian fine.

Verb

fine

  1. (Mooring Dialect) to find

Conjugation


Norwegian Bokmål

Adjective

fine

  1. definite singular of fin
  2. plural of fin

Norwegian Nynorsk

Adjective

fine

  1. definite singular of fin
  2. plural of fin

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *weniyā.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʲinʲe/

Noun

fine f

  1. family, kin, group of people of common descent
  2. clan, tribe, race

Inflection

Descendants

  • Irish: fine

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “fine”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Portuguese

Verb

fine

  1. inflection of finar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Romanian

Etymology

From Italian fine, and partly French fin.

Noun

fine f (uncountable)

  1. (literary) end

Synonyms

  • sfârșit

Derived terms

  • în fine

Spanish

Verb

fine

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of finir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of finir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of finir.

Swedish

Adjective

fine

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of fin.

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian finda, from Proto-Germanic *finþaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pent-

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfinə/

Verb

fine

  1. to find
  2. to decide that, to form the opinion that

Inflection

Further reading

  • “fine (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to incur a monetary penalty.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)