Lap in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does lap mean? Is lap a Scrabble word?

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Is lap a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word lap is a Scrabble US word. The word lap is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

L1A1P3

Is lap a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word lap is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

L1A1P3

Is lap a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word lap is a Words With Friends word. The word lap is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

L2A1P4

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Valid words made from Lap

You can make 6 words from 'lap' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'lap'

ALP 5LAP 5
PAL 5 

2 letters words from 'lap'

AL 2LA 2
PA 4 

All 3 letters words made out of lap

lap alp lpa pla apl pal

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word lap. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in lap.

Definitions and meaning of lap

lap

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /læp/
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English lappe, from Old English læppa (skirt or flap of a garment), from Proto-Germanic *lappô (cloth; rag), of uncertain origin, possibly Proto-Indo-European *leb- (to hang loosely). Cognate with Dutch lap (cloth; rag), German Lappen (cloth; lobe; flap), Icelandic leppur (rag; patch).

Noun

lap (plural laps)

  1. The loose part of a coat; the lower part of a garment that plays loosely; a skirt; an apron.
  2. An edge; a border; a hem, as of cloth.
  3. The part of the clothing that lies on the knees or thighs when one sits down; that part of the person thus covered
  4. (figurative) a place of rearing and fostering
  5. The upper legs of a seated person.
  6. (archaic, euphemistic) The female pudenda. [17th century]
  7. (construction) A component that overlaps or covers any portion of itself or of an adjacent component.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

lap (third-person singular simple present laps, present participle lapping, simple past and past participle lapped)

  1. (transitive) To enfold; to hold as in one's lap; to cherish.
    • Her garment spreads, and laps him in the fold.
  2. (transitive) To rest or recline in a lap, or as in a lap.
    • a. 1839, Winthrop Mackworth Praed, Gog
      to lap his head on lady's breast

References

Etymology 2

From Middle English lappen (to fold, wrap) from earlier wlappen (to fold, wrap), from Old English *wlappan, *wlæppan, *wlappian (to wrap), from Proto-Germanic *wlapp-, *wrapp- (to wrap, fold, roll up, turn), from Proto-Indo-European *werb- (to bend, turn). Cognate with Middle Dutch lappen (to wrap up, embrace), dialectal Danish vravle (to wind), Old Italian goluppare (to wrap, fold up) (from Germanic). Doublet of wrap. Also related to envelop, develop.

The sense of "to get a lap ahead (of someone) on a track" is from 1847, on notion of "overlapping." The noun meaning "a turn around a track" (1861) is from this sense.

Verb

lap (third-person singular simple present laps, present participle lapping, simple past and past participle lapped)

  1. (transitive) To fold; to bend and lay over or on something.
  2. (transitive) to wrap around, enwrap, wrap up
    • About the paper [] I lapped several times a slender thread of very black silk.
  3. (transitive) to envelop, enfold
  4. (intransitive) to wind around
  5. (transitive) To place or lay (one thing) so as to overlap another.
  6. (transitive) To polish, e.g., a surface, until smooth.
  7. (intransitive) To be turned or folded; to lie partly on or over something; to overlap.
    • 1681, Nehemiah Grew, Musaeum Regalis Societatis
      The upper wings are opacous [] ; at their hinder ends, where they lap over, transparent, like the wing of a fly.
  8. (transitive) To overtake a straggler in a race by completing one more whole lap than the straggler.
  9. To cut or polish with a lap, as glass, gems, cutlery, etc.
Derived terms
  • belap
  • lapper
  • overlap
  • umbelap
Translations

Noun

lap (plural laps)

  1. The act or process of lapping.
  2. That part of any substance or fixture which extends over, or lies upon, or by the side of, a part of another.
  3. The state or condition of being in part extended over or by the side of something else; or the extent of the overlapping.
  4. The amount by which a slide valve at its half stroke overlaps a port in the seat, being equal to the distance the valve must move from its mid stroke position in order to begin to open the port. Used alone, lap refers to outside lap (see below).
  5. (sports) One circuit around a race track, or one traversal down and then back the length of a pool
  6. In card playing and other games, the points won in excess of the number necessary to complete a game; — so called when they are counted in the score of the following game.
  7. A sheet, layer, or bat, of cotton fiber prepared for the carding machine.
  8. A piece of brass, lead, or other soft metal, used to hold a cutting or polishing powder in cutting glass, gems, etc. or in polishing cutlery, etc. It is usually in the form of a wheel or disk that revolves on a vertical axis.
Derived terms
  • lap of honor/lap of honour
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English lappen, from Old English lapian, from Proto-Germanic *lapōną, *lapjaną (to lick; lap), from imitative Proto-Indo-European *leh₂b- (to lap, lick); akin to Old High German laffen (to lick), Old Norse lepja, Danish labe, Old Saxon lepil, German Löffel (spoon). Cognate with Latin lambere (lick). French lamper is a loanword from German. Compare Danish leffe, dialect German läffeln.

Verb

lap (third-person singular simple present laps, present participle lapping, simple past and past participle lapped)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To take (liquid) into the mouth with the tongue; to lick up with a quick motion of the tongue.
    • 1644, Kenelm Digby, Two Treatises
      The dogs by the River Nilus's side, being thirsty, lap hastily [] as they run along the shore.
  2. (intransitive, of water) To wash against a surface with a splashing sound; to swash.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Passing of Arthur
      I heard the ripple washing in the reeds, / And the wild water lapping on the crag.
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • “laper” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  • Bratchet, A. (1873) , “laper”, in Kitchin, G. W., transl., Etymological dictionary of the French language (Clarendon Press Series), 1st edition, London: Oxford/MacMillan and Co.

Etymology 4

Noun

lap (plural laps)

  1. (medicine, colloquial) Clipping of laparoscopy.

Adjective

lap (not comparable)

  1. (medicine, colloquial) Clipping of laparoscopic.

Anagrams

  • ALP, APL, LPA, PAL, PLA, Pal, Pla, alp, pal

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch lap, from Middle Dutch lap, from Old Dutch lap.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lap/

Noun

lap (plural lappe, diminutive lappie)

  1. A patch, a rag, a piece of cloth.
  2. A plot, a tract (of ground).

Derived terms

  • lappieskombers

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *lapa. An onomatopoeic cognate to Greek λάπτω (lápto, to lick), Lithuanian lapth (to swallow greedily), Proto-Slavic *lopati (to eat greedily), and the like.

Verb

lap (first-person singular past tense lapa)

  1. to slurp, lap up

Derived terms

  • lëpij
  • lëpis

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑp/
  • Hyphenation: lap
  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch lap, lappe, from Old Dutch lap, from Proto-Germanic *lappa-, *lappô (rag, cloth), of uncertain origin, possibly Proto-Indo-European *leb- (to hang loosely). Cognate with German Lappen.

Noun

lap m (plural lappen, diminutive lapje n)

  1. A rag, a piece of cloth.
  2. A patch, a piece of cloth.
  3. A slice of meat.
  4. A plot, a tract (of ground).
Derived terms
  • baklap
  • lapjeskat
  • lapjespoes
  • lappendeken
  • lappenmand
  • lappenpop
  • poetslap
  • schaamlap
  • schoenlap
  • spatlap
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: lap
  • Indonesian: lap
  • Papiamentu: lapi
See also
  • (rag): vod

References

Etymology 2

Probably from sense 1, which dialectically meant "blow, strike" and evolved into "stupidity." Or, possibly from an original sense of "lap up," referring to sloppy children, for which see English lap.

Noun

lap m (plural lappen, diminutive lapje n)

  1. (obsolete, except in compounds) A bloke, dude, bum; especially a drunk or objectionable one.
Derived terms
  • dronkenlap
  • smeerlap
  • zuiplap

Further reading

  • van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010) , “lap2”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Interjection

lap

  1. (chiefly Belgium) exclamation of dismay, disappointment

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

lap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lappen
  2. imperative of lappen

Anagrams

  • pal

Hungarian

Etymology

From Proto-Uralic *lappɜ (flat surface), either directly or as a back-formation from lapos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ ˈlɒp]
  • Hyphenation: lap
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Noun

lap (plural lapok)

  1. sheet (thin, flat piece of any solid material)
  2. sheet (piece of paper, usually rectangular, that has been prepared for writing, printing or other uses)
  3. (proscribed, archaic) page (one side of a written or printed paper sheet)
  4. newspaper, magazine, periodical (publication issued regularly)
  5. greeting card, postcard (decorated card made of thick paper that is sent or given to someone)
  6. playing card (one piece out of a pack of cards used to play games)
  7. (computing) tab (virtual space of a window where one of many simultaneously opened documents is displayed)
  8. (geometry) face (any of the flat bounding surfaces of a polyhedron)
    Synonym: oldal (a less technical term in this sense)
  9. (in the possessive) top (the flat, horizontal surface of a table or desk)
  10. (in the possessive) flat (flat side of something, as opposed to the edge)

Declension

Derived terms

References


Mòcheno

Etymology

From Middle High German loup, from Old High German loup, from Proto-West Germanic *laub, from Proto-Germanic *laubą (leaf). Cognate with German Laub, English leaf.

Noun

lap n

  1. leaf

References

  • “lap” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English laugh.

Noun

lap

  1. laughter

Verb

lap

  1. to laugh

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to extend beyond some limit.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)