Leed in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does leed mean? Is leed a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is leed worth? leed how many points in Words With Friends? What does leed mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for leed

See how to calculate how many points for leed.

Is leed a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word leed is a Scrabble US word. The word leed is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

L1E1E1D2

Is leed a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word leed is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

L1E1E1D2

Is leed a Words With Friends word?

The word leed is NOT a Words With Friends word.

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Valid words made from Leed

You can make 14 words from 'leed' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'leed'

DELE 5LEDE 5
LEED 5 

3 letters words from 'leed'

DEE 4DEL 4
EEL 3ELD 4
LED 4LEE 3

2 letters words from 'leed'

DE 3ED 3
EE 2EL 2

All 4 letters words made out of leed

leed eled leed eled eeld eeld lede elde ldee dlee edle dele lede elde ldee dlee edle dele eedl eedl edel deel edel deel

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word leed. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in leed.

Definitions and meaning of leed

leed

Etymology 1

From Middle English leed, lede, shortened variant of leden (language), from Old English lēoden (popular or national language, native tongue), from Old English lēod (people, nation). Cognate with Scots leed (language). More at lede.

Noun

leed (plural leeds)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Language; tongue.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A national tongue (in contrast to a foreign language).
  3. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) The speech of a person or class of persons; form of speech; talk; utterance; manner of speaking or writing; phraseology; diction.

Related terms

  • lede

Etymology 2

From Middle English lede, led, leod, variant of Middle English leth, leoth (song, poem), from Old English lēoþ (song, poem, ode, lay, verse), from Proto-Germanic *leuþą (song, lay, praise), from Proto-Indo-European *lēw- (to sound, resound, sing out). Cognate with Dutch lied (song), German Lied (song).

Noun

leed (plural leeds)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A strain in a rhyme, song, or poem; refrain; flow.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A constant or repeated line or verse; theme.
  3. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) Patter; rigmarole.
Related terms
  • lied

Anagrams

  • LEDE, deel, dele, lede

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eːt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch lêet, from Old Dutch *lēth, from Proto-Germanic *laiþą.

Noun

leed n (uncountable)

  1. grief, sorrow
  2. harm

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch lêet, from Old Dutch lēth, from Proto-Germanic *laiþaz.

Adjective

leed (comparative leder, superlative leedst)

  1. (Belgium) angry
  2. sad
Inflection

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

leed

  1. singular past indicative of lijden

Anagrams

  • deel, dele, edel, lede

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Old High German leid. Cognate with German leid, Dutch leed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /leːt/
  • Rhymes: -eːt
  • Homophone: Leed

Adverb

leed

  1. (in expressions) grievous; cumbersome
    Ech sinn et leed. — “I’m fed up with it.”
    Dat deet mer leed. — “I’m sorry.”
    Hatt deet mer leed. — “I pity her.”

Related terms

  • Leed

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • lede, leod, leode, also leude, lude

Etymology 1

From Old English lēode (people, men), plural of lēod (man, person) (masc.), also “nation, people group, ethnicity, nationality” (fem.), akin to Old Frisian liod, Old Saxon liud, Old Norse ljóðr, lýðr, Old High German liut, Dutch lieden, German Leute (people). Akin to Old English lēodan (to grow, spring forth).

Noun

leed (plural common noun and collective noun, plural leeds or leeden)

  1. People; persons collectively.
  2. Countrymen, compatriots; vassals.
  3. Man, person; human being.
  4. Race, nation; nationality; kindred.

Etymology 2

Unknown

Noun

leed

  1. A copper kettle or caldron.
    • 14th century, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales
      That stemed as a forneys of a leed

Scots

Alternative forms

  • lede, leid, led, leide, leyd, leyde, leit

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /liːd/

Etymology

From earlier leed, from Middle English lede, reduced form of leden, leoden (language), from Old English lēoden (national language", literally, "of the people), from Old English lēode (people). More at lede.

Alternative forms

  • leid, lied

Noun

leed (plural leeds)

  1. language
Usage notes
  • Commonly understood language, either literally or metaphorically:
    A daena speak the leed.

Spanish

Verb

leed

  1. (Spain) Informal second-person plural (vosotros or vosotras) affirmative imperative form of leer.

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English led, from Old English lēad, from Proto-West Germanic *laud.

Noun

leed

  1. lead

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN

Source: wiktionary.org
  • LEE, (Scots) to lie, make a false statement.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)