Rote in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does rote mean? Is rote a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is rote worth? rote how many points in Words With Friends? What does rote mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for rote

See how to calculate how many points for rote.

Is rote a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word rote is a Scrabble US word. The word rote is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

R1O1T1E1

Is rote a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word rote is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

R1O1T1E1

Is rote a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word rote is a Words With Friends word. The word rote is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

R1O1T1E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Rote

You can make 18 words from 'rote' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'rote'

ROTE 4TORE 4

3 letters words from 'rote'

ORE 3ORT 3
REO 3RET 3
ROE 3ROT 3
TOE 3TOR 3

2 letters words from 'rote'

ER 2ET 2
OE 2OR 2
RE 2TE 2
TO 2 

All 4 letters words made out of rote

rote orte rtoe troe otre tore roet oret reot erot oert eort rteo treo reto erto tero etro oter toer oetr eotr teor etor

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word rote. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in rote.

Definitions and meaning of rote

rote

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹəʊt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɹoʊt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊt
  • Homophone: wrote

Etymology 1

From Middle English rote (custom, habit, wont, condition, state), further origin unknown. Found in the Middle English phrase bi rote (by heart, according to form, expertly), c. 1300. Some have proposed a relationship either with Old French rote/rute (route), or Latin rota (wheel) (see rotary), but the OED calls both suggestions groundless.

Noun

rote (uncountable)

  1. Mechanical routine; a fixed, habitual, repetitive, or mechanical course of procedure.
    He could perform by rote any of his roles in Shakespeare.
Usage notes
  • Commonly found in the phrase “by rote” and in attributive use: “rote learning”, “rote memorization”, and so on.
  • Often used pejoratively in comparison with “deeper” learning that leads to “understanding”.
Derived terms
  • rotelike
  • rotely
Translations
See also
  • memoriter
  • muscle memory

Adjective

rote (comparative more rote, superlative most rote)

  1. By repetition or practice.

Verb

rote (third-person singular simple present rotes, present participle roting, simple past and past participle roted)

  1. (obsolete) To go out by rotation or succession; to rotate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Zane Grey to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To learn or repeat by rote.
    [Volumnia to Corolianus] "Because that it lies you on to speak/ to th' people, not by your own instruction,/ Nor by th' matter which your heart prompts you,/ But with such words that are but roted in/ your tongue,..." Coriolanus III.ii.52-55

Etymology 2

From Old Norse rót n (tossing, pitching (of sea)), perhaps related to rauta (to roar); see hrjóta. Compare Middle English routen (to roar, bellow, storm, rage, howl).

Noun

rote (uncountable)

  1. (rare) The roar of the surf; the sound of waves breaking on the shore. [from c. 1600]
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English rote, from Old French rote, probably of German origin; compare Middle High German rotte, and English crowd (a kind of violin).

Noun

rote (plural rotes)

  1. (music) A kind of guitar, the notes of which were produced by a small wheel or wheel-like arrangement; an instrument similar to the hurdy-gurdy.
  2. Synonym of crowd.

References

  • rote at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • tore

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁɔt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Etymology 1

Old French rote, Middle High German rotte

Noun

rote f (plural rotes)

  1. rote (musical instrument)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

rote

  1. first-person singular present indicative of roter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of roter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of roter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of roter
  5. second-person singular imperative of roter

Anagrams

  • ôter, tore

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʁoːtə/

Adjective

rote

  1. inflection of rot:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian

Noun

rote f

  1. plural of rota

Anagrams

  • -tore, Orte, erto, otre

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Late Old English rōt, rōte, from Old Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds. Doublet of wort (plant). See more at English root.

Alternative forms

  • root, roote, rot, rotæ

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈroːt(ə)/

Noun

rote (plural rotes or roten)

  1. The root (submerged part of a plant):
    1. A root used as food; a root vegetable or tuber.
    2. A root employed for supposed curative or medical properties.
  2. The foundation or base of a protuberance or extension of the body:
    1. The root of the hair; the part of the hair within the scalp.
    2. The root of the tooth; the part of the tooth within the scalp.
    3. The root of a nail; the part of a nail within the skin.
    4. The base or attached part of an organ or bodily member.
    5. The base or attached part of a swelling or boil.
  3. Something which generates, creates, or emanates something:
    1. The origin of an abstract quality; that which something originally came from.
    2. A wellspring or exemplar of an abstract quality that which something comes from.
    3. The offspring of a certain individual or nation as a progenitor; a lineage or descent.
  4. The foundation of a tall structure (e.g. a trunk, pole, turret)
  5. The (or a key) foundational or core condition, essence or portion of something.
  6. One who descends from another; a member of an individual's lineage or stock.
  7. The base of a peak or mount; the beginning of an elevation.
  8. A protuberance resembling or functioning like a root.
  9. The most inner, central, or deepest part of something.
  10. (rare, astronomy) Data used for astronomical purposes.
  11. (rare, mathematics) A mathematical root.
Related terms
  • roten (to root)
  • rotynge (rooting)
Descendants
  • English: root
  • Scots: ruit, rute
References
  • “rọ̄te, n.(4).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-23.

Etymology 2

Unknown.

Alternative forms

  • root, roote

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɔːt(ə)/

Noun

rote (uncountable)

  1. Traditional, customary, usual, or habitual behaviour or procedure.
Descendants
  • English: rote
References
  • “rōte, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-22.

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Old French rote, from Latin chrotta, borrowed from a Germanic form such as Old High German hruoza, borrowed itself from a Celtic term deriving from Proto-Celtic *kruttos; compare Welsh crwth. A doublet of crowde.

Alternative forms

  • rotte, roote, roowte

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɔːt(ə)/

Noun

rote (plural rotys)

  1. A musical instrument having strings and similar to a harp.
Descendants
  • English: rote
  • Scots: rote (rare, obsolete)
References
  • “rōte, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-02-22.

Etymology 4

Verb

rote

  1. Alternative form of roten (to rot)

Etymology 5

Verb

rote

  1. Alternative form of roten (to root)

Etymology 6

Adjective

rote

  1. Alternative form of roten (rotten)

Etymology 7

Noun

rote

  1. Alternative form of rot

Neapolitan

Noun

rote

  1. plural of rota

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse róta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /roːtə/

Verb

rote (present tense roter, past tense rota or rotet, past participle rota or rotet)

  1. to untidy, to make a mess
  2. (slang) to fool around (engage in casual or flirtatious sexual acts)

Derived terms

  • rotet (or rotete)
  • rotehue
  • rotekopp

Related terms

  • rot

References

  • “rote” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse róta.

Alternative forms

  • rota (a-infinitive)

Verb

rote (present tense rotar, past tense rota, past participle rota, passive infinitive rotast, present participle rotande, imperative rot)

  1. to untidy
Related terms
  • rot

Etymology 2

Alternative forms

  • ròte (alternative spelling)

Noun

rote m (definite singular roten, indefinite plural rotar, definite plural rotane)

  1. rot
Related terms
  • roten
  • rotna, rotne

Etymology 3

From Old Norse roti, from Middle Low German rote from Old French rote, from Medieval Latin rota, rotta, ruta, rutta (a rout).

Noun

rote f (definite singular rota, indefinite plural roter or rotor, definite plural rotene or rotone)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by rode (see there for more.)

References

  • “rote” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Etymology

Of Celtic origin, from Welsh crwth.

Noun

rote f (oblique plural rotes, nominative singular rote, nominative plural rotes)

  1. rote (musical instrument)

Descendants

  • French: rote
  • Portuguese: rota

Portuguese

Verb

rote

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of rotar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of rotar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of rotar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of rotar

Spanish

Verb

rote

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of rotar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of rotar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of rotar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of rotar.

Swedish

Etymology

Old Swedish rote, from Middle French route, roupte (disorderly flight of troops), literally "a breaking off, rupture," from Vulgar Latin *rupta (a dispersed group), literally "a broken group," from Latin rupta. Related to English rout.

Noun

rote c

  1. a district (of a parish or town, for the purpose of fire fighting, road maintenance, mail forwarding, social care, etc.)
  2. a file, a section, a squad, a pair (of soldiers, of aircraft)
    20 rotar
    twenty file
    med utryckta rotar
    four deep
    indelning av rotar!
    squad-number!

Declension

Related terms

  • brandrote
  • postrote
  • rotechef
  • rotehjon
  • rotepar

See also

  • rotel

References

  • rote in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • rote in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)
  • rote in Walter E. Harlock, Svensk-engelsk ordbok : skolupplaga (1964)

Anagrams

  • Tore, oret

Source: wiktionary.org
  • ROTCHIE, the little auk.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)