Leet in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does leet mean? Is leet a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is leet worth? leet how many points in Words With Friends? What does leet mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for leet

See how to calculate how many points for leet.

Is leet a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word leet is a Scrabble US word. The word leet is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

L1E1E1T1

Is leet a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word leet is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

L1E1E1T1

Is leet a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word leet is a Words With Friends word. The word leet is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

L2E1E1T1

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Valid words made from Leet

You can make 14 words from 'leet' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'leet'

LEET 4TEEL 4
TELE 4 

3 letters words from 'leet'

EEL 3ELT 3
LEE 3LET 3
TEE 3TEL 3

2 letters words from 'leet'

EE 2EL 2
ET 2TE 2

All 4 letters words made out of leet

leet elet leet elet eelt eelt lete elte ltee tlee etle tele lete elte ltee tlee etle tele eetl eetl etel teel etel teel

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word leet. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in leet.

Definitions and meaning of leet

leet

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /liːt/
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Scots leet, leit, of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Old French lite, litte, variant of liste (list); or from Old Norse leiti, hleyti (a share, portion) (compare Old English hlēte (share, lot)); or an aphaeretic shortening of French élite.

Noun

leet (plural leets)

  1. (Scotland) A portion or list, especially a list of candidates for an office; also the candidates themselves.

Etymology 2

From Old English lēt, past tense of lǣtan (to let).

Verb

leet

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense of let

Etymology 3

Originated 1400–50 from late Middle English lete (meeting), from Anglo-Norman lete and Medieval Latin leta (Anglo-Latin), possibly from Old English ġelǣte (crossroads).

Noun

leet (plural leets)

  1. (Britain, obsolete) A regular court, more specifically a court-leet, in which certain lords had jurisdiction over local disputes, or the physical area of this jurisdiction.

Etymology 4

Jamieson mentions the alternative spellings lyth, lythe, laid, and laith, and connects it to a erb lythe (to shelter), as it "is frequently caught ... in deep holes among the rocks".

Noun

leet (plural leets)

  1. (Britain) The European pollock.
    • 1854, William Hughes, A Practical Treatise on the Choice and Cookery of Fish [1] (Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans), page 27:
      The whiting pollock sometimes, par excellence is styled pollock only. On the Yorkshire coast it is called a leet, and in Scotland a lythe.

Etymology 5

From Middle English lete, from Old English ġelǣt, ġelǣte, from Proto-Germanic *galētą, *lētą. More at leat.

Noun

leet (plural leets)

  1. (obsolete) A place where roads meet or cross; intersection
  2. Alternative form of leat (watercourse)

Etymology 6

An aphetic form of elite, respelled according to leetspeak conventions.

Alternative forms

  • 1337, eleet, el337, l33t, 31337, and 3l33t.

Noun

leet (uncountable)

  1. (Internet slang, dated) Abbreviation of leetspeak.

Adjective

leet (comparative leeter, superlative leetest)

  1. Of or relating to leetspeak.
  2. (slang) Possessing outstanding skill in a field; expert, masterful.
  3. (slang) Having superior social rank over others; upper class, elite.
  4. (slang) Awesome, typically to describe a feat of skill; cool, sweet.
    • 2006, Maximum PC (Autumn, page 26)
      Powered by leetness! You can have the leetest hardware imaginable in your gaming rig, but it won't matter if you run it with a cheap power supply.

References

  • “leet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • "leet" in the Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, MICRA, 1996, 1998.

Anagrams

  • Teel, Tele, teel, tele, tele-

Finnish

Noun

leet

  1. nominative plural of lee

Anagrams

  • tele, tele-

Luxembourgish

Verb

leet

  1. inflection of leeden:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person plural present indicative
    3. second-person singular/plural imperative

Verb

leet

  1. inflection of leeën:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person plural present indicative
    3. second-person plural imperative

Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch lēth, from Proto-Germanic *laiþaz.

Adjective

lêet

  1. loathsome, abhorrent
Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms
  • leit (Limburgish)
Descendants
  • Dutch: leed

Etymology 2

From Old Dutch *lēth, from Proto-Germanic *laiþą.

Noun

lêet n

  1. damage, harm
  2. suffering, sadness
  3. sickness
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms
  • leit (Limburgish)
Descendants
  • Dutch: leed
  • Limburgish: leidj

Further reading

  • “leet (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “leet (III)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929) , “leet (I)”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929) , “leet (II)”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

leet

  1. simple past and past participle of lee

Alternative forms

  • lea

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

leet n

  1. definite singular of le

Anagrams

  • elte, etle, lete, tele

Saterland Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian let, from Proto-Germanic *lataz. More at late.

Adjective

leet

  1. late

Related terms

  • lääst
  • leeter

Scots

Etymology

Compare Old English hlēte (share, lot).

Noun

leet (plural leets)

  1. a list

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a former English court for petty offenses.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)