Gate in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does gate mean? Is gate a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is gate worth? gate how many points in Words With Friends? What does gate mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for gate

See how to calculate how many points for gate.

Is gate a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word gate is a Scrabble US word. The word gate is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

G2A1T1E1

Is gate a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word gate is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

G2A1T1E1

Is gate a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word gate is a Words With Friends word. The word gate is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

G3A1T1E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Gate

You can make 22 words from 'gate' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'gate'

GATE 5GEAT 5
GETA 5 

3 letters words from 'gate'

AGE 4ATE 3
EAT 3ETA 3
GAE 4GAT 4
GET 4TAE 3
TAG 4TEA 3
TEG 4 

2 letters words from 'gate'

AE 2AG 3
AT 2EA 2
ET 2TA 2
TE 2 

All 4 letters words made out of gate

gate agte gtae tgae atge tage gaet aget geat egat aegt eagt gtea tgea geta egta tega etga ateg taeg aetg eatg teag etag

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word gate. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in gate.

Definitions and meaning of gate

gate

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English gate, gat, ȝate, ȝeat, from Old English gæt, gat, ġeat (a gate, door), from Proto-Germanic *gatą (hole, opening) (compare Old Norse gat, Swedish and Dutch gat, Low German Gaat, Gööt).

Alternative forms

  • yate (obsolete or dialectal)

Noun

gate (plural gates)

  1. A doorlike structure outside a house.
  2. Doorway, opening, or passage in a fence or wall.
  3. Movable barrier.
    The gate in front of the railroad crossing went up after the train had passed.
  4. (computing) A logical pathway made up of switches which turn on or off. Examples are and, or, nand, etc.
  5. (cricket) The gap between a batsman's bat and pad.
  6. The amount of money made by selling tickets to a concert or a sports event.
  7. (flow cytometry) A line that separates particle type-clusters on two-dimensional dot plots.
  8. Passageway (as in an air terminal) where passengers can embark or disembark.
  9. (electronics) The controlling terminal of a field effect transistor (FET).
  10. In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.
  11. (metalworking) The channel or opening through which metal is poured into the mould; the ingate.
  12. The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue or sullage piece. Also written geat and git.
  13. (cinematography) A mechanism, in a film camera and projector, that holds each frame momentarily stationary behind the aperture.
  14. A tally mark consisting of four vertical bars crossed by a diagonal, representing a count of five.
Synonyms
  • (computing): logic gate
  • (opening in a wall): doorway, entrance, passage
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

gate (third-person singular simple present gates, present participle gating, simple past and past participle gated)

  1. To keep something inside by means of a closed gate.
  2. To punish, especially a child or teenager, by not allowing them to go out.
    Synonym: ground
    • 1971, E. M. Forster, Maurice, Penguin, 1972, Chapter 13, p. 72,[1]
      “I’ve missed two lectures already,” remarked Maurice, who was breakfasting in his pyjamas.
      “Cut them all — he’ll only gate you.”
  3. (biochemistry) To open a closed ion channel.
  4. (transitive) To furnish with a gate.
  5. (transitive) To turn (an image intensifier) on and off selectively as needed, or to avoid damage. See autogating.

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ. Cognate with Danish gade, Swedish gata, German Gasse (lane). Doublet of gait.

Noun

gate (plural gates)

  1. (now Scotland, Northern England) A way, path.
  2. (obsolete) A journey.
  3. (Scotland, Northern England) A street; now used especially as a combining form to make the name of a street e.g. "Briggate" (a common street name in the north of England meaning "Bridge Street") or Kirkgate meaning "Church Street".
  4. (Britain, Scotland, dialect, archaic) Manner; gait.

References

Anagrams

  • EGTA, ETag, Geat, e-tag, geat, geta

Afrikaans

Noun

gate

  1. plural of gat

Anjam

Noun

gate

  1. head

References

  • Robert Rucker, Anjam Organised Phonology Data (2000), p. 2

Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English gate.

Noun

gate m (plural gates, diminutive gatetje n)

  1. airport gate

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English Watergate.

Noun

gate m (plural gates, diminutive gatetje n)

  1. (in compounds) scandal

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French gâter (to spoil).

Verb

gate

  1. spoil

Mauritian Creole

Etymology 1

From English gate

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeːt/

Noun

gate

  1. gate
  2. entrance door

Etymology 2

From French gâté (“pampered”)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡate/

Noun

gate

  1. darling, sweetheart
    Synonym: cheri

Adjective

gate

  1. spoilt
  2. stale, expired

Etymology 3

From French gâter

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡate/

Verb

gate (medial form gat)

  • to spoil, ruin
    Synonyms: abime, rwine

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English ġeat, ġet, gat, from Proto-West Germanic *gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą.

Alternative forms

  • gat, yeate, yate, ȝat, ȝæt, ȝeat, ȝate, ȝet, ȝhate

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡaːt/, /ɡat/, /jɛt/, /jat/, /jaːt/

Noun

gate (plural gates or gaten or gate)

  1. An entryway or entrance to a settlement or building; a gateway.
  2. A gate (door barring an entrance or gap in a fence)
  3. (figuratively) A method or way of doing something or getting somewhere.
  4. (figuratively) Any kind of entrance or entryway; e.g. a crossing through mountains.
Derived terms
  • flodegate
  • Newgate
Descendants
  • English: gate, yate
  • Scots: yett, yet, ȝett, ȝet
  • Yola: gaaute, yeat
  • Middle Irish: *geta
    • Irish: geata
    • Manx: giat
    • Scottish Gaelic: geata
  • Welsh: gât, giât, iet
References
  • “gāte, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-12.

Etymology 2

From Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ.

Alternative forms

  • gat, gatt, gatte, gait

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡaːt(ə)/, /ˈɡat(ə)/

Noun

gate (plural gates)

  1. A way, path or avenue; a trail or route.
  2. A voyage, adventure or leaving; one's course on the road.
  3. The way which one acts; one's mode of behaviour:
    1. A way or procedure for doing something; a method.
    2. A moral or religious path; the course of one's life.
    3. (Late ME) One's lifestyle or demeanour; the way one chooses to act.
    4. (Late ME) Gait; the way one walks.
Descendants
  • English: gate, gait
  • Scots: gate
References
  • “gā̆te, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-12.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse gata

Noun

gate f or m (definite singular gata or gaten, indefinite plural gater, definite plural gatene)

  1. a street

Derived terms

References

  • “gate” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse gata

Noun

gate f (definite singular gata, indefinite plural gater, definite plural gatene)

  1. a street

Derived terms

References

  • “gate” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English gate.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈɡejt͡ʃ/

Noun

gate m (plural gates)

  1. (electronics) gate (circuit that implements a logical operation)
    Synonym: (more common) porta

Etymology 2

Noun

gate m (plural gates)

  1. (India) mountain
    Synonyms: monte, montanha

Etymology 3

Verb

gate

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of gatar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of gatar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of gatar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of gatar

Scots

Alternative forms

  • gait
  • gjet (sco, Shetland)

Etymology

Borrowed from Old Norse gata.

Noun

gate (plural gates)

  1. street, way, road, path

Ternate

Etymology

Compare Tidore gate.

Noun

gate

  1. heart
  2. liver

Synonyms

  • nyinga

References

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001). A Descriptive Study of the Language of Ternate, the Northern Moluccas, Indonesia. University of Pittsburgh

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to supply with a gate.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)