Hic in Scrabble Dictionary

What does hic mean? Is hic a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is hic worth? hic how many points in Words With Friends? What does hic mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for hic

See how to calculate how many points for hic.

Is hic a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word hic is a Scrabble US word. The word hic is worth 8 points in Scrabble:

H4I1C3

Is hic a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word hic is a Scrabble UK word and has 8 points:

H4I1C3

Is hic a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word hic is a Words With Friends word. The word hic is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

H3I1C4

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Valid words made from Hic

You can make 5 words from 'hic' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'hic'

CHI 8HIC 8
ICH 8 

2 letters words from 'hic'

CH 7HI 5

All 3 letters words made out of hic

hic ihc hci chi ich cih

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word hic. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in hic.

Definitions and meaning of hic

hic

Etymology

Onomatopoeic

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /hɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk
  • Homophone: hick

Interjection

hic

  1. An approximation to the sound of a hiccup, used e.g. to indicate drunkenness.
    "This wine - hic! - tasted good."

Translations

Anagrams

  • CHI, CIH, Ch'i, Chi, Chi., HCI, ICH, Ich, chi, ich

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • hicu

Etymology

From Latin fīcus. Compare Spanish higo.

Noun

hic m (plural hits)

  1. fig (tree) or fig (fruit)

Related terms

  • hicã

French

Etymology

From Latin hic est quæstio (here is the question).

Pronunciation

  • (aspirated h) IPA(key): /ik/

Noun

hic m (uncountable)

  1. snag, hitch, catch, kink, problem
    Voilà le hic. — Here's the problem.

Interjection

hic

  1. hic! (indicating a hiccup)
    Ce vin, hic ! sent bon.
    This wine—hic!—tastes good.

Further reading

  • “hic” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Interlingua

Adverb

hic

  1. here

Latin

Alternative forms

  • ic (Vulgar or Late Latin, Pompeian inscriptions)

Etymology 1

From Proto-Italic *hek(e), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰi-ḱe (this, here), from *gʰi + *ḱe (here). First element cognate with Ancient Greek γε (ge, intensifying particle), Russian же (že, intensifying particle), Czech že (that, conjunction). Second element cognate with Latin cis (on this side), ce-dō, Ancient Greek ἐ-κε-ῖνος (e-ke-înos, that), Old Irish (here), Gothic 𐌷𐌹𐌼𐌼𐌰 (himma, to this). More at he, here.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /hik/, [hɪk]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ik/

Before a vowel, the final [k] of the Classical pronunciation is lengthened. (This is also the case for nominative and accusative hoc.)

Determiner

hic (feminine haec, neuter hoc); first/second-declension determiner (hic-type)

  1. (determiner) this; these (in the plural)
  2. (pronoun) this one; this (thing); these ones (in the plural); these (things); he, she, it
Declension
  • In Medieval Latin pl. fem. hae through some vulgar form, *haeae, is replaced by hee.

First/second-declension adjective (hic-type).

Usage notes

  • This demonstrative determiner/pronoun is used to refer to a person or thing, or persons or things, near the speaker. It contrasts with ille (that), which refers to people or things far from the speaker and the listener, and iste (this/that), which refers to people or things near the listener.
  • As Latin had no person pronouns specifically meaning "he", "she" or "it", any of ille, iste, hic or (most frequently) is could assume that function.
  • In Vulgar Latin, phonetic changes tended to eliminate both the initial h and final c, leaving nothing but a bare vowel. Consequently, this demonstrative gradually disappeared and was replaced with iste, which originally meant "that (near you)". (This left only a two-term system of demonstratives in comparison with Latin's three-term system, but the gap was filled in some areas by pressing ipse into service as a middle demonstrative. Spanish, for example, has este (this) < Latin iste, ese (that (near you)) < Latin ipse, and aquel (that (far from you and me)) < Latin eccum ille.) This process was gradual, and the neuter form hoc survived the longest (it still survives, for example, in Catalan ho). Other forms sometimes survived in compound expressions, e.g. Portuguese agora (now) < Latin hāc horā.
Derived terms
  • hāc
  • hīc
  • hinc
  • hūc

Related terms

Etymology 2

From older heic, adverb (locative) from hic.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /hiːk/
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ik/

Adverb

hīc (not comparable)

  1. here

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • hic in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hic in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • hic in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Middle English

Pronoun

hic

  1. Alternative form of I

References

  • “ich (pron.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 5 May 2018.

Vietnamese

Alternative forms

  • hix

Etymology

Onomatopoeia, from the sobbing sound. Compare hức (sob; hic).

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [hïk̟̚˧˦]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [hɨt̚˦˧˥]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [hɨt̚˦˥]
  • Phonetic: hích

Interjection

hic

  1. (onomatopoeia) sob
  2. (comics, Internet slang) dang; darn; aw man; man
  3. (onomatopoeia) Synonym of hức (hic)

Source: wiktionary.org
  • used to represent a hiccup.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)