Log in Scrabble Dictionary

What does log mean? Is log a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is log worth? log how many points in Words With Friends? What does log mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for log

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Is log a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word log is a Scrabble US word. The word log is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

L1O1G2

Is log a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word log is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

L1O1G2

Is log a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word log is a Words With Friends word. The word log is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

L2O1G3

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Valid words made from Log

You can make 3 words from 'log' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'log'

LOG 4 

2 letters words from 'log'

GO 3LO 2

All 3 letters words made out of log

log olg lgo glo ogl gol

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word log. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in log.

Definitions and meaning of log

log

For the list of public logs on this wiki, see Special:Log.

Translingual

Symbol

log

  1. (mathematics) logarithm
    if x = b y {\displaystyle x=b^{y}} then log b ( x ) = y {\displaystyle \log _{b}(x)=y}

Hyponyms

  • (logarithm): (with base e) ln, (with base 10) lg, (with base 2) lb or ld

Usage notes

If not specified, the assumed base of the logarithm is either 2, 10, or e, depending on context. Base e is most common in professional mathematics, while base 10 is the default for many calculators and in secondary school pedagogy. Base 2 is frequently used in theoretical computer science but rare outside that field.

Related terms
  • lb, ld, lg, ln

Translations


Alternative forms

  • logg, logge (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /lɒɡ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /lɔɡ/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /lɑɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒɡ, -ɔːɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English logge, logg (since 14th century, while its Anglo-Latin derivatives are attested since early 13th century), of unknown origin.

Ending on -g suggests Scandinavian origin, and it has been proposed: cf. Old Norse lóg, lág (a felled tree; log), which is from liggja (to lie), or its regular reflex Norwegian låg (fallen tree), which could have been borrowed through the Norwegian timber trade. However the Old Norse/Middle Norwegian vowel is long while Middle English vowel is short.

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. The trunk of a dead tree, cleared of branches.
    They walked across the stream on a fallen log.
  2. Any bulky piece as cut from the above, used as timber, fuel etc.
    • 1995: New American Standard Bible: Matthew 7, 3 – 5
      Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, "Let me take the speck out of your eye," and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother's eye.
  3. A unit of length equivalent to 16 feet, used for measuring timber, especially the trunk of a tree.
  4. Anything shaped like a log; a cylinder.
  5. (nautical) A floating device, usually of wood, used in navigation to estimate the speed of a vessel through water.
    • 1659, Navigation by the Mariners Plain Scale New Plain'd, by John Collins
      Every Noon the Master and his Mates take the reckoning off the Log-board, and double the Knots run, and then divide the Product, which is the number of Miles run by three, the quotient is the Leagues run since the former Noon, and according to custom the Log is thrown every two hours, and I never knew the course nearer expressed on the Log-board, then to half a point of the Compass.
  6. (figuratively) A blockhead; a very stupid person.
  7. (surfing slang) A longboard.
    • 1999, Neal Miyake [1]
      I know he hadn’t surfed on a log much in his childhood
  8. (figuratively) A rolled cake with filling.
  9. (mining) A weight or block near the free end of a hoisting rope to prevent it from being drawn through the sheave.
  10. (vulgar) A piece of feces.
Hyponyms
  • (nautical): chip log, taffrail log
  • (rolled cake): Swiss roll, Yule log
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (transitive) To cut trees into logs.
  2. (transitive) To cut down (trees).
  3. (intransitive) To cut down trees in an area, harvesting and transporting the logs as wood.
Synonyms
  • (logbook):
Derived terms
  • logger
Related terms
  • (to cut down trees): logging
Translations

Etymology 2

From logbook, itself from log (above) + book, from a wooden float (chip log, or simply log) used to measure speed.

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. A logbook, or journal of a vessel (or aircraft)'s progress
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      The captain sat down to his log, and here is the beginning of the entry:...
  2. A chronological record of actions, performances, computer/network usage, etc.
  3. (computer science) Specifically, an append-only sequence of records written to file.
Derived terms
  • weblog
Translations

Verb

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (transitive) To make, to add an entry (or more) in a log or logbook.
    to log the miles travelled by a ship
  2. (transitive) To travel (a distance) as shown in a logbook
  3. (transitive) To travel at a specified speed, as ascertained by chip log.
Derived terms
  • log in
Related terms
  • (to add an entry to a log): logbook, weblog/blog, log out/log off, log in/log on
Translations

Etymology 3

Verb

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (obsolete) To move to and fro; to rock.

Etymology 4

From Hebrew לֹג‎.

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. (historical units of measure) A Hebrew unit of liquid volume (about 13 liter).
    • Bible (KJV), Leviticus 14:10:
      ...and one log of oil...
    • 1902, Jewish Encyclopedia, s.v. "Weights and Measures":
      In the Hebrew system the log (Lev. xiv. 10) corresponds to the mina. Since the Hellenistic writers equate the log with the Græco-Roman sextarius, whatever these writers say on the relation of the sextarius to other measures applies also to the relation of these measures to the log. The log and the sextarius, however, are not equal in capacity. The sextarius is estimated at .547 liter, while there is no reason to regard the log as larger than the Babylonian mina, especially as other references of the Greek metrologists support the assumption that the log was equal to the mina. The fact that in the Old Testament the log is mentioned only as a fluid measure may be merely accidental, for the dry measures, which are distinguished in all other cases from the liquid measures, also have the log as their unit. The corresponding dry measure may, however, have been known under a different name.
Meronyms
  • cab, kab (4 logs); hin (12 logs); bath (72 logs); cor, kor, homer, chomer (720 logs)

Etymology 5

From logarithm.

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. logarithm.
Derived terms
  • common log
  • lognormal
  • natural log

References

  • "Weights and Measures" at Oxford Biblical Studies Online

Anagrams

  • Glo.

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *lēga, from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ- (to put down, lie down). Compare Old Frisian lōch, Dutch oorlog (war), Middle High German urlage (fate, battle), Old English log (place), Old Norse løgi (tranquillity), Greek λόχος (lóchos, confinement), Tocharian A lake, Tocharian B leke (lair), Old Irish lige (bad, grave). Alternatively derived from Proto-Slavic *lǫgъ, compare Serbo-Croatian lug, Bulgarian лъг (lǎg).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [lɔɡ]

Noun

log m (indefinite plural logje, definite singular logu, definite plural logjet)

  1. field (in a forest); flat ground, area
  2. battlefield

Declension

Related terms

  • lamth
  • lug

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔx/
  • Rhymes: -ɔx

Etymology 1

Cognates may include English log, lag, Middle High German luggich (slow).

Adjective

log (comparative logger, superlative logst)

  1. lumbering, inert, slow in movement; immobile
  2. (originally) plumb, (too) heavy in built ande/or weight
  3. cumbersome, hard to move or change
  4. dull, uninspired
Inflection
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Cognate with liegen (to (tell a) lie), German lügen.

Noun

log n (plural loggen, diminutive logje n)

  1. A lie, violation of the truth
Derived terms
  • logbaar
  • onlogbaar

Etymology 3

Borrowed from German Loch (hole, opening, cavity).

Noun

log n (plural loggen)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of loch
Derived terms

Etymology 4

From English log (see above), sense (and short for) chip log.

Noun

log m (plural loggen, diminutive logje n)

  1. A chip log, instrument to measure a vessel's speed
Synonyms
  • (derivation): logplankje n
Derived terms

Etymology 5

From logboek.

Noun

log n (plural loggen, diminutive logje n)

  1. logbook
  2. (computing) log

Etymology 6

Noun

log n or m (plural logs, diminutive logje n)

  1. (Internet) weblog
    Synonym: blog

German

Verb

log

  1. First-person singular preterite of lügen.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of lügen.

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish loc (place; hollow, pit, ditch; burial place, grave), possibly from Latin locus.

Pronunciation

  • (Munster, Connacht) IPA(key): /l̪ˠɔɡ/
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /l̪ˠʌɡ/

Noun

log m or f (genitive singular loig or loige, nominative plural loig)

  1. (literary) place
  2. hollow

Declension

Alternative declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • "log" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 loc”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse lǫgr (lake, liquid), from Proto-Germanic *laguz, and ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (pond, pool). Cognates include Latin lacus and Scottish Gaelic loch.

Alternative forms

  • Log (obsolete capitalization)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːɡ/ (example of pronunciation)
  • Homophone: låg

Noun

log m (definite singular logen, indefinite plural logar, definite plural logane)

  1. a fluid used in the boiling of plant material
    1. the resulting broth or stock from such a process
    2. (agriculture) a drink for livestock made from hey boiled or soaked in water
    3. (brewing) hot water poured over the malt during the brewing process
  2. (in place names) a body of water, usually a river or lake
Synonyms
  • (from boiling): avkok, kraft
Derived terms
  • barlog
  • briskelog
  • einelog, einerlog
  • humlelog
  • tjærelog, tjørelog
Related terms
  • låg (Norwegian Bokmål)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse lǫg, neuter plural nominative and accusative of lag. Akin to English law.

Alternative forms

  • Log (obsolete capitalization)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːɡ/ (example of pronunciation)
  • Homophone: låg

Noun

log f (definite singular logi, indefinite plural loger, definite plural logene)

  1. Archaic form of lov (law).

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːɡ/ (example of pronunciation)
  • Homophone: låg

Verb

log

  1. imperative of loga and loge

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /luːɡ/ (example of pronunciation)

Verb

log

  1. (non-standard since 1917) past tense of le

References

Anagrams

  • glo, gol, -log

Old English

Alternative forms

  • lōh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːɡ/, [loːɣ]

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *lōgą (site, situation, camp), from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ- (to be situated, lie). Cognate with Old Frisian lōch (place, locality), Old High German luog (cave, den, cubicle), Old Norse lóg (place). The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek λέκτρον (léktron), Latin lectus (bed), Albanian log (place for men, gathering), Proto-Celtic *leg- (Old Irish lige, Irish luighe), Proto-Slavic *ležati (Russian лежа́ть (ležátʹ)).

Noun

lōg n

  1. a place, stead
Derived terms
  • lōhsceaft
Related terms
Descendants
  • Middle English: loȝ, loogh, lough

Etymology 2

Inflected forms.

Verb

lōg

  1. first-person singular preterite of lēan
  2. third-person singular preterite of lēan

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From lèžati.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lôːɡ/

Noun

lȏg m (Cyrillic spelling ло̑г)

  1. (archaic) bed

Declension

References

  • “log” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *lǫgъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lóːk/

Noun

lọ̑g m inan

  1. grove
  2. small forest

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading

  • log”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Swedish

Verb

log

  1. past tense of le.

Anagrams

  • glo, gol

Volapük

Etymology

Compound of French le and German Auge.

Noun

log (nominative plural logs)

  1. (anatomy) eye

Declension

Derived terms

  • logalip
  • logön

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to fell timber.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)