Gad in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does gad mean? Is gad a Scrabble word?

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Is gad a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word gad is a Scrabble US word. The word gad is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

G2A1D2

Is gad a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word gad is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

G2A1D2

Is gad a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word gad is a Words With Friends word. The word gad is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

G3A1D2

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Valid words made from Gad

You can make 5 words from 'gad' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

3 letters words from 'gad'

DAG 5GAD 5

2 letters words from 'gad'

AD 3AG 3
DA 3 

All 3 letters words made out of gad

gad agd gda dga adg dag

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word gad. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in gad.

Definitions and meaning of gad

gad

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡæd/
  • Rhymes: -æd

Etymology 1

Taboo deformation of God.

Interjection

gad

  1. An exclamatory interjection roughly equivalent to by God, goodness gracious, for goodness' sake.
Derived terms
  • egads
  • egad

Etymology 2

From Middle English gadden (to hurry, to rush about).

Verb

gad (third-person singular simple present gads, present participle gadding, simple past and past participle gadded)

  1. (intransitive) To move from one location to another in an apparently random and frivolous manner.
    Synonym: gallivant
    • 1852, Alice Cary, Clovernook ....
      This, I suppose, is the virgin who abideth still in the house with you. She is not given, I hope, to gadding overmuch, nor to vain and foolish decorations of her person with ear-rings and finger-rings, and crisping-pins: for such are unprofitable, yea, abominable.
    • 1903, Howard Pyle, The Story of King Arthur and His Knights, Part III, Chapter Fourth, page 123
      So when he saw King Arthur he said: "Thou knave! Wherefore didst thou quit thy work to go a-gadding?"
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 19, [1]
      But there is no telling the sacrament, seldom if in any case revealed to the gadding world, wherever under circumstances at all akin to those here attempted to be set forth, two of great Nature's nobler order embrace.
Derived terms
  • gadabout
  • gaddish, gaddishness
Translations

Noun

gad (plural gads)

  1. One who roams about idly; a gadabout.

Etymology 3

From Middle English gade (a fool, rascal, scoundrel; bastard), from Old English gāda (fellow, companion, comrade, associate), related to Proto-West Germanic *gaduling (kinsman). Cognate with Dutch gade (spouse), German Gatte (male spouse, husband). See also gadling.

Alternative forms

  • ged, gade

Noun

gad (plural gads)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, derogatory) A greedy and/or stupid person.
    • 1913, George Gordon, The Auld Clay Biggin
      Ye greedy ged, ye have taken the very breath out o' me.

References

  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Etymology 4

From Middle English gad, gadde, borrowed from Old Norse gaddr (goad, spike), from Proto-Germanic *gazdaz (spike, rod, stake).

Noun

gad (plural gads)

  1. A sharp-pointed object; a goad.
    Synonym: goad
    • 1885, Detroit Free Press., December 17
      Twain finds his voice after a short search for it and when he impels it forward it is a good, strong, steady voice in harness until the driver becomes absent-minded, when it stops to rest, and then the gad must be used to drive it on again.
  2. (obsolete) A metal bar.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book XV:
      they sette uppon hym and drew oute their swerdys to have slayne hym – but there wolde no swerde byghte on hym more than uppon a gadde of steele, for the Hyghe Lorde which he served, He hym preserved.
    • 1677-1684, Joseph Moxon, Mechanick exercises
      Flemish steel [] some in bars and some in gads.
  3. (especially mining) A pointed metal tool for breaking or chiselling rock.
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 327:
      Frank was able to keep his eyes open long enough to check his bed with a miner's gad and douse the electric lamp
  4. (dated, metallurgy) An indeterminate measure of metal produced by a furnace, perhaps equivalent to the bloom, perhaps weighing around 100 pounds.
    • 1957, H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry, p. 146.
      Twice a day a 'gad' of iron, i.e., a bloom weighing 1 cwt. was produced, which took from six to seven hours.
  5. A spike on a gauntlet; a gadling.
    Synonyms: gadling, spike
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairholt to this entry?)
  6. (Britain, US, dialect) A rod or stick, such as a fishing rod, a measuring rod, or a rod used to drive cattle with.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • gadfly

Translations

Anagrams

  • DAG, GDA, dag

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡʌd/
  • Hyphenation: gad

Noun

gád m (plural gadoowá f or gaditté f or gadoodá f)

  1. song
  2. sung poetry

Declension

References

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “gad”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡ̊æˀð], [ˈɡ̊æðˀ]

Verb

gad

  1. past tense of gide

Irish

Etymology 1

From Old Irish gat.

Noun

gad m (genitive singular gaid, nominative plural gaid)

  1. withe
  2. string, rope, band
  3. Obsolete spelling of goid
  4. Obsolete spelling of cad
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Irish gataid (takes away, removes, pulls or snatches away; takes away (something from someone), deprives of; of carrying off booty; takes away the expectation, hope of (something, an event); steals).

Verb

gad (present analytic gadann, future analytic gadfaidh, verbal noun gad, past participle gadta)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, literary) take away, remove; snatch, carry off
  2. Alternative form of goid
Conjugation

Mutation

Further reading

  • "gad" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • “gad” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 344.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gat”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gataid (‘take away, steal’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “gad” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “gad” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ (serpent)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡat/

Noun

gad m

  1. (archaic) venomous snake, viper, adder
  2. poison, venom

Declension

Animate declension (‘venomous snake, viper, adder’):

Inanimate declension (‘poison, venom’):

Further reading

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “gad”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • gad in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Navajo

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kàt/, [kàt], [kɣàt]

Noun

gad

  1. juniper, cedar (especially Juniperus deppeana)

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡat/

Noun

gad m anim

  1. reptile (cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Reptilia)
  2. (Cieszyn Silesia, Upper Silesia, Bukovina) snake (reptile of the suborder Serpentes)

Declension

Derived terms

  • gadzi (adjective)

Noun

gad m pers

  1. scoundrel (villain)

Declension

Further reading

  • gad in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gad in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kat̪/

Pronoun

gad

  1. you (informal singular, direct object)

Usage notes

  • Lenites the following word.

Related terms

Noun

gad m (genitive singular gaid, plural gaid or gadan)

  1. withy, withe

Conjunction

gad

  1. Alternative form of ged

Mutation


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ

Noun

gȁd m (Cyrillic spelling га̏д)

  1. a repulsive person
  2. scoundrel
  3. cad
  4. asshole
  5. snake; lizard

Declension


Somali

Verb

gad

  1. to buy

Torres Strait Creole

Noun

gad

  1. (eastern dialect) an immature coconut

Usage notes

Gad or smol koknat is the third stage of coconut growth. It is preceded by giru (eastern dialect) or musu koknat (western dialect), and followed by kopespes.


Veps

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

gad

  1. snake

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Volapük

Noun

gad (nominative plural gads)

  1. garden

Declension

Derived terms


Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡaːd/

Etymology 1

Noun

gad

  1. Soft mutation of cad.

Mutation

Etymology 2

Alternative forms

  • gadawa (colloquial)

Verb

gad

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperative of gadael

Mutation


Western Apache

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kàt]

Noun

gad

  1. cedar or juniper tree, especially Juniperus deppeana.

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to roam about restlessly.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)