Long in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does long mean? Is long a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is long worth? long how many points in Words With Friends? What does long mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for long

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Is long a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word long is a Scrabble US word. The word long is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

L1O1N1G2

Is long a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word long is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

L1O1N1G2

Is long a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word long is a Words With Friends word. The word long is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

L2O1N2G3

Our tools

Valid words made from Long

You can make 8 words from 'long' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'long'

LONG 5 

3 letters words from 'long'

GON 4LOG 4
NOG 4 

2 letters words from 'long'

GO 3LO 2
NO 2ON 2

All 4 letters words made out of long

long olng lnog nlog onlg nolg logn olgn lgon glon ogln goln lngo nlgo lgno glno nglo gnlo ongl nogl ognl gonl ngol gnol

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word long. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in long.

Definitions and meaning of long

long

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈlɒŋ/
    • (Conservative RP) IPA(key): /ˈlɔːŋ/
  • (General American) enPR: lông, IPA(key): /ˈlɔŋ/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) enPR: läng, IPA(key): /ˈlɑŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒŋ
  • Hyphenation: long

Etymology 1

From Middle English long, lang, from Old English long, lang (long, tall, lasting), from Proto-West Germanic *lang, from Proto-Germanic *langaz (long), from Proto-Indo-European *dlongʰos (long). Cognate with Scots lang (long), North Frisian long, lung (long), Saterland Frisian loang (long), Norwegian, West Frisian, Dutch and German lang (long), Swedish lång (long), Icelandic langur (long), Galician longo (long), Spanish luengo (long), Latin longus (long), Russian дли́нный (dlínnyj). Not a loan from French long, which is an inherited cognate from the exact same form. Doublet of lungo.

Adjective

long (comparative longer, superlative longest)

  1. Having much distance from one terminating point on an object or an area to another terminating point (usually applies to horizontal dimensions; see Usage Notes below).
  2. Having great duration.
  3. Seemingly lasting a lot of time, because it is boring or tedious or tiring.
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty, Chapter 23
      What I suffered with that rein for four long months in my lady's carriage, it would be hard to describe, but I am quite sure that, had it lasted much longer, either my health or my temper would have given way.
  4. (Britain, dialect) Not short; tall.
    • The colonel and his sponsor made a queer contrast: Greystone [the sponsor] long and stringy, with a face that seemed as if a cold wind was eternally playing on it.
  5. (finance) Possessing or owning stocks, bonds, commodities or other financial instruments with the aim of benefiting of the expected rise in their value.
  6. (cricket) Of a fielding position, close to the boundary (or closer to the boundary than the equivalent short position).
  7. (tennis, of a ball or a shot) Landing beyond the baseline, and therefore deemed to be out.
  8. Occurring or coming after an extended interval; distant in time; far away.
Usage notes
  • Wide is usually used instead of long when referring to a horizontal dimension (left to right).
  • Tall or high are usually used instead of long when referring to positive vertical dimension (upwards), and deep when referring to negative vertical dimension (downwards).
Synonyms
  • (having much distance from one point to another): deep (vertically downwards), extended, high (vertically upwards), lengthy, tall
  • (having great duration): extended, lengthy, prolonged
Antonyms
  • (having much distance from one point to another): low (vertically upwards), shallow (vertically upwards or downwards), short
  • (having great duration): brief, short
  • (finance): short
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

See long/translations § Adjective

Noun

long (plural longs)

  1. (linguistics) A long vowel.
  2. (prosody) A long syllable.
  3. (music) A note formerly used in music, one half the length of a large, twice that of a breve.
  4. (programming) A long integer variable, twice the size of an int, two or four times the size of a short, and half of a long long.
    A long is typically 64 bits in a 32-bit environment.
  5. (finance) An entity with a long position in an asset.
    Every uptick made the longs cheer.
  6. (finance) A long-term investment.
    • 1977, Jerome B. Cohen, Edward D. Zinbarg, Arthur Zeikel, Guide to Intelligent Investing (page 203)
      Likewise, if borrowers prefer to sell short-maturity issues at the time lenders prefer to invest in longs, as is the case when interest rates are expected to fall, longer maturity issues will tend to yield less than shorter maturity issues.
  7. (Britain, colloquial, dated) The long summer vacation at the English universities.

Verb

long (third-person singular simple present longs, present participle longing, simple past and past participle longed)

  1. (transitive, finance) To take a long position in.
See also
  • broad
  • wide

Etymology 2

From Middle English longe, lange, from Old English longe, lange, from the adjective (see above).

Adverb

long (comparative longer, superlative longest)

  1. Over a great distance in space.
  2. For a particular duration.
  3. For a long duration.
Synonyms
  • (over a great distance): a long way, far
  • (for a long duration): a long time
Antonyms
  • (over a great distance): a short distance, a short way
  • (for a long duration): an instant, a minute, a moment, a second, a short time, not long
Translations

See long/translations § Adverb

See also
  • far
  • wide
  • broad

Etymology 3

From Middle English longen, from Old English langian (to long for, yearn after, grieve for, be pained, lengthen, grow longer, summon, belong), from Proto-Germanic *langōną (to desire, long for), from Proto-Indo-European *lengʷʰ- (to be easy, be quick, jump, move around, vary). Cognate with German langen (to reach, be sufficient), Swedish langa (to push, pass by hand), Icelandic langa (to want, desire), Dutch, German verlangen (to desire, want, long for).

Verb

long (third-person singular simple present longs, present participle longing, simple past and past participle longed)

  1. (intransitive) To await, aspire, desire greatly (something to occur or to be true)
Usage notes
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Synonyms
  • (desire greatly): ache, yearn
Derived terms
  • belong
  • forlong
  • longing
Translations

See long/translations § Verb

Etymology 4

From Middle English long, lang, an aphetic form of Middle English ilong, ylong, from Old English ġelong, ġelang (along, belonging, depending, consequent); the verb later reinterpreted as an aphetic form of belong.

Adjective

long (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) On account of, because of.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.8, page 224:
      I am of opinion, that in regarde of theſe debauches and lewde actions, fathers may, in ſome ſort, be blamed, and that it is onely long of them.

Verb

long (third-person singular simple present longs, present participle longing, simple past and past participle longed)

  1. (archaic) To be appropriate to, to pertain or belong to.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.3:
      A goodly Armour, and full rich aray, / Which long'd to Angela, the Saxon Queene, / All fretted round with gold, and goodly wel beseene.
    • circa 1591, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, IV, 4:
      Tis well, and hold your owne in any case / With such austeritie as longeth to a father.

Etymology 5

Shortening of longitude

Noun

long (plural longs)

  1. longitude
Coordinate terms
  • lat

Etymology 6

From Middle English longen, from Old English langian (to belong, pertain), from Old English *lang, which is of uncertain origin yet related to Old English ġelang (dependent, attainable, present, belonging, consequent), Old Saxon gilang (ready, available).

Verb

long (third-person singular simple present longs, present participle longing, simple past and past participle longed)

  1. (obsolete) To belong.

References

  • long at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • long in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch long, from Middle Dutch longe, also longen, longene, from Old Dutch *lungan, *lunganna, from Proto-Germanic *lunganjō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔŋ/

Noun

long (plural longe, diminutive longetjie)

  1. lung

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch longe, also longen, longene, from Old Dutch *lungan, *lunganna, from Proto-Germanic *lunganjō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔŋ/
  • Hyphenation: long
  • Rhymes: -ɔŋ

Noun

long f or m (plural longen, diminutive longetje n)

  1. lung

Usage notes

Traditionally feminine in the Netherlands, masculine in Belgium due to masculinisation.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: long

Franco-Provençal

Adjective

long m (feminine singular longe, masculine plural longs, feminine plural longes)

  1. long

Derived terms

  • longior

French

Etymology

From Old French long, from longe, longue, feminine of lonc, lunc, from Latin longus, from Proto-Indo-European *dlongʰos (long). Cognate with English long, origin of German Chaiselongue.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔ̃/
  • Rhymes: -ɔ̃
  • Homophone: longs

Adjective

long (feminine singular longue, masculine plural longs, feminine plural longues)

  1. long
    Synonyms: épais, grand, haut, large, profond
    Antonyms: bas, court, étroit, mince
    le nez de pinocchio mesure le matin 5 cm de long - the nose of pinocchio measures the morning 5 cm long

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “long” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Haitian Creole

Etymology

French long (long).

Adjective

long

  1. long

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish long, from Latin (navis) longa (long (ship)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /l̪ˠɔŋ/, /l̪ˠuːŋɡ/

Noun

long f (genitive singular loinge, nominative plural longa)

  1. ship

Declension

Derived terms

  • bratlong (flagship)

Mandarin

Romanization

long

  1. Nonstandard spelling of lōng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of lóng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of lǒng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of lòng.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norman

Alternative forms

  • laong (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French long, a back-formation from longe, longue, the feminine form of Early Old French lonc, from Latin longus.

Adjective

long m

  1. (Jersey) long

Occitan

Etymology

From Latin longus.

Adjective

long m (feminine singular longa, masculine plural longs, feminine plural longas)

  1. long

Related terms

  • alongar

Old English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lonɡ/, [loŋɡ]

Adjective

long

  1. Alternative form of lang

Declension


Old French

Alternative forms

  • lonc (early Old French)
  • lunc (Anglo-Norman)

Etymology

Backformation from longe, longue, the feminine form of lonc.

Adjective

long m (oblique and nominative feminine singular longe)

  1. long (length, duration)

Declension

Descendants

  • French: long
  • Norman: long (Jersey), laong (Guernsey)

Old Frisian

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *lang, from Proto-Germanic *langaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dlongʰos. Cognates include Old English lang, Old Saxon lang and Old Dutch *lang.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈloŋɡ/

Adjective

long

  1. long

Descendants

  • North Frisian: long, lung
  • Saterland Frisian: loang
  • West Frisian: lang

References

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old Irish

Etymology

Generally assumed to be a Latin loan, from (navis) longa, but Joseph Loth believed it to be from Proto-Celtic; either way, cognate to Welsh llong.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /l͈oŋɡ/

Noun

long f (genitive lungae, nominative plural longa)

  1. boat
  2. ship

Inflection

Synonyms

  • bárc
  • cnairr
  • laídeng
  • scib

Descendants

  • Irish: long
  • Manx: lhong
  • Scottish Gaelic: long

Mutation


Pijin

Preposition

long

  1. to; toward; into
  2. in; at; near

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish long.

Noun

long f (genitive singular luinge, plural longan)

  1. ship

Derived terms


Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English along.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loŋ/, [lɔŋ], [lɔ(ː)]

Preposition

long

  1. Used to mark spatial direct objects that something is oriented in the manner of, where English would use to, toward, into, or onto
      • These lights must rise in the sky to cast light toward the ground.
  2. Used to mark spatial direct objects that something is oriented in the location of, where English would use in, at, on, or near
      • These lights must rise in the sky to cast light toward the ground.
  3. Used to mark indirect objects, or direct objects of intransitive verbs, where English would use to
      • And God made a good speech to give strength to them. He said to them: "You varied things of the ocean, you must multiply and fill every part of the sea. And you birds, you must multiply on earth.
  4. Used to mark spatial direct objects that something is oriented in the manner opposite of, extracted from, or away from, where English would use from or out of
      • Then God made a woman out of that bone he had taken from the man, and later he brought the woman to go to the man.
  5. Used to mark temporal direct objects in which a condition lasts for a certain duration of time, where English would use for
      • And the Lord God said to the snake: "You did a bad deed, and so I have a powerful curse for you. You will have a great weight. The wight you carry will exceed that of any all animals. Now, and for all times, you will only walk on your stomach. And you will eat the dirt of the earth.
  6. Used to mark a verb whose subject is the direct object of another verb, where English would use to or from
      • And God said to Adam: "You listened to what your woman said, and you ate a fruit of this tree which I have forbidden you from eating. And so I will now corrupt the earth, and food will not grow well enough. You will work very hard forever to make food grow in the ground.

Derived terms

  • long wanem

Vietnamese

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [lawŋ͡m˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [lawŋ͡m˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [lawŋ͡m˧˧]

Etymology 1

Compare lung as in lung lay.

Adjective

long

  1. loose

Etymology 2

Sino-Vietnamese word from (dragon).

Noun

long

  1. (only in compounds) dragon

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔŋ/

Noun

long

  1. Soft mutation of llong.

Mutation


Source: wiktionary.org
  • extending for a considerable distance.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)