Sic in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does sic mean? Is sic a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is sic worth? sic how many points in Words With Friends? What does sic mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for sic

See how to calculate how many points for sic.

Is sic a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word sic is a Scrabble US word. The word sic is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

S1I1C3

Is sic a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word sic is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

S1I1C3

Is sic a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word sic is a Words With Friends word. The word sic is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1I1C4

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Valid words made from Sic

You can make 4 words from 'sic' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'sic'

CIS 5SIC 5

2 letters words from 'sic'

IS 2SI 2

All 3 letters words made out of sic

sic isc sci csi ics cis

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word sic. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in sic.

Definitions and meaning of sic

sic

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sĭk, IPA(key): /sɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk
  • Homophones: sick, Sikh (one pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Latin sīc (thus, so).

Adverb

sic (not comparable)

  1. Thus; thus written; used to indicate, for example, that text is being quoted as it is from the source.
    • Joseph Wright, his predecessor in the chair, called him ‘a firstrate Scholar and a kind of man who will easily make friends’ at Oxford (quoted, sic, in E.M. Wright, The Life of Joseph Wright (1932), p. 483).
    • 2010, Paul Booth, Digital Fandom: New Media Studies, Peter Lang →ISBN, page 127
      Jim’s Interests: General: Working out, hanging out at the local bars, expanding my mind, eating Tuna Sandwhiches...or so I’m told and poker... Television: ... this show that’s on Thuresday nights at 8 :30pm... I can’t place the name of it but it has this crazy interview style thing...[all sic]
    • 2012, Milton J. Bates, The Bark River Chronicles: Stories from a Wisconsin Watershed, Wisconsin Historical Society →ISBN, page 271
      whole bussiness: Quoted sic in George F. Willison, Saints and Strangers (New York: Reynal and Hitchcock, 1945)
Usage notes

Sic is frequently used to indicate that an error or apparent error of spelling, grammar, or logic has been quoted faithfully; for instance, quoting the U.S. Constitution:

The House of Representatives shall chuse [sic] their Speaker ...

Sic is often set off from surrounding text by parentheses or brackets, which sometimes enclose additional notes, as:

  • 1884, James Grant, Cassell’s old and new Edinburgh, page 99:
    This I may say of her, to which all that saw her will bear record, that her only countenance moved [sic, meaning that its expression alone was touching], although she had not spoken a word []

Because it is not an abbreviation, it does not require a following period.

Related terms
  • sic passim (used to indicate that the preceding word, phrase, or term is used in the same manner (or form) throughout the remainder of a text)
  • sic transit gloria mundi (fame is temporary; lit. “so passes the glory of the world”)
  • sic semper tyrannis (“thus always to tyrants”, a quotation attributed to Brutus at the assassination of Caesar, and shouted in reference by John Wilkes Booth after he assassinated Abraham Lincoln)
Translations

Verb

sic (third-person singular simple present sics, present participle siccing, simple past and past participle sicced)

  1. To mark with a bracketed sic.
    E. Belfort Bax wrote “… the modern reviewer’s taste is not really shocked by half the things he sics or otherwise castigates.”

Etymology 2

Variant of seek.

Alternative forms

  • sick

Verb

sic (third-person singular simple present sics, present participle siccing, simple past and past participle sicced)

  1. (transitive) To incite an attack by, especially a dog or dogs.
    He sicced his dog on me!
  2. (transitive) To set upon; to chase; to attack.
    Sic ’em, Mitzi.
Usage notes
  • The sense of “set upon” is most commonly used as an imperative, in a command to an animal.
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • -ics, CIS, CIs, CSI, ICS, ICs, I²Cs, SCI, Sci., cis, cis-, sci, sci.

Dutch

Etymology

From Latin sīc (thus, so).

Pronunciation

Adverb

sic

  1. sic (thus)

Usage notes

Same usage notes as in English apply.


French

Etymology

From Latin sīc (thus, so). Doublet of si.

Adverb

sic

  1. sic (thus)

Usage notes

Same usage notes as in English apply.

Further reading

  • “sic” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Alternative forms

  • sīce (non-apocopated)
  • seic (standard in Republican spelling)
  • seice

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /siːk/, [s̠iːk]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /sik/, [sik]

Etymology

Regular apocope of sīce, from +‎ -ce, from Proto-Indo-European *só (this, that) and Proto-Indo-European *ḱe- (demonstrative particle). See also components for cognates.

Adverb

sīc (not comparable)

  1. thus, so, like this, in this way
    • 45 BC, Cicero, Tusculanae Disputationes, Book II.42
      Ut ager, quamvis fertilis, sine cultura fructuosus esse non potest, sic sine doctrina animus.
      Just as the field, however fertile, without cultivation cannot be fruitful, likewise the soul without education.
    1. as stated or as follows, to this effect
    2. (as a correlative to ut, quōmodo etc.)
    3. (with restrictive or conditional force, also with ut or )
    4. in such a (good or bad) way, like that, so much

Synonyms

  • ita
  • hōc modō
  • ad hunc modum
  • in hunc modum
  • adeō
  • tam
  • tantopere

Descendants

Derived terms

  • sīcin(e) (intensified interrogative sīc)
  • sīcut(i) (as)
  • sīc trānsit glōria mundī
  • sīc semper tyrannīs
  • ut sīc dīcam (so to speak)

Related terms

References

  • sic in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sic in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sic in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • sic in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[3], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Portuguese

Adverb

sic (not comparable)

  1. sic (used to indicate that a quoted word has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text)

Scots

Alternative forms

  • sich

Etymology

From Middle English sich, from Old English swelc.

Adjective

sic (not comparable)

  1. such

Pronoun

sic

  1. such

Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • zȉc

Etymology

From Upper German Sitz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sît͡s/

Noun

sȉc m (Cyrillic spelling си̏ц)

  1. (regional) seat (of a vehicle)

Synonyms

  • sjȅdalo

References

  • “sic” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Source: wiktionary.org
  • of or like a sibyl.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)