Pop in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does pop mean? Is pop a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is pop worth? pop how many points in Words With Friends? What does pop mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for pop

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Is pop a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word pop is a Scrabble US word. The word pop is worth 7 points in Scrabble:

P3O1P3

Is pop a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word pop is a Scrabble UK word and has 7 points:

P3O1P3

Is pop a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word pop is a Words With Friends word. The word pop is worth 9 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

P4O1P4

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Valid words made from Pop

You can make 3 words from 'pop' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'pop'

POP 7 

2 letters words from 'pop'

OP 4PO 4

All 3 letters words made out of pop

pop opp ppo ppo opp pop

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word pop. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in pop.

Definitions and meaning of pop

pop

Pronunciation

  • (UK, Canada) enPR: pŏp, IPA(key): /pɒp/
  • (US) enPR: pŏp, IPA(key): /pɑp/
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Etymology 1

From Middle English pop, poppe (a blow; strike; buffet) (> Middle English poppen (to strike; thrust, verb)), of onomatopoeic origin – used to describe the sound, or short, sharp actions. The physics sense is part of a facetious sequence "snap, crackle, pop", after the mascots of Rice Krispies cereal.

Noun

pop (countable and uncountable, plural pops)

  1. (countable) A loud, sharp sound as of a cork coming out of a bottle.
  2. (uncountable, regional, Midwestern US, Canada, Britain) An effervescent or fizzy drink, most frequently nonalcoholic; soda pop.
    Lunch was sandwiches and a bottle of pop.
    • 1941, LIFE magazine, 8 September 1941, page 27:
      The best thing on the table was a tray full of bottles of lemon pop.
  3. (countable, regional, Midwestern US, Canada) A bottle, can, or serving of effervescent or fizzy drink, most frequently nonalcoholic; soda pop.
  4. A pop shot: a quick, possibly unaimed, shot with a firearm.
  5. (colloquial, in the phrase "a pop") A quantity dispensed, a portion, apiece.
  6. Something that stands out or is distinctive, especially to the senses.
    a white dress with a pop of red
    a pop of vanilla flavour
  7. (computing) The removal of a data item from the top of a stack.
  8. A bird, the European redwing.
  9. (physics) The sixth derivative of the position vector with respect to time (after velocity, acceleration, jerk, jounce, crackle), i.e. the rate of change of crackle.
  10. (slang, dated) A pistol.
Synonyms
  • (soda pop): see the list at soda
Derived terms
(see below, for Etymology 1)
Translations

Verb

pop (third-person singular simple present pops, present participle popping, simple past and past participle popped)

  1. (intransitive) To make a pop, or sharp, quick sound.
  2. (ergative) To burst (something) with a popping sound.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room, chapter 1:
      The waves came round her. She was a rock. She was covered with the seaweed which pops when it is pressed. He was lost.
    • The court was told Robins had asked if she could use the oven to heat some baby food for her child. Knutton heard a loud popping noise "like a crisp packet being popped" coming from the kitchen followed by a "screeching" noise. When she saw what had happened to the kitten she was sick in the sink.
  3. (intransitive, with in, out, upon, etc.) To enter, or issue forth, with a quick, sudden movement; to move from place to place suddenly; to dart.
    A rabbit popped out of the hole.
    • 1599-1602, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, v 2 65
      He that hath . . ./ Popp'd in between the election and my hopes.
    • I startled at his popping upon me unexpectedly.
    • 1626, John Donne, "On the Nativity", Sermons, iv
      So, diving in a bottomless sea, they [the Roman Church] pop sometimes above water to take breath.
    • 1720, Jonathan Swift, A Letter to a Young Clergyman
      others again have a trick of popping up and down every moment from their paper, to the audience, like an idle schoolboy
    • 1773, Oliver Goldsmith, She Stoops to Conquer, ii
      When company comes, you are not to pop out and stare, and then run in again, like frightened rabbits in a warren.
  4. (transitive, Britain) To place (something) (somewhere); to move or position (something) with a short movement.
  5. (intransitive, Britain, Canada, often with over, round, along, etc.) To make a short trip or visit.
    I'm just popping round to the newsagent.
    I'll pop by your place later today.
  6. (intransitive) To stand out; to be distinctive to the senses.
    This colour really pops.
    • She also looked like a star - and not the Beltway type. On a stage full of stiff suits, she popped.
  7. (transitive) To hit (something or someone).
  8. (transitive, slang) To shoot (usually somebody) with a firearm.
  9. (intransitive, vulgar) To ejaculate.
  10. (transitive, computing) To remove (a data item) from the top of a stack.
    • 2010, Enrico Perla, ‎Massimiliano Oldani, A Guide to Kernel Exploitation: Attacking the Core (page 55)
      Once the callee (the called function) terminates, it cleans the stack that it has been locally using and pops the next value stored on top of the stack.
  11. (transitive, computing) To remove a data item from the top of (a stack).
    • 2011, John Mongan, ‎Noah Kindler, ‎Eric Giguère, Programming Interviews Exposed
      The algorithm pops the stack to obtain a new current node when there are no more children (when it reaches a leaf).
  12. (transitive, slang) To pawn (something) (to raise money).
  13. (transitive, slang) To swallow (a tablet of a drug).
    • 1994, Ruth Garner and Patricia A. Alexander, Beliefs about text and instruction with text:
      We were drinking beer and popping pills — some really strong downers. I could hardly walk and I had no idea what I was saying.
  14. (transitive) This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  15. (transitive, informal) To perform (a move or stunt) while riding a board or vehicle.
    • 1995, David Brin, Startide Rising:
      Huck spun along the beams and joists, making me gulp when she popped a wheelie or swerved past a gaping hole...
    • 2009, Ben Wixon, Skateboarding: Instruction, Programming, and Park Design:
      The tail is the back of the deck; this is the part that enables skaters to pop ollies...
  16. (intransitive, of the ears) To undergo equalization of pressure when the Eustachian tubes open.
Derived terms
(see below, for Etymology 1)
Translations

Interjection

pop

  1. Used to represent a loud, sharp sound, as of a cork coming out of a bottle.
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From papa or poppa.

Noun

pop (plural pops)

  1. (colloquial) Affectionate form of father.
Translations
See also
  • papa, pa
  • pap, paps

Etymology 3

From popular, by shortening.

Adjective

pop (not comparable)

  1. (used attributively in set phrases) Popular.

Noun

pop (uncountable)

  1. Pop music.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From colloquial Russian поп (pop) and Попъ (Pop), from Old Church Slavonic попъ (popŭ), from Byzantine Greek (see pope). Doublet of pope.

Alternative forms

  • pope

Noun

pop (plural pops)

  1. (Russian Orthodoxy, uncommon) A Russian Orthodox priest; a parson.
    • 1822, Mikhaïlov Vasiliï, Adventures of Michailow, 4
      There was at that time in the house of the Consul a Pop (or Russian Priest) named Iwan Afanassich.
    • 2001, Spas Raïkin, Rebel with a Just Cause, 292 n.28
      The contemporary priest's... own children are ashamed and some abusers are openly "transmitting the pop" (a gesture of mocking the priest on the street, where a man would touch his private parts while smiling at other passers-by)
    • 2006, Peter Neville, A Traveller's History of Russia, 123
      By the end of 1809 she was declaring to all and sundry that she would sooner marry 'a pop than the sovereign of a country under the influence of France'. Since a pop was a Russian Orthodox parish priest, the reference was hardly likely to endear her family to the French.

Anagrams

  • OPP, Opp, PPO, opp, opp.

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch pop.

Noun

pop (plural poppe)

  1. doll

Catalan

Etymology 1

From Latin polypus, from Ancient Greek πολύπους (polúpous).

Noun

pop m (plural pops)

  1. octopus
Alternative forms
  • polp
See also
  • calamars

Etymology 2

Abbreviation of popular.

Adjective

pop (indeclinable)

  1. popular

Further reading

  • “pop” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “pop” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “pop” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “pop” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔp/
  • Hyphenation: pop
  • Rhymes: -ɔp

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin pupa; sense of "coccon, pupa" from New Latin.

Noun

pop f or m (plural poppen, diminutive popje n or poppetje n)

  1. doll
  2. cocoon, pupa
  3. (colloquial) guilder
Derived terms

Verb

pop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of poppen
  2. imperative of poppen

Descendants

  • Indonesian: pop

Etymology 2

From English pop, possibly through shortening of popmuziek.

Noun

pop f (uncountable)

  1. pop, pop music

Finnish

Alternative forms

  • poppi (noun only)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpop/, [ˈpo̞p]
  • Rhymes: -op
  • Syllabification: pop

Adjective

pop (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly in compounds) pop (popular)

Noun

pop

  1. pop (popular music)

Declension


French

Pronunciation

Adjective

pop (feminine singular pope, masculine plural pops, feminine plural popes)

  1. pop (popular)

Noun

pop m (plural pop)

  1. pop, pop music

Synonyms

  • musique pop

Further reading

  • “pop” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Etymology

From English pop(ular).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ ˈpop]
  • Rhymes: -op

Noun

pop (plural popok)

  1. (music) pop, pop music

Declension

Derived terms

  • popegyüttes
  • popénekes
  • popfesztivál
  • popzene

References


Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɔp̚]
  • Hyphenation: pop

Etymology 1

From clipping of populer.

Adjective

pop (plural pop-pop)

  1. popular.

Etymology 2

From Dutch pop, from New Latin pupa. Doublet of pupa and popi

Noun

pop (plural, first-person possessive popku, second-person possessive popmu, third-person possessive popnya)

  1. (colloquial) doll.
    Synonym: boneka

Further reading

  • “pop” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Jakaltek

Etymology

From Proto-Mayan *pohp.

Noun

pop

  1. reed mat

References

  • Church, Clarence; Church, Katherine (1955) Vocabulario castellano-jacalteco, jacalteco-castellano[2] (in Spanish), Guatemala C. A.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 47; 41

Navajo

Particle

pop

  1. flirting

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔp/

Noun

pop m inan

  1. pop music

Declension

Noun

pop m pers

  1. Eastern Orthodox priest

Declension


Portuguese

Noun

pop m (uncountable)

  1. pop (music intended for or accepted by a wide audience)

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Old Church Slavonic попъ (popŭ), from Ancient Greek παπάς (papás), variant of πάππας (páppas, daddy, papa).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pôp/

Noun

pȍp m (Cyrillic spelling по̏п)

  1. priest (usually Catholic or Orthodox)

Declension


Slavomolisano

Etymology

From Serbo-Croatian pop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pôp/

Noun

pop m

  1. priest

Declension

References

  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale).

Slovak

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pop/

Etymology 1

From Old Church Slavonic попъ (popŭ), from Ancient Greek παπάς (papás), variant of πάππας (páppas, daddy, papa).

Noun

pop m (genitive singular popa, nominative plural popi, declension pattern of chlap)

  1. priest (usually Catholic or Orthodox)
Declension

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English pop.

Noun

pop m (genitive singular popu, declension pattern of dub)

  1. pop music, pop
Declension

Further reading

  • pop in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpop/

Noun

pop m (plural pops)

  1. (Uruguay) popcorn
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:palomita
  2. pop, pop music

Derived terms


Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English Pope.

Noun

pop

  1. Pope

Turkish

Noun

pop (definite accusative popu, plural poplar)

  1. pop
  2. Pop music

Declension


Volapük

Noun

pop (nominative plural pops)

  1. (obsolete, Volapük Rigik) people, nation

Declension

Synonyms

  • pöp (Volapük Nulik)

Derived terms

  • popik

West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pop/

Noun

pop c (plural poppen, diminutive popke)

  1. baby
  2. doll, dummy, puppet
  3. dear, darling

Further reading

  • “pop”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to make a sharp, small, explosive sound.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)