Si in Scrabble Dictionary

What does si mean? Is si a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is si worth? si how many points in Words With Friends? What does si mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for si

See how to calculate how many points for si.

Is si a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word si is a Scrabble US word. The word si is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

S1I1

Is si a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word si is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

S1I1

Is si a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word si is a Words With Friends word. The word si is worth 2 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1I1

Our tools

Valid words made from Si

You can make 2 words from 'si' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


2 letters words from 'si'

IS 2SI 2

Definitions and meaning of si

si

Alternative forms

  • ti

Etymology

Acronym of Latin Sancte Ioannes, the phrase ending the hymn Ut queant laxis from earlier words of which the other notes of solfège were derived.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /si/

Noun

si (plural sis)

  1. (music) A syllable used in solfège to represent the seventh note of a major scale.

Translations

Anagrams

  • 'is, I's, IS, Is, i's, is, is-

Albanian

Etymology

Varying reconstructions. Orel descends it from Proto-Albanian *tšei, Matzinger from Proto-Albanian *čī. Ultimately from instrumental Proto-Indo-European *kwi-h₁. Compare Latin qui (how, why), Old English hwȳ, hwī (why), Avar čī (čī, how). An interrogative and relative pronoun, especially in connection with a preposition.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [si]

Adverb

si

  1. how; in what way; in what state
  2. like, as

Derived terms

See also

  • qysh

References


Alemannic German

Etymology 1

From Old High German siu, from Proto-Germanic *sī. Cognate with German sie (she; it), Gothic 𐍃𐌹 (si), Old English sēo.

Pronoun

si f

  1. she
  2. it (for referents of the feminine grammatical gender)
Declension

Etymology 2

From Old High German sie m pl, sio f pl, siu n pl. Cognate with German sie, Dutch zij.

Pronoun

si pl

  1. they
Declension

Etymology 3

From Middle High German sein, sīn, from Old High German sīn, from Proto-Germanic *sīnaz. Cognate with German sein, Dutch zijn, West Frisian syn, Icelandic sinn.

Alternative forms

  • siin

Determiner

si

  1. his

Declension

Inflected forms include:

Etymology 4

From Middle High German sīn, from Old High German sīn. Cognate with German sein, Dutch zijn, Low German sien.

Alternative forms

  • sii, siin, sinh, ŝchi

Verb

si

  1. (Gressoney) to be

References

  • “si” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Asturian

Etymology

From Latin si.

Conjunction

si

  1. if

Bahnar

Etymology

From Proto-Bahnaric *ciː, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *ciiʔ (louse); cognate with Vietnamese chí, chấy.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siː/

Noun

si

  1. louse

Belizean Creole

Verb

si

  1. see

References

  • Crosbie, Paul, ed. (2007), Kriol-Inglish Dikshineri: English-Kriol Dictionary. Belize City: Belize Kriol Project, pp. 315–316.

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈsi/
  • Rhymes: -i

Etymology 1

From Old Occitan, from Latin si (if).

Conjunction

si

  1. if

See also

  • si bé
  • si de cas
  • si doncs no
  • si més no
  • si no
  • si per cas
  • si et plau
  • si us plau

Etymology 2

From Latin Sancte Iohannes (Saint John) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist.

Noun

si m (plural sis)

  1. (music) si (seventh note of a diatonic scale)

Etymology 3

From Old Occitan, from Latin sinus.

Noun

si m (plural sins)

  1. cavity, depression
  2. (anatomy) sinus
  3. (figuratively) uterus
  4. front portion of the breast
  5. (figuratively) heart
  6. estuary, bay
See also
  • si d'Abraham m

Etymology 4

From Latin sĭbī.

Pronoun

si

  1. himself, herself, itself
  2. oneself
  3. themselves
  4. each other
Usage notes
  • Si is the stressed (or "strong", or "tonic") form of the reflexive pronoun es. As such, it is used after prepositions.
Declension
See also
  • de si mateix
  • en si
  • entre si
  • fora de si
  • per a si
  • per si mateix
  • tornar en si

See also


Chamorro

Preposition

si

  1. Subject marker for personal names

Chavacano

Etymology 1

From Spanish (yes).

Particle

si

  1. yes

Etymology 2

From Spanish si (if).

Conjunction

si

  1. if

Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • zi (Sette Comuni)

Etymology

From Middle High German si(e), from Old High German siu, from Proto-West Germanic *sī, from Proto-Germanic *sī, nominative singular feminine of *iz. Cognate with German sie.

Pronoun

si

  1. (Luserna) she, it

Inflection

References

  • “si” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɪ/

Pronoun

si (reflexive pronoun)

  1. (dative) to oneself (clitic form of reflexive pronoun sobě)
    myself
    yourself
    himself
    herself
    itself
    ourselves
    yourselves
    themselves

Declension

Synonyms

  • sobě

Related terms

  • se

Further reading

  • si in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • si in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Latin sex.

Numeral

si

  1. six

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siː/, [siːˀ]
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Rhymes: -iː

Noun

si c (singular definite sien, plural indefinite sier)

  1. sieve
  2. strainer
  3. colander

Inflection

Verb

si (imperative si, infinitive at si, present tense sier, past tense siede, perfect tense har siet)

  1. sieve
  2. strain
  3. sift

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

si m or f (plural si's, diminutive sietje n)

  1. musical note; ti

Anagrams

  • is

Esperanto

Etymology

From Italian si, French soi, Spanish se, Latin se, plus the i of personal pronouns.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /si/
  • Hyphenation: si
  • Audio:

Pronoun

si (reflexive, accusative sin, possessive sia)

  1. himself, herself, itself, themselves, oneself

Usage notes

The reflexive pronoun si is only used to refer to the third person (In English: he/she/it/they) not the first or second person (In English: I/you).


Ewe

Verb

si

  1. to escape

Fala

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese se, from Latin (if).

Conjunction

si

  1. if (used to introduce a condition or choice)

Etymology 2

Pronoun

si

  1. Alternative form of se

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /si/
  • Homophones: ci, scie, scies

Etymology 1

From Old French se, from Latin si (if).

Conjunction

si

  1. if
  2. even if

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old French si, from Latin sic (so, thus).

Interjection

si

  1. yes (used to contradict a negative statement) (often followed by I do, he is, etc. in English to indicate contradiction rather than affirmation).
    Synonym: si fait (archaic)

Adverb

si

  1. so, such (intensifier)

Usage notes

The positive particle usage is uncommon in Québec (the adverb is used in Québec as it is everywhere else).

Etymology 3

Noun

si m (plural si)

  1. (music) si, the note 'B'.

Further reading

  • “si” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin se.

Pronoun

si (third person)

  1. (reflexive) himself, herself

Related terms

  • lui

Galician

Etymology 1

From Latin sīc.

Interjection

si

  1. yes
    Antonym: non

Etymology 2

From Latin , ablative and accusative pronoun form.

Pronoun

si (accusative se, dative se)

  1. himself, herself, itself
  2. themselves
Usage notes

The pronoun si is used exclusively as the object of a preposition; no nominative form exists.

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

si m (plural sis)

  1. (music) si (musical note)
  2. (music) B (the musical note or key)
See also
  • (musical notes) nota musical; , re, mi, fa, sol, la, si (Category: gl:Music)

Gothic

Romanization

si

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌹

Guinea-Bissau Creole

Etymology

From Portuguese se and Spanish si. Cognates with Kabuverdianu si.

Conjunction

si

  1. if

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French si.

Conjunction

si

  1. if

Iau

Noun

si

  1. woman

References

  • Bill Palmer, The Languages and Linguistics of the New Guinea Area (→ISBN, 2017), page 531, table 95, Comparative basic vocabulary in Lakes Plain Languages

Indonesian

Article

si

  1. Definite grammatical article (diminutive). There is no exact equivalent of the Indonesian si in languages such as English, but it can be described as a personal definite article. In the American sitcom Happy Days, a character is called The Fonz by his friends; in Indonesian, this could be translated as Si Fonz. Thus it is used when talking about someone else if they are on close, intimate terms with that person. Apart from the more friendly connotation, it is also a diminutive and can stand in for the words "little", "old" and "poor" when talking about others in a cute, disparaging, disrespectful or casual manner. It is used when talking about someone, not to them. It should not be used to those who are of higher rank or deserving of respect (unless mocking them)
  2. Definite grammatical article (title 1) Besides the more humorous uses, si can be a way of putting a name to someone when you do not know that person's name and want to refer to them in an informal, casual or personalised way. This is done by putting si in front of the group, occupation or category to which that person belongs.
  3. Definite grammatical article (title 2) Similar to the preceding use, si is used to refer to all the members of a certain group or category.

Interlingua

Adverb

si

  1. yes

Italian

Alternative forms

  • -si (enclitic)

Etymology

From Latin se (him-, her-, it-, themselves, reflexive third-person pronoun). Cognate with Spanish se and Portuguese se and si.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /si/

Pronoun

si

  1. (reflexive) oneself, himself, herself, itself, themselves
  2. (reciprocal pronoun) each other, one another
  3. (indefinite) one, you, we, they, people
  4. (si passivante) Used to form the passive voice of a verb; it

Usage notes

  • When si is part of an infinitive, it can be placed before it as a separate word, but more often it is attached to the end. In this case, the final -e of the infinitive is dropped, or, in the case of infinitives ending in -rre, the final -re is dropped. Examples: amar(e) + si = amarsi; ridur(re) + si = ridursi.
  • Often translated using the passive voice in English when used as indefinite personal pronoun:
  • Verb + si is often translated as become or get + [past participle] in English.
  • In cases where si (indefinite pronoun) and si (reflexive pronoun) follow each other, the first si is replaced with ci:
    (instead of: *Si si lava.)
  • Becomes se when followed by a third-person direct object clitic (lo, la, li, le, or ne).

See also

Noun

si

  1. (music) si (musical note B)

See also

  • ci

Japhug

Etymology

Probably from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *səj.

Verb

si

  1. die

References

  • Guillaume Jacques, Argument Demotion in Japhug Rgyalrong (2012)

Kabuverdianu

Etymology 1

From Portuguese se and Spanish si

Conjunction

si

  1. if

Etymology 2

From Portuguese sim.

Adverb

si

  1. yes

Koro (India)

Noun

si

  1. water

References

  • Roger Blench, Mark Post, (De)classifying Arunachal languages: Reconstructing the evidence (2011)

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin .

Adjective

si

  1. (possessive) his, her, hers, its, their

Latin

Alternative forms

  • sei (standard in Republican spelling)

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *sei (so, thus) used in parataxis, likely via the meaning "in this" as the locative singular of Proto-Indo-European *só (this, that); this older meaning is preserved in Latin sīc as well as in the oath sī dīs placet, c.f. English so help me God. Related to Old English (he, that).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /siː/
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /si/

Conjunction

  1. if, supposing that

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • si in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • si in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • si in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • si in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • si in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “sī, sīc”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 561

Latvian

Noun

si m (invariable)

  1. (music) si

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zi/

Pronoun

si

  1. third-person feminine singular, nominative: she
  2. third-person feminine singular, accusative: her
  3. third-person plural, nominative: they
  4. third-person plural, accusative: them

Usage notes

  • The feminine singular is used chiefly with feminine words for things. Female persons are predominantly treated as grammatically neuter, though the feminine is not impossible. See hatt for more.

Declension


Malay

Article

si

  1. the (primarily used with people, rarely necessary)
  2. definite particle used with adjectives to describe people
  3. a definite article used in names or nicknames

Synonyms

  • sang

Mandarin

Romanization

si (Zhuyin ˙ㄙ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of ,

si

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mauritian Creole

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /si/

Etymology

From French si.

Conjunction

si

  1. if

Derived terms

Interjection

si

  1. yes (used to contradict a negative statement)

Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ziː/

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch sia.

Alternative forms
  • sie, soe, so

Pronoun

si

  1. she
Inflection
Descendants
  • Dutch: zij
    • Afrikaans: sy
  • Limburgish: zie

Etymology 2

From Old Dutch sia.

Alternative forms
  • sie

Pronoun

si

  1. they (all genders)
Inflection
Descendants
  • Dutch: zij
  • Limburgish: zie

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

si

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of wēsen

Further reading

  • “si (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “si (III)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “si (I)”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Etymology

From Old English sīe, singular subjunctive of wesan, from Proto-Germanic *sijǭ (first person), *sijēs (second person), and *sijē (third person), singular subjunctive forms of *wesaną.

Verb

si

  1. (Early Middle English, rare) Singular present subjunctive form of been

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • se

Etymology

From Old French se.

Adverb

si

  1. if
  2. then (afterwards; following)

Descendants

  • French: si

Middle Low German

Pronunciation

  • Possibly: IPA(key): /siː/
  • Certainly: Stem vowel: ê⁴
    • IPA(key): /siɛ/, /siə/

Pronoun

  1. Alternative form of

Molo

Noun

si

  1. water

References

  • Marvin Lionel Bender, Topics in Nilo-Saharan linguistics (1989)
  • [2]

Mòcheno

Etymology

From Middle High German si(e), from Old High German siu, from Proto-West Germanic *sī, from Proto-Germanic *sī, nominative singular feminine of *iz. Cognate with German sie.

Pronoun

si

  1. she, it

Inflection

References

  • “si” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.

Nalca

Noun

si

  1. tooth
  2. name

Norman

Etymology

From Old French si, from Latin si (if).

Conjunction

si

  1. (Guernsey) if

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse segja, from Proto-Germanic *sagjaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ-.

Pronunciation

Verb

si (imperative si, present tense sier, passive sies, past tense sa, past participle sagt, present participle siende)

  1. to say
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Noun

si (uncountable)

  1. (music) seventh note of a major scale

Etymology 3

Synonymous with side (side)

Noun

si (uncountable)

  1. side
Usage notes

This term is only used idiomatically in the phrase på si.

Etymology 4

Determiner

si

  1. feminine singular of sin

See also

References

  • “si” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “si” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siː/
  • Homophone: sid

Determiner

si

  1. feminine singular of sin

Etymology 2

Noun

si (uncountable)

  1. (music) seventh note of a major scale

Etymology 3

Synonymous with side (side)

Noun

si (uncountable)

  1. side
Usage notes

This term is only used idiomatically in the phrase på si.

References

  • “sin” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “si” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Alternative forms

  • se
  • s' (before a vowel)

Etymology 1

From Latin sic.

Adverb

si

  1. so; thus; in such a way

Descendants

  • French: si
  • Norman: si

Etymology 2

See se.

Conjunction

si

  1. Alternative form of se (if)

Old Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin sīc (thus; so), from Proto-Indo-European *so (this, that).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsi/

Adverb

si

  1. yes, affirmatively
    • 13th century, attributed to Alfonso X of Castile, Cantigas de Santa Maria, E codex, cantiga 84 (facsimile):
      ſi ou non
      yes or no

Descendants

  • Fala:
  • Galician: si
  • Portuguese: sim

Old Saxon

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /si/

Article

si

  1. feminine nominative singular of

Declension



Papiamentu

Etymology 1

From Spanish si and Portuguese se and Kabuverdianu si.

Conjunction

si

  1. if
  2. when

Etymology 2

From Spanish and Portuguese sim and Kabuverdianu si.

Adverb

si

  1. yes

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal, Brazil) IPA(key): /si/
  • Hyphenation: si

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese si, from Latin sibi, from Proto-Indo-European *sébʰye, dative of *swé (self). Cognate with French soi, Italian , Spanish .

Alternative forms

  • sy (obsolete)

Pronoun

si (reflexive)

  1. (following a preposition) oneself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, yourselves, themselves.
See also

Etymology 2

From Latin Sancte Iohannes (Saint John) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist.

Noun

si m (plural sis)

  1. si (musical note)
Coordinate terms
  • (C major scale) escala de dó maior; , , mi, , sol, , si

Etymology 3

Conjunction

si

  1. Eye dialect spelling of se, representing Brazil Portuguese.

Romani

Verb

si

  1. to be
  2. there be
  3. Used with the accusative of personal pronoun to to indicate possession in place of a verb meaning English have

Conjugation

Derived terms

Usage notes

  • The personal pronoun is often omitted when this term is used to mean "to be".

References

  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018), “si”, in ニューエクスプレス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, →ISBN, page 143



Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) sen, se
  • (Puter, Vallader)

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin, root , from .

Adverb

  1. up, upward, upwards

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

Pronoun

  1. Replaces the dative of a personal pronoun when the subject is of the same person as the dative object; to oneself (clitic dative singular of )
    1. to myself
    2. to yourself
    3. to himself, herself, itself
    4. to ourselves
    5. to yourselves
    6. to themselves
  2. one's, of oneself ()

Declension

Verb


Slovak

Pronunciation

Verb

  1. : ((you) are, (thou) art)

Pronoun

  1. Replaces the dative of a personal pronoun when the subject is of the same person as the dative object. Roughly comparable with to oneself or for oneself.

Further reading

  • si in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Slovene

Pronunciation

Verb

Pronunciation

Pronoun


Spanish

Etymology

From .

Pronunciation

Conjunction

  1. if

Derived terms

See also


Swahili

Adverb

  1. not

Tagalog

<span id="attentionseekingtl" class="attentionseeking" lang="tl" title="">

Article


Ternate

Adverb

  1. first, firstly

References

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001). A Descriptive Study of the Language of Ternate, the Northern Moluccas, Indonesia. University of Pittsburgh.

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From .

Noun

  1. sea
  2. waves; breakers; swells

Vietnamese

Etymology

From , from ; cognate with , , , .

Pronunciation

Noun

(classifier )

  1. certain members of the Mallotus and Ficus genera

Volapük

Interjection

  1. yes

Walloon

Etymology

From , from .

Conjunction

  1. if

Welsh

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

  1. murmur, hum
  2. rumour

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From , from , from . See also .

Pronunciation

Verb

  1. To see

Related terms


Zhuang

Etymology

From .

Pronunciation

Noun

  1. city

Derived terms


Zou

Noun

  1. blood

Verb

  1. die

References

  • http://www.languageinindia.com/feb2013/zouphonologyfinal.pdf

Source: wiktionary.org
  • SHYPOO, (Australian slang) liquor of poor quality.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)