Much in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does much mean? Is much a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is much worth? much how many points in Words With Friends? What does much mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for much

See how to calculate how many points for much.

Is much a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word much is a Scrabble US word. The word much is worth 11 points in Scrabble:

M3U1C3H4

Is much a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word much is a Scrabble UK word and has 11 points:

M3U1C3H4

Is much a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word much is a Words With Friends word. The word much is worth 13 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

M4U2C4H3

Our tools

Valid words made from Much

You can make 9 words from 'much' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'much'

CHUM 11MUCH 11

3 letters words from 'much'

CUM 7HUM 8

2 letters words from 'much'

CH 7HM 7
MU 4UH 5
UM 4 

All 4 letters words made out of much

much umch mcuh cmuh ucmh cumh muhc umhc mhuc hmuc uhmc humc mchu cmhu mhcu hmcu chmu hcmu uchm cuhm uhcm hucm chum hcum

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word much. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in much.

Definitions and meaning of much

much

Etymology

From Middle English muche (much, great), apocopated variant of muchel (much, great), from Old English myċel, miċel, micel (large, great, much), from Proto-Germanic *mikilaz (great, many, much), from Proto-Indo-European *meǵh₂- (big, stour, great). See also mickle, muckle.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mʌt͡ʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌtʃ

Determiner

much (comparative more, superlative most)

  1. A large amount of. [from 13thc.]
    Hurry! We don't have much time!
    They set about the task with much enthusiasm.
    • 1816, Jane Austen, Persuasion:
      As it was, he did nothing with much zeal, but sport; and his time was otherwise trifled away, without benefit from books or anything else.
    • 2011, "Wisconsin and wider", The Economist, 24 February:
      Unless matters take a nastier turn, neither side has much incentive to compromise.
  2. (in combinations such as 'as much', 'this much') Used to indicate, demonstrate or compare the quantity of something.
    Add this much water and no more.
    Take as much time as you like.
  3. (now archaic or nonstandard) A great number of; many (people). [from 13thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter x, in Le Morte Darthur, book XX:
      ye shall not nede to seke hym soo ferre sayd the Kynge / for as I here saye sir Launcelot will abyde me and yow in the Ioyous gard / and moche peple draweth vnto hym as I here saye
    • 1526, Bible, tr. William Tyndale, Matthew VI:
      When Jesus was come downe from the mountayne, moch people folowed him.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula:
      There wasn't much people about that day.
  4. (now Caribbean, African-American) Many ( + plural countable noun). [from 13thc.]
    • 1977, Bob Marley, So Much Things to Say:
      They got so much things to say right now, they got so much things to say.

Usage notes

  • Much is now generally used with uncountable nouns. The equivalent used with countable nouns is many. In positive contexts, much is widely avoided: I have a lot of money instead of I have much money. There are some exceptions to this, however: I have much hope for the future.
  • Unlike many determiners, much is frequently modified by intensifying adverbs, as in “too much”, “very much”, “so much”, “not much”, and so on. (The same is true of many.)

Synonyms

  • a great deal of, (informal) a lot of

Antonyms

  • little

Related terms

  • how much
  • too much

Translations

Adjective

much (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Large, great. [12th-16thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter iiij, in Le Morte Darthur, book XX:
      Thenne launcelot vnbarred the dore / and with his lyfte hand he held it open a lytel / so that but one man myghte come in attones / and soo there came strydyng a good knyghte a moche man and large / and his name was Colgreuaunce / of Gore / and he with a swerd strake at syr launcelot myȝtely and he put asyde the stroke
  2. (obsolete) Long in duration.

Adverb

much (comparative more, superlative most)

  1. To a great extent.
  2. Often; frequently.
  3. (in combinations such as 'as much', 'this much') Used to indicate or compare extent.
    I don't like Wagner as much as I like Mozart.
  4. (obsolete) Almost.

Usage notes

  • As a verb modifier in positive contexts, much must be modified by another adverb: I like fish very much, I like fish so much, etc. but not *I like fish much.
  • As a comparative intensifier, many can be used instead of much if it modifies the comparative form of many, i.e. more with a countable noun: many more people but much more snow.
  • May be used in humorous questions to draw attention to somebody's undesirable behaviour: "desperate much?", "cherry-picking much?", etc.

Synonyms

  • (to a great extent): (informal) a great deal, (informal) a lot, greatly, highly, (informal) loads, plenty (slang, especially US), very much

Antonyms

  • (to a great extent): less, little, few

Derived terms

Translations

Pronoun

much

  1. A large amount or great extent.
    From those to whom much has been given much is expected.
    We lay awake for much of the night.

Anagrams

  • Chum, chum

Chuukese

Verb

much

  1. to end

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mux/

Noun

much

  1. genitive plural of moucha

Old Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [mut͡ʃ]

Adverb

much

  1. Apocopic form of mucho; very, greatly
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 36r.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mux/

Noun

much

  1. genitive plural of mucha

Yucatec Maya

Noun

much

  1. Obsolete spelling of muuch

Source: wiktionary.org
  • plentiful.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)