Let in Scrabble Dictionary

What does let mean? Is let a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is let worth? let how many points in Words With Friends? What does let mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for let

See how to calculate how many points for let.

Is let a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word let is a Scrabble US word. The word let is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

L1E1T1

Is let a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word let is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

L1E1T1

Is let a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word let is a Words With Friends word. The word let is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

L2E1T1

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Valid words made from Let

You can make 6 words from 'let' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'let'

ELT 3LET 3
TEL 3 

2 letters words from 'let'

EL 2ET 2
TE 2 

All 3 letters words made out of let

let elt lte tle etl tel

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word let. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in let.

Definitions and meaning of let

let

Alternative forms

  • lett (archaic)
  • lettest (2nd person singular simple present and simple past; archaic)
  • letteth (3rd person singular simple present; archaic)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt
  • Homophone: Lett

Etymology 1

From Middle English leten, læten, from Old English lǣtan (to allow, let go, bequeath, leave, rent), from Proto-Germanic *lētaną (to leave behind, allow), from Proto-Indo-European *lēd- (to let, leave behind). Cognate with Scots lat, lete (to let, leave), North Frisian lete (to let), West Frisian litte (to let), Dutch laten (to let, leave), German lassen (to let, leave, allow), Swedish låta (to let, allow, leave), Icelandic láta (to let), Albanian (to allow, let, leave) and partially related to French laisser (to let).

Verb

let (third-person singular simple present lets, present participle letting, simple past let or (obsolete) leet, past participle let or (rare) letten)

  1. (transitive) To allow to, not to prevent (+ infinitive, but usually without to).
    • Pharaoh said, I will let you go.
    • 1971, Ursula K. Le Guin, The Tombs of Atuan
      He could not be let die of thirst there alone in the dark.
  2. (transitive) To leave.
    • (Can we date this quote by Edmund Spenser and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Yet neither spins nor cards, ne cares nor frets, / But to her mother Nature all her care she lets.
  3. (transitive) To allow the release of (a fluid).
  4. (transitive) To allow possession of (a property etc.) in exchange for rent.
  5. (transitive) To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; often with out.
  6. (transitive) Used to introduce an imperative in the first or third person.
  7. (transitive, obsolete except with know) To cause (+ bare infinitive).
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter iv, in Le Morte Darthur, book IV:
      Soo within a whyle kynge Pellinore cam with a grete hoost / and salewed the peple and the kyng / and ther was grete ioye made on euery syde / Thenne the kyng lete serche how moche people of his party ther was slayne / And ther were founde but lytel past two honderd men slayne and viij knyȝtes of the table round in their pauelions
    • 1818, John Keats, "To—":
      Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, / Long hours have to and fro let creep the sand [].
Usage notes
  • The use of “let” to introduce an imperative may sometimes be confused with its use, as its own imperative, in the sense of “to allow”. For example, the sentence “Let me go to the store.” could either be a second-person imperative of “let” (addressing someone who might prevent the speaker from going to the store) or a first-person singular imperative of “go” (not implying any such preventer).
Synonyms
  • (to allow): allow, permit
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

let (plural lets)

  1. The allowing of possession of a property etc. in exchange for rent.

Etymology 2

From Middle English letten (to hinder, delay), from Old English lettan (to hinder, delay”; literally, “to make late), from Proto-Germanic *latjaną. Akin to Old English latian (to delay), Dutch letten, Old English læt (late). More at late, delay.

Verb

let (third-person singular simple present lets, present participle letting, simple past letted, past participle let)

  1. (archaic) To hinder, prevent, impede, hamper, cumber; to obstruct (someone or something).
    • He who now letteth will let, until he be taken out of the way.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Lancelot and Elaine
      Mine ancient wound is hardly whole, / And lets me from the saddle.
  2. (obsolete) To prevent someone from doing something; also to prevent something from happening.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts 8:
      And as they went on their waye, they cam unto a certayne water, and the gelded man sayde: Se here is water, what shall lett me to be baptised?
  3. (obsolete) To tarry or delay.
    • (Can we date this quote by Chaucer and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      No longer would he let.

Noun

let (plural lets)

  1. An obstacle or hindrance.
    • 1567 Arthur Golding; Ovid's Metamorphoses Bk. 3 Lines 60-1
      And Cadmus saw his campanie make tarience in that sort
      He marveld what should be their let, and went to seeke them out.
    • (Can we date this quote by Latimer and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Consider whether your doings be to the let of your salvation or not.
  2. (tennis) The hindrance caused by the net during serve, only if the ball falls legally.
Derived terms
  • without let or hindrance
Translations
References
  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Anagrams

  • ELT, ETL, LTE, TEL, TLE, Tel., elt, tel

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɛt]
  • Homophones: led

Etymology 1

From letět.

Noun

let m

  1. flight (the act of flying)
Declension
Derived terms
  • letový

Etymology 2

Noun

let

  1. genitive plural of léto

Further reading

  • let in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • let in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse léttr, from Proto-Germanic *linhtaz, cognate with Swedish lätt, English light and German leicht.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɛd̥]

Adjective

let (plural and definite singular attributive lette)

  1. light (not heavy)
  2. easy
  3. slight
  4. mild
Inflection
Synonyms
  • (easy): nem, enkel
References
  • “let,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Adverb

let

  1. lightly
  2. easily
  3. slightly
  4. mildly

Etymology 2

Abbreviation of letmælk.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɛd̥]

Noun

let c (singular definite letten, plural indefinite let)

  1. low-fat milk
Inflection
References
  • “let,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɛd̥]

Verb

let

  1. imperative of lette

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈleˀd̥]

Verb

let

  1. past participle of le

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Verb

let

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of letten
  2. imperative of letten

Anagrams

  • tel

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English let.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɛt/

Interjection

let

  1. (tennis) indicates a let on service

Further reading

  • “let” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin lēctus, perfect passive participle of legō.

Verb

let

  1. past participle of lei- read

Gothic

Romanization

lēt

  1. Romanization of 𐌻𐌴𐍄

Irish

Alternative forms

  • led

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lʲɛt̪ˠ/

Contraction

let (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster) Contraction of le do (with your sg).

Related terms


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse litr (colour), related to líta (to see)

Noun

let m (definite singular leten, indefinite plural leter, definite plural letene)

  1. colour
Synonyms
  • farge
Derived terms
  • hamlet

Etymology 2

Verb

let

  1. imperative of lete

References

  • “let” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse litr (colour), related to líta (to see)

Noun

let m (definite singular leten, indefinite plural leter or letar, definite plural letene or letane)

  1. colour
Synonyms
  • farge
Derived terms
  • hamlet

Etymology 2

Verb

let

  1. past of la

Further reading

  • “let” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From lètjeti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lêːt/

Noun

lȇt m (Cyrillic spelling ле̑т)

  1. flight

Declension

Related terms

  • lètjeti / lèteti

References

  • “let” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɛ́t/

Noun

lȅt m inan

  1. flight

Inflection


Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English leather.

Noun

let

  1. leather
  2. strap (of leather)
  3. belt

Westrobothnian

Etymology 1

From Old Norse litr, from Proto-Germanic *wlitiz, *wlituz (appearance, look, aspect), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to see).

Noun

let m

  1. colour
  2. complexion
Synonyms
  • leit n

Etymology 2

Verb

let

  1. preterite singular of låt

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to allow.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)