Fire in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does fire mean? Is fire a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is fire worth? fire how many points in Words With Friends? What does fire mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for fire

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Is fire a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word fire is a Scrabble US word. The word fire is worth 7 points in Scrabble:

F4I1R1E1

Is fire a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word fire is a Scrabble UK word and has 7 points:

F4I1R1E1

Is fire a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word fire is a Words With Friends word. The word fire is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

F4I1R1E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Fire

You can make 19 words from 'fire' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

4 letters words from 'fire'

FIER 7FIRE 7
REFI 7REIF 7
RIFE 7 

3 letters words from 'fire'

ERF 6FER 6
FIE 6FIR 6
IRE 3REF 6
REI 3RIF 6

2 letters words from 'fire'

EF 5ER 2
FE 5IF 5
RE 2 

All 4 letters words made out of fire

fire ifre frie rfie irfe rife fier ifer feir efir iefr eifr frei rfei feri efri refi erfi iref rief ierf eirf reif erif

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word fire. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in fire.

Definitions and meaning of fire

fire

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfaɪə(ɹ)/
  • (Upper RP Triphthong Smoothing) IPA(key): /ˈfaə(ɹ)/, /ˈfaː(ɹ)/, /ˈfɑə(ɹ)/, /ˈfɑəː(ɹ)/
  • (General American) enPR: fīʹər, fīr, IPA(key): /ˈfaɪɚ/, [ˈfaɪɚ]
  • (Southern American English, Appalachia) IPA(key): [ˈfäːɚ]
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈfɑeə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English fyr, from Old English fȳr (fire), from Proto-West Germanic *fuir, from *fuïr, a regularised form of Proto-Germanic *fōr (fire) (compare Saterland Frisian Fjuur, West Frisian fjoer, Dutch vuur, Low German Füer, German Feuer, Danish fyr), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *péh₂wr̥.

Compare Hittite 𒉺𒄴𒄯 (paḫḫur), Umbrian pir, Tocharian A/B por/puwar, Czech pýř (hot ashes), Ancient Greek πῦρ (pûr, fire), and Armenian հուր (hur, fire)). This was an inanimate noun whose animate counterpart was Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥gʷnis (see ignite). Cognate to pyre.

Alternative forms

  • fier (archaic)

Noun

fire (countable and uncountable, plural fires)

  1. (uncountable) A (usually self-sustaining) chemical reaction involving the bonding of oxygen with carbon or other fuel, with the production of heat and the presence of flame or smouldering.
  2. (countable) An instance of this chemical reaction, especially when intentionally created and maintained in a specific location to a useful end (such as a campfire or a hearth fire).
  3. (countable) The occurrence, often accidental, of fire in a certain place, causing damage and danger.
  4. (uncountable, alchemy, philosophy) The aforementioned chemical reaction of burning, considered one of the Classical elements or basic elements of alchemy.
  5. (countable, Britain) A heater or stove used in place of a real fire (such as an electric fire).
  6. (countable) The elements necessary to start a fire.
  7. (uncountable) The bullets or other projectiles fired from a gun or other ranged weapon.
  8. (astronautics) An instance of firing one or more rocket engines.
  9. Strength of passion, whether love or hate.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, An Answer to some Considerations, the Spirit of Martin Luther and the Original of the Reformation
      He had fire in his temper.
  10. Liveliness of imagination or fancy; intellectual and moral enthusiasm.
  11. Splendour; brilliancy; lustre; hence, a star.
  12. A severe trial; anything inflaming or provoking.
  13. Red coloration in a piece of opal.
Synonyms
  • blaze
  • conflagration
  • inferno
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ファイヤー (faiyā)
  • Sranan Tongo: faya
Translations

See fire/translations § Noun.

Etymology 2

From Middle English firen, fyren, furen, from Old English fȳrian (to make a fire), from the noun (see above). Cognate with Old Frisian fioria (to light a fire), Saterland Frisian fjuurje (to fire), Middle Dutch vûren, vueren, vieren (to set fire), Dutch vuren (to fire, shoot), Old High German fiuren (to ignite, set on fire), German feuern (to fire).

Verb

fire (third-person singular simple present fires, present participle firing, simple past and past participle fired)

  1. (transitive) To set (something, often a building) on fire.
    • 1907, Jack London, The Iron Heel
      It was long a question of debate, whether the burning of the South Side ghetto was accidental, or whether it was done by the Mercenaries; but it is definitely settled now that the ghetto was fired by the Mercenaries under orders from their chiefs.
  2. (transitive) To heat as with fire, but without setting on fire, as ceramic, metal objects, etc.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! Certainly it made a brave picture. I had seen similar ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills, [] a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.
  3. (transitive) To drive away by setting a fire.
  4. (transitive) To terminate the employment contract of (an employee), especially for cause (such as misconduct or poor performance).
    Antonym: hire
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p.226:
      The first, obvious choice was hysterical and fantastic Blanche – had there not been her timidity, her fear of being ‘fired [].
  5. (transitive) To shoot (a gun, rocket/missile, or analogous device).
  6. (astronautics) To operate a rocket engine to produce thrust.
  7. (transitive, mining) To set off an explosive in a mine.
  8. (intransitive) To shoot a gun, cannon, or similar weapon.
    Synonyms: open fire, shoot
  9. (transitive, sports) To shoot; to attempt to score a goal.
  10. (intransitive, physiology) To cause an action potential in a cell.
  11. (transitive) To forcibly direct (something).
  12. (transitive, intransitive, computer sciences, software engineering) To initiate an event (by means of an event handler).
  13. To inflame; to irritate, as the passions.
    • Love had fired my mind.
  14. To animate; to give life or spirit to.
  15. To feed or serve the fire of.
  16. (transitive) To light up as if by fire; to illuminate.
  17. (transitive, farriery) To cauterize.
  18. (intransitive, dated) To catch fire; to be kindled.
  19. (intransitive, dated) To be irritated or inflamed with passion.
Synonyms
  • (set on fire): See set on fire
  • (transitive, shoot): let off, loose (archery), shoot
  • (terminate the employment of): dehire, dismiss, give one's cards, give the boot, give the elbow, give the old heave-ho, let go, make redundant, sack, terminate, throw out, unhire; See also Thesaurus:lay off.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Alternative forms

  • fye (nonstandard, Internet slang)

Adjective

fire (not comparable)

  1. (slang) Amazing; excellent.
Translations

Further reading

  • fire on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Fire in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • -fier, Fier, Frie, fier, refi, reif, rief, rife

Asturian

Verb

fire

  1. third-person singular present indicative of firir

Crimean Tatar

Noun

fire

  1. shrinkage, loss
  2. scrap

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse fjórir, from Proto-Germanic *fedwōr, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres (four).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiːrə/, [ˈfiːɐ]

Numeral

fire

  1. four
Usage notes

In compounds: fir-.

Etymology 2

From Middle Low German fīren, from French virer (bear, veer).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiːrə/, [ˈfiːɐ]

Verb

fire (imperative fir, infinitive at fire, present tense firer, past tense firede, perfect tense har firet)

  1. to lower something fixed to a rope or something similar
    • 1871, Jens Andreas Friis, Lappisk Mythologi, page 138
      Saa gik han hen og firede Stenen og Vidietouget ned i Hullet.
      Then he went [to the hole] and lowered the rock and the wicker rope down into the hole.
    • 2014, Teddy Vork, Diget, Tellerup A/S →ISBN
      Han satte sig på knæ, famlede sig frem til tovet og vendte sig rundt så han havde ryggen til hullet, drejede overkroppen bagud, firede faklen ned i hullet.
      He kneeled, fumbled his way to the rope and turned around, such that his back was to the hole, twisted his torso backwards, lowered the torch into the hole.
Conjugation

Italian

Etymology

From Latin fīerī (to become, be), present active infinitive of fīō. Compare Romanian fi.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfi.re/
  • Hyphenation: fì‧re

Verb

fìre (third-person only, third-person singular present fìa, no third-person singular past historic, no past participle)

  1. (northern Italy, obsolete) to be
    Synonym: essere

Usage notes

  • The only forms attested outside of ancient Northern Italian literature are the future fia (third-person singular) and fiano (third-person plural).

References

  • fire in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams

  • ferì, refi

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Danish fire, Old Norse fjórir, from Proto-Germanic *fedwōr, from *kʷetwṓr, the neuter form of Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfiːɾə/

Numeral

fire

  1. four
Derived terms
Related terms
  • fjerde (ordinal)

Etymology 2

From French virer, via Middle Low German firen

Verb

fire (imperative fir, present tense firer, passive fires, simple past fira or firet or firte, past participle fira or firet or firt, present participle firende)

  1. to slacken, ease
  2. to lower (a flag)

References

  • “fire” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse fjórir, via Danish fire.

Etymology 1

From Danish fire, Old Norse fjórir, from Proto-Germanic *fedwōr, from *kʷetwṓr, the neuter form of Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˈfiːɾə/

Numeral

fire

  1. four
Derived terms
Related terms
  • fjerde (ordinal)

Etymology 2

From French virer, via Middle Low German firen.

Verb

fire

  1. to slacken, ease
  2. to lower (e.g. a flag)

References

  • “fire” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology 1

Noun

fire n

  1. plural of fir

Etymology 2

From fi +‎ -re.

Noun

fire f (plural firi)

  1. essence, substance, nature
    Synonym: natură
  2. character, temper, disposition
    Synonyms: caracter, temperament
  3. mind
    Synonym: minte
Declension
Related terms

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from Greek Φύρα (Fýra)

Noun

fire (definite accusative fireyi, plural fireler)

  1. wastage
  2. outage
  3. shrinkage, loss, loss in weight, decrease
  4. turnover
  5. ullage
  6. leakage
  7. waste, tret, deficiency

Declension


Source: wiktionary.org
  • to project by discharging from a gun.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)