Near in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does near mean? Is near a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is near worth? near how many points in Words With Friends? What does near mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for near

See how to calculate how many points for near.

Is near a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word near is a Scrabble US word. The word near is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

N1E1A1R1

Is near a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word near is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

N1E1A1R1

Is near a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word near is a Words With Friends word. The word near is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

N2E1A1R1

Our tools

Valid words made from Near

You can make 23 words from 'near' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'near'

EARN 4NARE 4
NEAR 4REAN 4

3 letters words from 'near'

ANE 3ARE 3
EAN 3EAR 3
ERA 3ERN 3
NAE 3RAN 3
REN 3 

2 letters words from 'near'

AE 2AN 2
AR 2EA 2
EN 2ER 2
NA 2NE 2
RE 2 

All 4 letters words made out of near

near enar naer aner eanr aenr nera enra nrea rnea erna rena nare anre nrae rnae arne rane earn aern eran rean aren raen

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word near. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in near.

Definitions and meaning of near

near

Etymology

From Middle English nere, ner, from Old English nēar (nearer, comparative of nēah (nigh)), influenced by Old Norse nær (near), both originating from Proto-Germanic *nēhwiz (nearer), comparative of the adverb *nēhw (near). Cognate with Old Frisian niār (nearer), Dutch naar (to, towards), German näher (nearer), Danish nær (near, close), Norwegian nær (near, close) Swedish nära (near, close). See also nigh.

Near appears to be derived from (or at the very least influenced by) the North Germanic languages; compare Danish nær (near, close), Norwegian nær (near, close) Swedish nära (near, close), as opposed to nigh, which continues the inherited West Germanic adjective, like Dutch na (close, near), German nah (close, near, nearby), Luxembourgish no (nearby, near, close). Both, however, are ultimately derived from the same Proto-Germanic root: *nēhw (near, close).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: nîr, IPA(key): /nɪə(ɹ)/
  • (US) enPR: nîr, IPA(key): /nɪɹ/
  • (nearsquare merger) IPA(key): /nɛə/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(r)

Adjective

near (comparative nearer, superlative nearest)

  1. Physically close.
    I can't see near objects very clearly without my glasses.
    Stay near at all times.
    Synonym: close
    Antonym: remote
  2. Close in time.
  3. Closely connected or related.
    The deceased man had no near relatives.
  4. Close to one's interests, affection, etc.; intimate; dear.
    A matter of near consequence to me.
  5. Close to anything followed or imitated; not free, loose, or rambling.
  6. So as barely to avoid or pass injury or loss; close; narrow.
  7. Approximate, almost.
  8. (Britain, in relation to a vehicle) On the side nearest to the kerb (the left-hand side if one drives on the left).
    Antonym: off
  9. (dated) Next to the driver, when he is on foot; (US) on the left of an animal or a team.
  10. (obsolete) Immediate; direct; close; short.
  11. (now rare) Stingy; parsimonious. [from 17th c.]
    Don't be near with your pocketbook.
    • 1782, Frances Burney, Cecilia, II.iii.1:
      “[T]o let you know, Miss, he's so near, it's partly a wonder how he lives at all: and yet he's worth a power of money, too.”

Synonyms

  • (physically close): see also Thesaurus:near

Antonyms

  • (physically close): see also Thesaurus:distant

Derived terms

Translations

Adverb

near (comparative nearer, superlative nearest)

  1. At or towards a position close in space or time. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. Nearly; almost.
    He was near unconscious when I found him.
    I jumped into the near-freezing water.
    I near ruptured myself trying to move the piano.
    • 1666, Samuel Pepys, Diary and Correspondence, (1867)
      [] he hears for certain that the Queen-Mother is about and hath near finished a peace with France []
    • 1825, David Hume, Tobias George Smollett, The History of England, page 263
      Sir John Friend had very near completed a regiment of horse.
    • 2003, Owen Parry, Honor's Kingdom, page 365
      Thinking about those pounds and pence, I near forgot my wound.
    • 2004, Jimmy Buffett, A Salty Piece of Land page 315
      "I damn near forgot." He pulled an envelope from his jacket.
    • 2006, Juliet Marillier, The Dark Mirror, page 377
      The fire was almost dead, the chamber near dark.

Usage notes

The sense of nearly or almost is dialect, colloquial, old-fashioned or poetic in certain uses, such as, in many cases, when near is used to directly modify a verb.

Derived terms

  • near-minimal pair
  • near-sighted

Translations

Preposition

near

  1. Physically close to, in close proximity to.
    • 1820, Mary Shelley, Maurice, or The Fisher's Cot:
      He entered the inn, and asking for dinner, unbuckled his wallet, and sat down to rest himself near the door.
    • 1927, H.P. Lovecraft, The Colour Out of Space:
      It shied, balked, and whinnied, and in the end he could do nothing but drive it into the yard while the men used their own strength to get the heavy wagon near enough the hayloft for convenient pitching.
  2. Close to in time.
  3. Close to in nature or degree.
    His opinions are near the limit of what is acceptable.
Usage notes

Joan Maling (1983) shows that near is best analysed as an adjective with which the use of to is optional, rather than a preposition. It has the comparative and the superlative, and it can be followed by enough. The use of to however is usually British.

Antonyms

  • far from

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

near (third-person singular simple present nears, present participle nearing, simple past and past participle neared)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To come closer to; to approach.

Translations

See also

  • near on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • para-
  • nigh

Noun

near (plural nears)

  1. The left side of a horse or of a team of horses pulling a carriage etc.
    Synonym: near side
    Antonym: off side

See also

  • nearside

References

  • near at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Joan Maling (1983), Transitive Adjectives: A Case of Categorial Reanalysis, in F. Henry and B. Richards (eds.), Linguistic Categories: Auxiliaries and Related Puzzles, vol.1, pp. 253-289.

Anagrams

  • Arne, EARN, Earn, Nera, eRNA, earn, erna, nare, rean

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈne.ar/, [ˈneär]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈne.ar/, [ˈnɛːɑr]

Verb

near

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of neō

Latvian

Verb

near

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of neart
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of neart
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of neart
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of neart
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of neart
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of neart

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • ne n

Etymology

From Old Norse niðar, nominative and accusative plural of nið f (waning moon).

Noun

near pl (definite plural neane)

  1. a lunar phase of an old moon, i.e. period of time in which the moon is waning
    Antonym: ny

References

  • “ne” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • aner, Arne, Erna, nare, rane, rena, Rena

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English nevere, from Old English nǣfre.

Adverb

near

  1. never

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN

Source: wiktionary.org
  • situated within a short distance.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)