Seel in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does seel mean? Is seel a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is seel worth? seel how many points in Words With Friends? What does seel mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for seel

See how to calculate how many points for seel.

Is seel a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word seel is a Scrabble US word. The word seel is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

S1E1E1L1

Is seel a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word seel is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

S1E1E1L1

Is seel a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word seel is a Words With Friends word. The word seel is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1E1E1L2

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Valid words made from Seel

You can make 16 words from 'seel' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

4 letters words from 'seel'

EELS 4ELSE 4
LEES 4SEEL 4
SELE 4SLEE 4

3 letters words from 'seel'

EEL 3ELS 3
LEE 3LES 3
SEE 3SEL 3

2 letters words from 'seel'

EE 2EL 2
ES 2 

All 4 letters words made out of seel

seel esel seel esel eesl eesl sele esle slee lsee else lese sele esle slee lsee else lese eels eels eles lees eles lees

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word seel. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in seel.

Definitions and meaning of seel

seel

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siːl/
  • Homophone: seal

Etymology 1

From Middle English sel, sele, from Old English *sǣle (good, fortunate, happy) (attested in Old English unsǣle (evil, wicked)), from Proto-Germanic *sēliz (good, happy), from Proto-Indo-European *sel-, *sēl- (to calm, quiet, be favourable). Cognate with Danish sæl (blissful), Swedish säll (blissful), Icelandic sæll (blissful), Gothic 𐍃𐌴𐌻𐍃 (sēls, good, kind, useful), Latin sōlor (to comfort, console).

Adjective

seel (comparative more seel, superlative most seel)

  1. (obsolete) Good; fortunate; opportune; happy.

Etymology 2

From Middle English sele, sel, from Old English sǣl (time, occasion, a fit time, season, opportunity, the definite time at which an event should take place, time as in bad or good times, circumstances, condition, position, happiness, joy, good fortune, good time, prosperity), from Proto-Germanic *sēliz (luck, joy), from Proto-Indo-European *sel-, *sēl- (to calm, quiet, be favourable). Cognate with Icelandic sæla (bliss), Dutch zalig (blissful, blessed). More at silly.

Alternative forms

  • seal

Noun

seel (plural seels)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Good fortune; happiness; bliss.
  2. (Britain, dialectal) Opportunity; time; season.
Derived terms
  • barley-seel
  • hay-seel

Etymology 3

From Middle English silen, from Old French siller, ciller (to sew up the eyelids of, hoodwink, wink), from cil (eyelid), from Latin cilium (eyelid, eyelash).

Verb

seel (third-person singular simple present seels, present participle seeling, simple past and past participle seeled)

  1. (falconry) To sew together the eyes of a young hawk.
    • 1651, William Davenant, Gondibert
      Hey who does blindly soar at Rhodalind []
      Mounts, like seel'd doves, still higher []
  2. (by extension) To blind.
Translations

Etymology 4

Ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *sīgan (to drop). Compare Low German sielen (to lead off water), French siller (to run ahead, to make headway), and English sile (transitive verb).

Verb

seel (third-person singular simple present seels, present participle seeling, simple past and past participle seeled)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete, of a ship) To roll on the waves in a storm.
    • c. 1611, Walter Raleigh, Observations on the Navy and Sea Service
      when a Ship seels or rowls in foul Weather

Noun

seel (plural seels)

  1. (obsolete) The rolling or agitation of a ship in a storm.
    • 1636, George Sandys, Paraphrase upon the Psalms and Hymns dispersed throughout the Old and New Testaments
      The ship hulls as the billows flow;
      And all aboard at ev'ry seel,
      Like drunkards, on the hatches reel.

References

  • seel in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • EELS, ELEs, Else, Lees, Slee, eels, else, l'ees, lees, lese, sele

Ingrian

Etymology

Superessive of se (it). Cognates include Finnish siellä and Estonian seal.

Pronunciation

  • (Ala-Laukaa, Hevaha, Soikkola) IPA(key): /ˈseːl/
  • (Ylä-Laukaa) IPA(key): /ˈʃæːl/ (phonemic spelling: šääl)
  • Hyphenation: seel

Adverb

seel

  1. (of location) there

References

  • V. I. Junus (1936) Iƶoran Keelen Grammatikka[1], Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 133
  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 521
  • Olga I. Konkova; Nikita A. Dyachinkov (2014) Inkeroin Keel: Пособие по Ижорскому Языку[2], →ISBN, page 49

Old French

Alternative forms

  • cel, saiel, seal, sel, sele

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *segellum, from Latin sigillum.

Noun

seel m (oblique plural seeaus or seeax or seiaus or seiax or seels, nominative singular seeaus or seeax or seiaus or seiax or seels, nominative plural seel)

  1. seal (means of authentication for a letter, etc.)

Descendants

  • Middle French: sceau
    • French: sceau
      • Norman: sceau
  • Middle English: sel, sele, selle, cel, seal, seale, sealle, seil
    • English: seal
      • Sotho: sili
      • Swahili: sili
    • Scots: seal

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (seel, supplement)
  • seel on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Source: wiktionary.org
  • SEEKER, one who seeks.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)