Seam in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does seam mean? Is seam a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is seam worth? seam how many points in Words With Friends? What does seam mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for seam

See how to calculate how many points for seam.

Is seam a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word seam is a Scrabble US word. The word seam is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

S1E1A1M3

Is seam a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word seam is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

S1E1A1M3

Is seam a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word seam is a Words With Friends word. The word seam is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1E1A1M4

Our tools

Valid words made from Seam

You can make 25 words from 'seam' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

4 letters words from 'seam'

AMES 6MAES 6
MASE 6MESA 6
SAME 6SEAM 6

3 letters words from 'seam'

AME 5EAS 3
EMS 5MAE 5
MAS 5MES 5
SAE 3SAM 5
SEA 3SMA 5

2 letters words from 'seam'

AE 2AM 4
AS 2EA 2
EM 4ES 2
MA 4ME 4

All 4 letters words made out of seam

seam esam saem asem easm aesm sema esma smea msea emsa mesa same asme smae msae amse mase eams aems emas meas ames maes

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word seam. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in seam.

Definitions and meaning of seam

seam

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siːm/
  • Homophones: seem, seme
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Etymology 1

From Middle English seem, seme, from Old English sēam (seam), from Proto-West Germanic *saum, from Proto-Germanic *saumaz (that which is sewn).

Alternative forms

  • seme (obsolete)

Noun

seam (plural seams)

  1. (sewing) A folded-back and stitched piece of fabric; especially, the stitching that joins two or more pieces of fabric.
    • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  2. A suture.
  3. (geology) A thin stratum, especially of an economically viable material such as coal or mineral.
  4. (cricket) The stitched equatorial seam of a cricket ball; the sideways movement of a ball when it bounces on the seam.
  5. (construction) A joint formed by mating two separate sections of materials.
  6. A line or depression left by a cut or wound; a scar; a cicatrix.
  7. (figuratively) A line of junction; a joint.
    • 1697, Joseph Addison, Essay on Virgil's Georgics
      Precepts should be so finely wrought together [] that no coarse seam may discover where they join.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From the noun seam.

Verb

seam (third-person singular simple present seams, present participle seaming, simple past and past participle seamed)

  1. To put together with a seam.
  2. To make the appearance of a seam in, as in knitting a stocking; hence, to knit with a certain stitch, like that in such knitting.
  3. To mark with a seam or line; to scar.
  4. To crack open along a seam.
    • 1880, Lew Wallace, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
      Later their lips began to parch and seam.
  5. (cricket) Of the ball, to move sideways after bouncing on the seam.
  6. (cricket) Of a bowler, to make the ball move thus.
Quotations
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Skeleton in Armor:
    Thus, seamed with many scars, / Bursting these prison bars, / Up to its native stars / My soul ascended!

Etymology 3

From Old English sēam (a burden), from Latin sagma (saddle).

Noun

seam (plural seams)

  1. (historical) An old English measure of grain, containing eight bushels.
  2. (historical) An old English measure of glass, containing twenty-four weys of five pounds, or 120 pounds.
    • 1952, L. F. Salzman, Building in England, p. 175.
      As white glass was 6s. the 'seam', containing 24 'weys' (pise, or pondera) of 5 lb., and 2½ lb. was reckoned sufficient to make one foot of glazing, the cost of glass would be 1½d. leaving 2½d. for labour.

Etymology 4

From Middle English seime (grease), from Old French saim (fat). Compare French saindoux (lard).

Noun

seam (plural seams)

  1. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) Grease; tallow; lard.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Further reading

  • seam on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • seam (sewing) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • AMEs, ASME, Ames, EMAS, MSAE, Mesa, Same, eams, mase, meas, meas., mesa, same

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *saum, from Proto-Germanic *saumaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sæ͜ɑːm/

Noun

sēam m (nominative plural sēamas)

  1. seam

Declension

Derived terms

  • sēamere
  • sēamestre

Descendants

  • Middle English: seme, seem
    • English: seam

Source: wiktionary.org
  • SEALWAX, sealing wax.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)