Ne in Scrabble Dictionary

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Is ne a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word ne is a Scrabble US word. The word ne is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

N1E1

Is ne a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word ne is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

N1E1

Is ne a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word ne is a Words With Friends word. The word ne is worth 3 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

N2E1

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2 letters words from 'ne'

EN 2NE 2

Definitions and meaning of ne

ne

Etymology

From Middle English ne, from Old English ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nə/

Adverb

ne (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Not.
    • 1481, William Caxton, Lyf of the Noble and Crysten Prynce, Charles the Grete:
      I ne entende but onely to reduce thauncyent ryme in to prose.
      I ne intend, but only to reduce thauncient rhyme into prose.
    • c1500, Melusine (translation):
      For she ne dare doo, but to commande.
    • 1512, Robert Copland, The History of Helyas, Knight of The Swan:
      And whan the good quene herde these pyteous tydynges lytel lacked that the ne dyed for sorowe / wherfore all lamentably the began to complayne her sayenge.
    • 1513, Gavin Douglas, The Aeneid (translation):
      To suffir exile he said that he ne couth.
    • 1513, Gavin Douglas, The Aeneid (translation):
      I ne ask na land, nor realm.
    • c1520, Andria by Terence (translation):
      This shold haue bene his skuce at the lest / And it ne had bene but good & honest.
    • c1520, Andria by Terence (translation):
      O so incessaunt thow ad in thy desyre / For so that thow thy mynde now mayst haue / Thow ne caryst what thow dost requyre.
    • 1550, The Mirror for Magistrates:
      For he ne had, nor could increase his line.
    • 1562, Arthur Brooke, The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet:
      In geving me to him whom I ne can, ne may, ne ought to love.
    • 1576, William Lambarde, A perambulation of Kent:
      Mary (quoth the king) so might me mine, ne haddest thou been Earle Godwine: casting in his dish the murder of his brother Alfred, which was done to death at Elie by the Counsell of Godwine.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender:
      Ne durst again his fieri face out-show.
    • 1587, Gascoigne and Kinwelmershe, Jocasta:
      Ioc: How can that be and thou my ioy in warre? Po: Henceforth n'am I your ioy ne yet your sonne.
    • c1590, William Fowler, The Works of William Fowler:
      What happs might chance me I ne knewe.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene:
      His forces faile, ne can no lenger fight.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene:
      As when a ship, that flyes faire vnder saile, / An hidden rocke escaped hath vnwares, / That lay in waite her wrack for to bewaile, / The Marriner yet halfe amazed stares / At perill past, and yet it doubt ne dares / To ioy at his foole-happie ouersight.
    • 1591, John Phillip, A Commemoration on the Life and Death of the Right Honourable, Sir Christopher Hatton:
      And now sweete death most welcome vnto mee, thy stroakes ne can, ne shall me once dismay.
    • 1592, Robert Greene, A Looking Glass for London:
      And twenty thousand infants that ne wot the right hand from the left.
    • 1607, Thomas Walkington, The Optick Glasse of Humors:
      But when he spoke, his plenteous words did flow / Like to thick-falling flakes of winter snow, / Ne any couth his wit so hiely straine.
    • 1614, John Davies of Hereford, Eclogue Between Young Willy the SInger of His Native Pastorals, and Old Wernocke His Friend:
      Now, siker ( Wernocke ) thou hast split the marke / Albe that I ne wot I han mis-song: / But, for I am so yong, I dread my warke / Woll be misualued both of old and yong.
    • 1812, Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto I, 2:
      Whilom in Albion's isle there dwelt a youth, / Who ne in virtue's ways did take delight [...].

Conjunction

ne

  1. (obsolete) Nor.
    • 1484, Original Letters, King Edward the Fifth, under the direction of his Uncle, to Otes Gilbert, Esq., commanding him to receive Knighthood at the expected Coronation:
      That than I shall not geve therunto faith ne credence, nor therfore put them to any maner ponyssement, before that they or any of them so accused may be at their lawful defence and answer.
    • 1489, The gouernayle of helthe:
      And therin is no drede nor bytternes ne expences, but therin is pure recreacyon of body and of soule soo it be donn in clene places.
    • 1489, The gouernayle of helthe:
      Be not to hasty ne sodenly vengeable, to poure folke doo no vyolence.
    • 1489, The gouernayle of helthe:
      Moreouer no man be so hardy to drynk fastyng cold water, ne after that he hath accompanyed wyth a woman, ne after gret trauayle, ne after exersice tyll he haue fyrst rested hym, ne by nyght namely yf he haue do gloue tofore.
    • 1500, The Example of Euyll Tongues:
      A false tonge wyll euer Imagyne and saye / That neuer by creature was sayd ne thought.
    • 1509, Wynkyn de Worde, The fyftene joyes of maryage:
      For chastyce can he not by daye ne nyght his wyfe but by his betynge maketh lyght and hote the loue bytwene her and her frende.
    • 1511, The Records of the City of Norwich:
      Item, that noo woman nor maide weyve any worsted stamynges ne sayes for that that thei be nott of sufficient powre to werke the said worsteddes as thei owte to be wrought, upon payne of iij s iiij d as often as thei be founde wevyng to be devyded and leuyed in maner and forme aboue expressed.
    • 1520, Richard Pynson, The Lyfe of The Blessed Martyr Saynte Thomas:
      That they shulde no lenger kepe ne susteyne Thomas the archebysshope.
    • 1526, The Grete Herball:
      The rote ought to be gadered in the begynnynge of somer and dryed in the sonne bycause [tha]¬t it corrupt ne rotte bycause of the moystnesse[,] & it may be kept two yeres;
    • 1535, Thomas Elyot, The Education or Bringing up of Children:
      For lyinge is a detestable vice, and to be hated of all men, ne to be suffred amonge seruantis ne other persones[,] howe poure estate so euer they be of.
    • 1542, Nicholas Udall, Apophthegms (translation):
      Thus some persones beeyng inuited and exhorted to falle to the studie of lettres, make their excuse that thei bee sickely, that thei can not slepe ne take their naturall reste in the nightes.
    • 1558, Thomas Phaer, The Aeneid (translation):
      We Moores be not so base of wit, ne yet so blunt of mynd.
    • c1560, Edward Gosynhill, The Schoolhouse of Women:
      The deuyll gossyp, ought me a shame / And prayde I am nowe, euerye penye I wolde god he had, be blinde and lame / The daye and houre, he fyrste woed me / Ware not gossyp, these chyldren thre I wolde not tary, ye may be sure / Longer with hym, daye ne houre.
    • 1562, Arthur Brooke, The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet:
      Neither extremitie, ne gentle meanes could boote; she hydeth close within her brest, her secret sorowes roote.
    • 1562, Arthur Brooke, The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet:
      Ne on her teares or plaint, at all to have remorse, but (if they can not with her will,) to bring the mayde perforce.
    • 1570, John Thynne, The Debate betweene Pride and Lowlines:
      His hart encreaseth not thereby ne lesseth as edoon these fooles.
    • 1577, The Hereford Municipal Manuscript:
      And that no victualer ne other person or persons forestall any kynde of victualls cominge to the said Cyty or within the precyncte of the same before the same victualls be come to the place.
    • 1587, Gascoigne and Kinwelmershe, Jocasta:
      Ioc: How can that be and thou my ioy in warre? Po: Henceforth n'am I your ioy ne yet your sonne.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.1:
      But to her cry they list not lenden eare, / Ne ought the more their mightie strokes surceasse.
    • 1634, W. Lathum:
      Whose worth all outward is in shew alone / But inward sent hath not, ne vertue none.
    • 1798, Samuel Coleridge, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner", ll. 443-6:
      The pang, the curse, with which they died, / Had never pass'd away; / I could not draw my een from theirs / Ne turn them up to pray.

Usage notes

  • Ne survives only as part of the oral tradition in rural Scotland and Northern England. It is almost never used in common speech.

Anagrams

  • -en, EN, en, en-

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • (Gheg) na

Etymology

The nominative-accusative is from accusative Proto-Albanian *nōs, stressed form of clitic Proto-Indo-European *nos, which is continued by the clitic na. Neve and nesh are innovated, but Gheg retains dative nahe (Old Albanian nae) from a genitive *nosōm.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [nɛ]

Pronoun

ne (accusative ne, dative neve, ablative nesh)

  1. we, us

Declension

See also

References


Blagar

Noun

ne

  1. human, person

References

  • A. Schapper, The Papuan Languages of Timor, Alor and Pantar: Volume 1

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *ni.

Particle

ne

  1. not

Usage notes

Used combined with ket, mirroring French ne ... pas.


Catalan

Pronoun

ne (enclitic, contracted 'n, proclitic en, contracted proclitic n')

  1. represents an indeterminate number or quantity of a given noun
  2. represents a place (associated with the action described by the verb) that would be introduced by the preposition de
  3. replaces a phrase introduced by the preposition de
  4. replaces the object of a causative verb

Usage notes

  • Ne cannot be used more than once as the object of a given verb.
  • While ne is usually used to replace phrases beginning with the prepostion de, adverbial phrases (eg de pressa) are replaced with hi.
  • Ne is sometimes used instead of ho to replace an adjective or indefinite noun as the predicate of a verb.
  • Ne is sometimes used popularly to add emphasis to a sentence: in this sense, it has no translation in English.

See also


Chuukese

Conjunction

ne

  1. to (connects verbs)

Preposition

ne

  1. Expressing a fraction or a ratio. Preceded by a nominator and followed by the denominator.

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈnɛ]

Interjection

ne

  1. no!

Particle

ne

  1. not

See also

  • ano

Further reading

  • ne in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ne in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Latin nec, neque. Compare Italian , Spanish and French ni, Romanian nici.

Adverb

ne

  1. neither

Deg

Noun

ne

  1. water

References

  • Maurice Delafosse, Vocabulaires comparatifs de plus de 60 langues ou dialectes parlés à la Côte d’Ivoire et dans les régions limitrophes : avec des notes linguistiques et ethnologiques, une bibliographie et une carte (Paris, E. Leroux, 1904), page 231

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • nen

Etymology

From nen through apocope, itself a contraction of eenen, enen, the now-obsolete accusative form of een.

Pronunciation

Article

ne

  1. (Brabantian) a, an

Usage notes

ne is used primarily in the dialects that retain the three-gender split. It is only used for masculine words, while een is used for feminine and neuter words.

The form nen is used before vowels (as the English an) and certain consonants (commonly b, d and t), differing from dialect to dialect.

See also

  • den

Anagrams

  • en

Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl

Determiner

ne

  1. that.

Pronoun

ne

  1. that.

Esperanto

Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ne/
    • Hyphenation: ne

Particle

ne

  1. no
  2. not
  3. non-

Antonyms

  • jes

Finnish

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *nek, from Proto-Uralic *ne + *-k (dual ending).

For the inflectional stems ni-, see se. nii- possibly derives from ni- with the plural infix (-i-).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈne/, [ˈne̞]
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Syllabification: ne

Pronoun

ne (plural, stem nii-)

  1. (demonstrative, of things and animals) they, those (plural of the pronoun se (it); objects not pointed at by the speaker)
  2. (colloquial, dialectal, of people) they
    Synonym: he

Inflection

The case suffixes are mostly regular (except inessive and elative singular). Abessive is never used in singular and extremely seldom in plural. Instructive niin is more or less a theoretical construction, since it has developed into an adverb, and its current meaning cannot be derived from ne.

See also

  • tämä
  • tuo
  • se
  • nämä
  • nuo

Determiner

ne

  1. those, the (not pointed at by the speaker)

Anagrams

  • -en, en

French

Etymology

From Latin nōn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nə/
  • Rhymes:

Particle

ne

  1. (literary) not (used alone to negate a verb; now chiefly with the verbs pouvoir, savoir, cesser and oser)
    • 1713, Voltaire, letter, Dec 1713:
    • 1826, Victor Hugo, Bug-Jargal, XXXVIII:
    • 1868, Emile Zola, Madeleine Férat:
    • 1943, Jean-Paul Sartre, Réflexions sur la question juive:
  2. not, no (used before a verb, with a subsequent element following; see Usage Notes, below)
    • 1851, Henri Murger, Le pays latin:
    • 1998, Michel Houellebecq, Les Particules Élémentaires:
    • 2012, Le Monde, 3 May 2012:
  3. Used in a subordinate clause before a subjunctive verb (especially when the main verb expresses doubt or fear), to provide extra overtones of doubt or uncertainty (but not negating its verb); the so-called "pleonastic" or "expletive" ne.
    • 1829, Victor Hugo, Le Derner Jour d'un Condamné, XXVII:
    • 1837, George Sand, Mauprat:
  4. In comparative clauses usually translated with the positive sense of the subsequent negative

Usage notes

  • Ne is typically followed by a verb and then a negative adverbial pas, plus, jamais, guère, or (now literary) point; by a negative pronoun personne or rien; or by a negative determiner, aucun or nul.
  • In colloquial French, ne is often omitted:
  • In literary French, ne can be used alone with certain verbs, as specified above.

See also

  • guère
  • jamais
  • pas
  • personne
  • plus
  • point
  • que
  • rien

Further reading

  • “ne” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  • French grammar: Negation on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • en

German

Etymology 1

Contraction of nicht, dialectal net, nit, ni.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nə/

Interjection

ne

  1. (colloquial) right?; is it?; is it not?; tag question
    Wir müssen da lang, ne?
    We need to go that way, don't we?
    Du hast keine Geschwister, ne?
    You don't have siblings, do you?
Synonyms
  • gell
  • nicht
  • nicht wahr
  • oder
  • wa

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /neː/

Interjection

ne

  1. Alternative spelling of nee

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nə/

Article

ne

  1. (nonstandard) Alternative spelling of 'ne

German Low German

Article

ne f

  1. (Paderbornisch) nominative/accusative feminine singular of en: a

Pronoun

ne m

  1. (Paderbornisch) weak accusative of hei: him

See also

  • iähne

Gothic

Romanization

  1. Romanization of 𐌽𐌴

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈnɛ]

Adverb

ne

  1. don't, should/shall not, stop (doing something)

Usage notes

Used before the verb in an imperative clause (or sometimes a conditional clause expressing a wish or desire) to negate that clause; ne is always used instead of nem in the imperative mood.

Derived terms

(Compound words)

  • nebáncsvirág
  • nehogy

Further reading

  • ne in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Ido

Etymology

From Esperanto ne, from French ne, Russian не (ne).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ne/, /nɛ/

Adverb

ne

  1. not, don’t

Noun

ne (plural ne-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter N/n.

See also

  • (Latin script letter names) litero; a, be, ce, che, de, e, fe, ge, he, i, je, ke, le, me, ne, o, pe, que, re, se, she, te, u, ve, we, xe, ye, ze (Category: io:Latin letter names)

Derived terms

  • ne- (non-, un-, in-, im-, ir- (etc.))

Isthmus Zapotec

Conjunction

ne

  1. and

Istro-Romanian

Etymology

From Latin nix, nivem, through Proto-Romanian (compare Romanian nea, Aromanian neao), from Proto-Italic *sniks, from Proto-Indo-European *snígʷʰs (snow), root noun derived from *sneygʷʰ- (to snow).

Noun

ne f (definite nevu, genitive/dative lu nevu)

  1. snow

Italian

Etymology

From Latin inde (thence). Compare French en (adverb, pronoun).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ne/
  • Rhymes: -e

Adverb

ne

  1. from there

Usage notes

  • The adverb ne replaces di là (from there):

Pronoun

ne

  1. about it
  2. of it
  3. of them (sometimes not translated in English)

Usage notes

  • The pronoun ne stands for di + [pronoun], and can thus be a translation of “[preposition] + it/them” for any preposition that is translated as di in Italian.

See also

Contraction

ne

  1. Apocopic form of nel

Usage notes

  • The contraction ne is used where nel, nella, etc, would ordinarily be used, but cannot be because the article is part of the title of a film, book, etc.

See also

  • de

See also


Japanese

Romanization

ne

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Kalasha

Determiner

ne

  1. no

Particle

ne

  1. no

Kurdish

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Interjection

ne

  1. no (used to show disagreement or negation)

Ladin

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /neː/, [n̪eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ne/, [nɛ]

Etymology 1

Extended from Proto-Indo-European *ne (not) (whence Old Latin ne (not)).

Adverb

(not comparable)

  1. no, not
Derived terms
  • nē quidem (not even)

Conjunction

(+ subjunctive)

  1. that not, in order not to and similar; lest
Usage notes
  • Not to be confused with the affirmative particle ne (see Etymology 2).
Derived terms
  • nēve/neu
  • nē quō (to no place, nowhither)
  • nē quis
  • neutiquam
Related terms

Etymology 2

From the same source as enim, Ancient Greek νή (nḗ), ναί (naí).

Interjection

  1. truly!, indeed!; commonly connected with other affirmative particles

Latvian

Pronunciation

Conjunction

ne

  1. not

Lithuanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɛ/

Interjection

ne

  1. no (used to show disagreement or negation)



Livonian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ne/

Pronoun

ne

  1. they; nominative plural of tämā

Luganda

Conjunction

ne

  1. and (only used if the overall statement is grammatically positive)

See also

  • na

References

The Essentials of Luganda, J. D. Chesswas, 4th edition. Oxford University Press: Nairobi. 1967, p. 94.


Mandarin

Pronunciation

Romanization

ne (Zhuyin ˙ㄋㄜ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of ,
  2. Pinyin transcription of

ne

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mezquital Otomi

Etymology 1

From Proto-Otomi [Term?], from Proto-Otomian [Term?], from Proto-Oto-Pamean *neʔ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nè/

Verb

ne

  1. (trans) want

Etymology 2

From Proto-Otomi *ne, from Proto-Otomian *ne, from Proto-Oto-Pamean *te/*ne, from Proto-Oto-Manguean *(Y)te(H)³.

Alternative forms

  • (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /né/, /ně/

Noun

ne

  1. mouth
  2. snout
  3. edge (of a blade)
  4. bite, sting
  5. animals at the head of the herd

References

  • Andrews, Enriqueta (1950) Vocabulario otomí de Tasquillo, Hidalgo[1] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 19, 47, 74
  • Hernández Cruz, Luis; Victoria Torquemada, Moisés (2010) Diccionario del hñähñu (otomí) del Valle del Mezquital, estado de Hidalgo (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 45)‎[2] (in Spanish), second edition, Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 210

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Usage notes

Immediately precedes the verb. Often found in combination with the synonymous niet or another negating adverb, which is placed elsewhere.

Alternative forms

  • en

Descendants

  • Dutch: n- (prefix)

Further reading

  • “ne (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “ne (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “en (V)”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page en
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “ne”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Middle English

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Conjunction

ne

  1. nor

Middle French

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • n'

Adverb

ne

  1. not (used to negate a verb)
Usage notes
  • As in modern French, may be used in combination with another adverb, such as ne... iamais, ne... pas, ne... gaire, ne... mie, ne... oncques, ne... poin(c)t and ne... rien(s), but such an adverb is not required.

Etymology 2

See ny

Conjunction

ne

  1. Alternative form of ny (neither; nor)

Negerhollands

Verb

ne

  1. take

References

  • Language Contact in the Danish West Indies (2012, →ISBN

Northern Ndebele

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-ne, from Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ne (not)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ne/

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Descendants

  • Middle English: ne
    • Scots: ne
    • English: ne

Old French

Etymology

From Latin nec.

Adverb

ne

  1. not; used to form negative constructions

Descendants

  • French: ne

Conjunction

ne

  1. neither (not one or the other)

Descendants

  • French: ni

Old Saxon

Alternative forms

  • ni

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ne.

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Descendants

  • Middle Low German: ne, en

Phuthi

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-ne, from Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.


Romanian

Alternative forms

  • нє (pre-1860s Cyrillic form)

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin nīs, from Latin nos. Compare (old form) and Aromanian .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ne/

Pronoun

ne (unstressed accusative and reflexive form of noi)

  1. (direct object, first-person plural) us
    El ne urmează.
    He's following us.

Related terms

  • noi (stressed accusative)

Pronoun

ne (unstressed dative and reflexive form of noi)

  1. (indirect object) (to) us
    Ele ne dau cadouri.
    They give us presents.

Related terms

  • nouă (stressed dative)

See also

  • ne-
  • te
  • se

Scots

Etymology

From Old English ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /neɪ/, /nɛ/, /nə/, /n(ː)/

Adverb

ne

  1. (archaic, rare) Not.
    (A Northern English folk saying)

Conjunction

ne

  1. (archaic, rare) Nor.

Usage notes

  • Ne is a negative particle and it is used preverbally, i.e. it is placed directly before a verb, for example,ː"What haps might chance me I ne knew" (William Fowler (makar), 1590) and "To suffer exile he said that he ne couth" (Gavin Douglas, Virgil's Aeneid, 1513). Now archaic and chiefly dialectal, it is still understood and used by a few rural speakers in Scotland and Northern England.
  • As a conjunction, it is placed immediately before the word it negates as inː ne mickle, ne little; Twas ne man, ne woman.. ne beast; ne rich, ne poor, ne bold, ne meek, ne stong, ne weak can escape God's wrath.
  • In urban areas and cities became displaced by na or nae.

Further reading

  • “ne” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ne/

Particle

ne (Cyrillic spelling не)

  1. not (denoting negation)
    ne znam — I don't know
    on je ne samo darovit, već i jako marljiv — he is not only talented, but also very industrious
    htio-ne htio — whether you want it or not
    da ne spavaš? / ne spavaš li? / zar ne spavaš? — aren't you sleeping?
    ne mogu, a da ne.. — I cannot but...
    reći ne — to say no; refuse, decline
    ne manje nego/od.. — no less than...
    ne doći — to fail to come, not come
    .... Zar ne? — ... Aren't you? (Isn't it?, Do you?, Don't you?)
    "neću" — I won't

Interjection

ne (Cyrillic spelling не)

  1. no
    Jesi li demokrat? Ne! — Are you a democrat? No!

Synonyms

  • jok (dialectal)

Antonyms

  • da

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɛ́/, /nɛ/

Particle

  1. not (negates meaning of verb)
  2. no (expresses disapproval, disagreement)

Antonyms

  • (no): ,

Southern Ndebele

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-ne, from Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.


Swazi

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-ne, from Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.


Turkish

Etymology 1

From Ottoman Turkish نه(ne, what, whatever, how), from Old Anatolian Turkish [script needed] (ne, what), from Proto-Turkic *nē- (what). The only Turkic root beginning with /n/. The earliest PT form must have contained a unique initial nasal, having yielded specific reflexes in modern languages.

Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰤𐰀(n²a /ne/, what, which), Karakhanid [script needed] (, what), Old Uyghur [script needed] (ne, what), Azerbaijani (what), Bashkir ни (ni, what), Chuvash мӗн (mĕn, what), Kazakh не (ne, what), Khakas ниме (nime, what), Kyrgyz не (ne, what), Tatar ни (ni, what), Turkmen nǟmä (what), Tuvan чүү (čüü, what), Uyghur نېمە(nëme, what), Uzbek na (what), Yakut туох (tuox, what).

Pronoun

ne

  1. what
  2. whatever
Declension
Related terms

Adverb

ne

  1. what, how, such
  2. Used as an intensifier to express surprise, astonishment, together with expressions like be!, ha!.

Etymology 2

From Ottoman Turkish نه(ne, neither; nor), from Persian نه(na). Cognate to Old English ne (not).

Conjunction

ne

  1. neither; nor
Usage notes
  • Not used alone but rather as ne...ne..., the way it is used is directly copied from Persian نه...نه...(“neither; nor”).
Antonyms
  • ...de...de, ...da...da

Etymology 3

Noun

ne

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N.

See also

  • (Latin-script letter names) harf; a, be, ce, çe, de, e, fe, ge, yumuşak ge, he, ı, i, je, ke, le, me, ne, o, ö, pe, re, se, şe, te, u, ü, ve, ye, ze

References


Tuvaluan

Particle

ne

  1. past tense marker, inserted immediately before the relevant verb

Unami

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [nə]

Pronoun

  1. that (inanimate)

Ura (Vanuatu)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ne/, [ne]

Noun

ne

  1. water
  2. river

Further reading

  • Terry Crowley, Ura: A Disappearing Language of Southern Vanuatu (1999)

Xhosa

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-ne, from Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection


Yup'ik

Noun

ne (absolutive ena)

  1. house

Zou

Noun

ne

  1. lip

Verb

ne

  1. eat

References

  • http://www.languageinindia.com/feb2013/zouphonologyfinal.pdf

Zulu

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-ne, from Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

Derived terms

  • isine

References

  • C. M. Doke; B. W. Vilakazi (1972), “-ne”, in Zulu-English Dictionary, →ISBN: “-ne

Source: wiktionary.org
  • not.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)