Sist in Scrabble Dictionary

What does sist mean? Is sist a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is sist worth? sist how many points in Words With Friends? What does sist mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for sist

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Is sist a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word sist is a Scrabble US word. The word sist is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

S1I1S1T1

Is sist a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word sist is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

S1I1S1T1

Is sist a Words With Friends word?

The word sist is NOT a Words With Friends word.

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Valid words made from Sist

You can make 11 words from 'sist' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'sist'

SIST 4SITS 4

3 letters words from 'sist'

ITS 3SIS 3
SIT 3TIS 3

2 letters words from 'sist'

IS 2IT 2
SI 2ST 2
TI 2 

All 4 letters words made out of sist

sist isst ssit ssit isst sist sits ists stis tsis itss tiss ssti ssti stsi tssi stsi tssi ists sits itss tiss stis tsis

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word sist. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in sist.

Definitions and meaning of sist

sist

Etymology

Latin sistō (I bring to a stand, stop).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪst

Verb

sist (third-person singular simple present sists, present participle sisting, simple past and past participle sisted)

  1. (law, Scotland) To stay (e.g. judicial proceedings); to delay or suspend; to stop
  2. (law, Scotland) to cause to take a place, as at the bar of a court; hence, to cite; to summon; to bring into court
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir W. Hamilton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Some, however, have preposterously sisted nature as the first or generative principle.

Noun

sist (plural sists)

  1. (law, Scotland) a stay or suspension of proceedings
    • 1693, James Dalrymple Stair, The institutions of the law of Scotland (page 755)
      Fourteen Days are only allowed for Sists of Execution, from the Date the Bill was signed, for the Clerks inquiring in the Condition of the Cautioner []

Anagrams

  • SITs, Sits, ists, sits

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪst

Verb

sist

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of sissen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of sissen

Kurdish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɪst/

Adjective

sist

  1. weak

Latvian

Etymology

The origin of this word is not entirely clear. It has been compared with Ancient Greek κεντέω (kentéō, to prick, to pierce), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱent- (to pierce): its zero grade *ḱn̥t would have yielded Proto-Baltic *šint-, whence Latvian sīt-, probably the stem of archaic term sīts (hunting spear). This hypothesis, however, does not explain the short i in the present stem sit- (with the s in the infinitive from *sit-ti > sist). A possibly better hypothesis is to derive sist from Proto-Indo-European *sey- (to stretch one's arm; tension, strength): its zero grade *si- would have yielded Proto-Baltic *sit- with an extra t, whence sit-ti > sist. The meaning would have changed from “to flex one's muscles” to “to use one's muscles (to hit),” whence “to hit.”

Pronunciation

Verb

sist tr. or intr., 1st conj., pres. situ, sit, sit, past situ

  1. (intransitive, often with a dative complement) to hit, to strike, to beat (move a body part or an object in order to touch so as to inflict pain, injury or death; to hit in order to change or direct an object)
  2. (transitive) to hit, to strike, to beat (something)
  3. (colloquial, in armed combat) to hit (to attack, defeat the enemy)
  4. (transitive) to hit, beat (move a body part or an object in order to touch in order to change or direct an object in a desirable way, or to obtain a certain effect, to make noise, etc.)
  5. (transitive) to hit, to break (to cause something to split or shatter)
  6. (transitive, in table or card games) to hit, to get (to obtain a piece or card from one's opponent, according to the rules of the game)
  7. (transitive) to slam, to shut (or also to open) noisily, violently (e.g., a door, window, etc.)
  8. to hit, to beat (to make noise by rapidly touching something; to play a percussion instrument)
  9. (in the 3rd person; of clocks) to hit, to strike (to produce noise so as to indicate the time)
  10. (intransitive, in the 3rd person; of one's heart or pulse) to beat, to pulse strongly and rapidly
  11. (in the 3rd person) to hit, to strike, to throw, to shoot (to move fast and strongly against something; to cause motion in something)
  12. (intransitive, in the 3rd person) to hit, to strike (to have a sudden, powerful effect on the sensory organs)
  13. (transitive) to move (a body part) suddenly
  14. (colloquial) to hit (to type, to write down with a typewriter or similar device)
  15. (colloquial) to hit, to churn, to stir into a foam or paste

Conjugation

Derived terms

prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:
  • sisties
  • sitējs, sitēja
  • sitiens

See also

  • belzt
  • dunkāt

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse síðastr

Adjective

sist (neuter singular sist, definite singular and plural siste)

  1. last (final)
    sist, men ikke minst - last but not least
    aller siste - very last
    de siste dagene - the last few days
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse sízt

Adverb

sist

  1. last, lastly

References

  • “sist” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɪst/ (example of pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Old Norse síðastr.

Adjective

sist (indefinite singular sist, definite singular and plural siste)

  1. last
Derived terms
  • i det siste
  • i siste liten
  • sistemann

Etymology 2

From Old Norse sízt.

Adverb

sist

  1. last

References

  • “sist” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Verb

sist

  1. past participle of seoir

Polabian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *šestь.

Numeral

sist

  1. six (6)

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse sízt.

Pronunciation

Adjective

sist

  1. last (final)

Adverb

sist

  1. last, lastly

Source: wiktionary.org