Sad in Scrabble Dictionary

What does sad mean? Is sad a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is sad worth? sad how many points in Words With Friends? What does sad mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for sad

See how to calculate how many points for sad.

Is sad a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word sad is a Scrabble US word. The word sad is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

S1A1D2

Is sad a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word sad is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

S1A1D2

Is sad a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word sad is a Words With Friends word. The word sad is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1A1D2

Our tools

Valid words made from Sad

You can make 6 words from 'sad' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'sad'

ADS 4DAS 4
SAD 4 

2 letters words from 'sad'

AD 3AS 2
DA 3 

All 3 letters words made out of sad

sad asd sda dsa ads das

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word sad. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in sad.

Definitions and meaning of sad

sad

Etymology 1

From Middle English sad, from Old English sæd (sated, full), from Proto-Germanic *sadaz (sated, satisfied), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (to satiate, satisfy).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sæd/
  • Rhymes: -æd

Adjective

sad (comparative sadder or more sad, superlative saddest or most sad)

  1. (heading) Emotionally negative.
    1. Feeling sorrow; sorrowful, mournful.
    2. Appearing sorrowful.
    3. Causing sorrow; lamentable.
      • (Can we date this quote by G. K. Chesterton and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
        The Great Gaels of Ireland are the men that God made mad, / For all their wars are merry and all their songs are sad.
    4. Poor in quality, bad; shameful, deplorable; later, regrettable, poor.
      • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, II.127:
        Heaven knows what cash he got, or blood he spilt, / A sad old fellow was he, if you please [].
    5. Of colours: dark, deep; later, sombre, dull.
      • 1646, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, II.5:
        this is either used crude, and called Sulphur Vive, and is of a sadder colour; or after depuration, such as we have in magdeleons of rolls, of a lighter yellow.
      • (Can we date this quote by Izaak Walton and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
        sad-coloured clothes
      • (Can we date this quote by John Mortimer and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
        Woad, or wade, is used by the dyers to lay the foundation of all sad colours.
  2. (obsolete) Sated, having had one's fill; satisfied, weary.
  3. (obsolete) Steadfast, valiant.
  4. (obsolete) Dignified, serious, grave.
    • (Can we date this quote by Chaucer and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      ripe and sad courage
    • (Can we date this quote by John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      which treaty was wisely handled by sad and discrete counsel of both parties
  5. (obsolete) Naughty; troublesome; wicked.
    • 1860, Isaac Taylor, Ultimate Civilization
      Sad tipsy fellows, both of them.
  6. (slang) Unfashionable; socially inadequate or undesirable.
  7. (dialect) Soggy (to refer to pastries).
  8. (obsolete) Heavy; weighty; ponderous; close; hard.
    sad bread
    • (Can we date this quote by Edmund Spenser and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      his hand, more sad than lump of lead
    • (Can we date this quote by John Mortimer and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Chalky lands are naturally cold and sad.
Synonyms
  • (feeling mentally uncomfortable): discomforted, distressed, uncomfortable, unhappy
  • (low in spirits): depressed, down in the dumps, glum, melancholy
  • (moving, full of feeling): poignant, touching
  • (causing sorrow): lamentable
  • (poor in quality): pitiful, sorry
  • See also Thesaurus:sad
  • See also Thesaurus:lamentable
Antonyms
  • happy
  • cheerful
  • gleeful, upbeat
  • decent
Derived terms
  • sadness
  • sadder
  • saddest
  • sadboi
  • sad sack
Related terms
  • sadden
Translations
Further reading
  • sad in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sad in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

Verb

sad (third-person singular simple present sads, present participle sadding, simple past and past participle sadded)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To make melancholy; to sadden or grieve (someone).
    • 16??, John Webster, Appius and Virginia
      My father's wondrous pensive, and withal / With a suppress'd rage left his house displeas'd, / And so in post is hurried to the camp: / It sads me much; to expel which melancholy, / I have sent for company.

Etymology 2

Noun

sad (plural sads)

  1. Alternative form of saad (Arabic letter)

Anagrams

  • ADS, ADs, ASD, AdS, Ads, DA's, DAS, DAs, DSA, SDA, ads, das

Cebuano

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: sad

Adverb

sad

  1. (focus) also; too
  2. (after a negative) either

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsat]

Noun

sad m

  1. orchard

Declension

Derived terms

  • sadař m
  • sadový

Further reading

  • sad in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sad in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Verb

sad

  1. past tense of sidde

Gothic

Romanization

sad

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌰𐌳

Livonian

Alternative forms

  • (Courland) sa'd

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *sadek.

Noun

sad

  1. precipitation (hail, rain, snow)

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ (plant, garden). Cognate with Upper Sorbian sad, Polish sad (orchard), Czech sad (orchard), Russian сад (sad, orchard, garden), Old Church Slavonic садъ (sadŭ, plant, garden).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sat]

Noun

sad m

  1. fruit (food)

Declension


Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *sadaz, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (to satiate, satisfy).

Adjective

sad (comparative sadoro, superlative sadost)

  1. full, sated, satiated
  2. weary

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German sat

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sat/

Noun

sad m inan (diminutive sadek)

  1. orchard

Declension

Related terms

  • (noun) sadownik
  • (adjective) sadowy

Related terms

  • (verb) sadzić

Further reading

  • sad in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sad in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots

Etymology

From Old English sæd.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑd/

Adjective

sad (comparative sadder, superlative saddest)

  1. grave, serious
  2. strange, remarkable
  3. sad

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *sьda, *sьgoda.

Alternative forms

  • sȁda

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sâd/

Adverb

sȁd (Cyrillic spelling са̏д)

  1. now
  2. currently
  3. presently

Etymology 2

From Proto-Slavic *saditi (to plant). Compare Serbo-Croatian saditi and Russian сад (sad)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sâːd/

Noun

sȃd m (Cyrillic spelling са̑д)

  1. plant nursery, plantation, orchard (specialized facility rather than a home garden)
  2. a seeding or sapling from a plant nursery
Declension

References

  • “sad” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • “sad” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sad/, [sat]

Noun

sad m (genitive singular sadu, nominative plural sady, genitive plural sadov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. garden, orchard, plantation

Declension

Derived terms

  • sadový
  • sadík

References

  • sad in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sáːt/

Noun

sȃd m inan

  1. fruit

Inflection

Further reading

  • sad”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Wakhi

Etymology

Compare Tajik сад (sad).

Numeral

sad

  1. hundred

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a bone of the pelvis.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)