Poke in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does poke mean? Is poke a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is poke worth? poke how many points in Words With Friends? What does poke mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for poke

See how to calculate how many points for poke.

Is poke a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word poke is a Scrabble US word. The word poke is worth 10 points in Scrabble:

P3O1K5E1

Is poke a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word poke is a Scrabble UK word and has 10 points:

P3O1K5E1

Is poke a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word poke is a Words With Friends word. The word poke is worth 11 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

P4O1K5E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Poke

You can make 12 words from 'poke' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

4 letters words from 'poke'

POKE 10 

3 letters words from 'poke'

KEP 9KOP 9
OKE 7OPE 5

2 letters words from 'poke'

KO 6OE 2
OK 6OP 4
PE 4PO 4

All 4 letters words made out of poke

poke opke pkoe kpoe okpe kope poek opek peok epok oepk eopk pkeo kpeo peko epko kepo ekpo okep koep oekp eokp keop ekop

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word poke. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in poke.

Definitions and meaning of poke

poke

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: pōk, IPA(key): /pəʊk/
  • (US) enPR: pōk, IPA(key): /poʊk/
  • Rhymes: -əʊk

Etymology 1

Middle English, perhaps from Middle Dutch poken or Middle Low German poken (both from Proto-Germanic *puk-), which is probably imitative.

Verb

poke (third-person singular simple present pokes, present participle poking, simple past and past participle poked)

  1. To prod or jab with an object such as a finger or a stick. [from later 14th c.]
  2. To stir up a fire to remove ash or promote burning.
  3. (figuratively) To rummage; to feel or grope around. [from early 19th c.]
    Synonyms: fumble, glaum, root; see also Thesaurus:feel around
  4. (transitive, computing, dated) To modify the value stored in (a memory address).
    Coordinate term: peek
  5. (transitive) To put a poke (device to prevent leaping or breaking fences) on (an animal).
  6. (transitive) To thrust at with the horns; to gore.
  7. (transitive, informal, social media) To notify (another user) of activity on social media or an instant messenger.
  8. (transitive) To thrust (something) in a particular direction such as the tongue.
  9. (transitive, slang, vulgar) To penetrate in sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: drill, nail, pound; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
    • 1996 November 25, Washington Times quoted in The Dictionary of Modern Proverbs[2]:
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

poke (plural pokes)

  1. A prod, jab, or thrust.
  2. (US, slang) A lazy person; a dawdler.
  3. (US, slang) A stupid or uninteresting person.
  4. An old, worn-out horse.
  5. (US) A device to prevent an animal from leaping or breaking through fences, consisting of a yoke with a pole inserted, pointed forward.
  6. (computing, dated) The storage of a value in a memory address, typically to modify the behaviour of a program or to cheat at a video game.
  7. (informal, social media) A notification sent to get another user's attention on social media or an instant messenger.
  8. A poke bonnet.


Derived terms
  • better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick

Etymology 2

From Middle English poke, from Anglo-Norman poke (whence pocket), from Frankish *poka. More at pocket.

Noun

poke (plural pokes)

  1. (now regional) A sack or bag. [from early 13th c.]
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, act 2, scene 7:
      And then he drew a dial from his poke,
      And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye,
      Says very wisely, ‘It is ten o'clock…’
    • 1605, William Camden, Remaines Concerning Brittaine, 1629 edition, Proverbes, page 276:
      When the Pig is proffered, hold vp the poke.
    • 1627, Michael Drayton, Minor Poems of Michael Drayton, 1907 edition, poem Nimphidia:
      And suddainly vntyes the Poke,
      Which out of it sent such a smoke,
      As ready was them all to choke,
      So greeuous was the pother []
    • 1814, September 4, The Examiner, volume 13, number 349, article French Fashions, page 573:
      … and as to shape, a nightmare has as much. Under the poke and the muff-box, the face sometimes entirely disappears …
    • 1946, Mezz Mezzrow and Bernard Wolfe, Really the Blues, Payback Press 1999, page 91:
      In the summertime they'd reach out and snatch your straw hat right off your head, and if you were fool enough to go after it your poke was bound to be lighter when you came out.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 138:
      She did not eat blood-oranges. Her maw gived her one in a poke and she was going to throw it in the bin, Oh it is all black.
  2. A long, wide sleeve.
    Synonym: poke sleeve
  3. (Scotland, Northern Ireland) An ice cream cone.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Either a shortening of, or from the same source as, pocan (pokeweed) (q.v.).

Noun

poke (uncountable)

  1. (dialectal) Pokeweed.
Synonyms
  • see the list at pokeweed
Translations

Etymology 4

Borrowed from Hawaiian poke (literally to cut crosswise into pieces).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpoʊ.keɪ/

Noun

poke (uncountable)

  1. (Hawaii) Slices or cubes of raw fish or other raw seafood, mixed with sesame oil, seaweed, sea salt, herbs, spices, or other flavorful ingredients.
Alternative forms
  • poké
Usage notes

Often typeset as poké to aid pronunciation.

Derived terms
See also
  • ceviche
  • crudo

Anagrams

  • kepo

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpoke/, [ˈpo̞ke̞]
  • Rhymes: -oke
  • Syllabification: po‧ke

Etymology 1

From portsari (doorman).

Noun

poke

  1. (slang) doorman, bouncer (at a bar or nightclub)
Declension

Etymology 2

From porno (pornography).

Noun

poke

  1. (slang) pornography
Declension

Ido

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpoke/

Adverb

poke

  1. slightly

Maori

Adjective

poke

  1. grimy

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • pok, poc, puke

Etymology

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman poke.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔːk(ə)/

Noun

poke (plural pokes)

  1. sack, pouch, bag

Descendants

  • English: poke
  • Yola: poake, pooke

References

  • “pōke, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Old French

Alternative forms

  • poque, pouche, puche

Etymology

From Frankish *poka.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔ.kə/

Noun

poke f (oblique plural pokes, nominative singular poke, nominative plural pokes)

  1. sack
    E puis les poudrez bien de sel e les mettez ensemble en une poke de bon kanevaz

Derived terms

  • poket

Descendants

  • Middle English: poc, poke, pooke
    • English: poke (regional)
    • Scots: pok, poke, polk, poik

Tocharian A

Etymology

From Proto-Tocharian *pokowjä-, earlier *pākewjä-, from pre-Tocharian *bʰeh₂ǵʰow-h₁en- (definite), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵʰús (arm). Compare Tocharian B pokai.

Noun

poke

  1. arm

References

  • Adams, Douglas Q. (2013), “poko*”, in A Dictionary of Tocharian B: Revised and Greatly Enlarged (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 10), Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 434

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to prod.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)