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Yes. The word so is a Scrabble US word. The word so is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

S1O1

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Yes. The word so is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

S1O1

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2 letters words from 'so'

OS 2SO 2

Definitions and meaning of so

so

Etymology 1

From Middle English so, swo, zuo, swa, swe, from Old English swā, swǣ, swē (so, as, the same, such, that), from Proto-West Germanic *swā, from Proto-Germanic *swa, *swē (so), from Proto-Indo-European *swē, *swō (reflexive pronomial stem). Cognate with Scots sae (so), West Frisian sa (so), Low German so (so), Dutch zo (so), German so (so), Danish (so), Norwegian Nynorsk so, Swedish ("so, such that"), Old Latin suad (so), Albanian sa (how much, so, as), Ancient Greek ὡς (hōs, as), Urdu سو(, hence)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: , IPA(key): /səʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /soʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophones: sew, soh, sow, soy (some non-standard dialects)

Conjunction

so

  1. In order that.
  2. With the result that; for that reason; therefore.
  3. (archaic) Provided that; on condition that, as long as.
    • 1594, William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act III, Scene 1,[1]
      Speed. ‘Item: She doth talk in her sleep.’
      Launce. It’s no matter for that, so she sleep not in her talk.
    • 1644, John Milton, Areopagitica, London, p. 35,[2]
      [] though all the windes of doctrin were let loose play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously by licencing and prohibiting to misdoubt her strength.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, p. 111,[3]
      I went away very well satisfy’d, not caring where I was sent, so it was but out of his Sight; for he now became more my Aversion than ever.
Usage notes

Chiefly in North American use, a comma or pause is often used before the conjunction when used in the sense with the result that. (A similar meaning can often be achieved by using a semicolon or colon (without the so), as for example: He drank the poison; he died.)

Synonyms
  • (in order that): so that, that
Translations

Adverb

so (not comparable)

  1. To the (explicitly stated) extent that.
  2. (informal) To the (implied) extent.
    1. (informal) Very (positive clause).
      • Captain Edward Carlisle [] felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, []; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed the fate which had assigned such a duty, cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to meet so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard.
    2. (informal) Very (negative clause).
    3. (slang, chiefly US) Very much.
      • 1963, Mike Hawker, Ivor Raymonde (music and lyrics), Dusty Springfield (vocalist), I Only Want to Be with You (single),
        Don′t know what it is that makes me love you so, / I only know I never want to let you go.
  3. In a particular manner.
  4. In the same manner or to the same extent as aforementioned; also.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn." ¶ "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
  5. (with as): To such an extent or degree; as.
Usage notes
  • Use of so in the sense to the implied extent is discouraged in formal writing; spoken intonation which might render the usage clearer is not usually apparent to the reader, who might reasonably expect the extent to be made explicit. For example, the reader may expect He is so good to be followed by an explanation or consequence of how good he is. Devices such as use of underscoring and the exclamation mark may be used as a means of clarifying that the implicit usage is intended; capitalising SO is also used. The derivative subsenses very and very much are similarly more apparent with spoken exaggerated intonation.
  • The difference between so and very in implied-extent usage is that very is more descriptive or matter-of-fact, while so indicates more emotional involvement. For example, she is very clever is a simple statement of opinion; she is so clever suggests admiration. Likewise, that is very typical is a simple statement; that is SO typical of him! is an indictment. A formal (and reserved) apology may be expressed I am very sorry, but after elbowing someone in the nose during a basketball game, a man might say, Dude, I am so sorry! in order to ensure that it's understood as an accident.
Synonyms
  • (very): really, truly, that, very
  • (to a particular extent): that, this, yea
  • (in a particular manner): like this, thus
  • (slang: very much): really, truly, very much
Derived terms
Translations
References

Adjective

so (comparative more so, superlative most so)

  1. True, accurate.
    • “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
  2. In that state or manner; with that attribute. A proadjective that replaces the aforementioned adjective phrase.
    • 1823, Andrew Reed, Martha
      If this separation was painful to all parties, it was most so to Martha.
    • 1872, Charles Dickens, J., The Personal History of David Copperfield
      But if I had been more fit to be married, I might have made you more so too.
  3. (dated, Britain, slang) Homosexual.
Synonyms
  • (true): correct, right, true
  • (euphemistic: homosexual): musical, one of the family, one of them, that way inclined
Derived terms
  • make it so
  • more so
Translations

Interjection

so

  1. Used after a pause for thought to introduce a new topic, question or story.
    Synonyms: look, well, see, hey
  2. Short for so what.
  3. Used to connect previous conversation or events to the following question.
  4. (archaic) Be as you are; stand still; used especially to cows; also used by sailors.
Usage notes

Though common for a long time, the "sentence-initial so" became controversial in the mid-2010s.

Translations

Etymology 2

Pronoun

so

  1. Abbreviation of someone.
Synonyms
  • sb (somebody)

Etymology 3

Shortened from sol, to make it an open syllable for uniformity with the rest of the scale.

Noun

so (plural sos)

  1. (music) A syllable used in solfège to represent the fifth note of a major scale.
Translations

Etymology 4

Borrowed from Japanese (so).

Noun

so (uncountable)

  1. (foods) A type of dairy product, made especially in Japan between the seventh and 10th centuries, by reducing milk by boiling it.

See also

  • So (dairy product) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Another photo of so at Wikicommons

Further reading

  • so at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • so in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

References

Anagrams

  • -os, -os-, O&S, O's, O. S., O.S., OS, OS., Os, o's, o.s., os

Aiwoo

Verb

so

  1. to stand (be in a standing position)

References

  • Ross, M. & Næss, Å. (2007) , “An Oceanic origin for Äiwoo, the language of the Reef Islands?”, in Oceanic Linguistics, volume 46, issue 2. Cited in: "Äiwoo" in Greenhill, S.J., Blust, R., & Gray, R.D. (2008). The Austronesian Basic Vocabulary Database: From Bioinformatics to Lexomics. Evolutionary Bioinformatics, 4:271-283.

Asturian

Etymology 1

From Latin sub.

Preposition

so

  1. under
Derived terms
  • sol

Etymology 2

From Latin suus (his, her, its)

Adjective

so m sg (feminine singular so, neuter singular so, masculine plural sos, feminine plural sos)

  1. his, her, its
  2. your (polite)
  3. their

Pronoun

so

  1. his, hers
  2. yours (polite)

Related terms

  • suyu

Etymology 3

Alternative forms

  • soi

Verb

so

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ser

Basque

Noun

so

  1. look

Brokskat

Pronoun

so

  1. he

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈsɔ/

Etymology 1

From Old Occitan son (compare Occitan son), from Latin sonus (compare French son, Spanish son, sueno, Italian suono).

Noun

so m (plural sons)

  1. sound
Related terms
  • sonar
  • sònic

Etymology 2

Verb

so

  1. Obsolete form of sóc.

Further reading

  • “so” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “so” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “so” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “so” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse sýr, from Proto-Germanic *sūz, from Proto-Indo-European *sū-.

Noun

so c (singular definite soen, plural indefinite søer)

  1. sow (female pig)
  2. (derogatory) slut

Declension

References

  • “so” in Den Danske Ordbog

Elfdalian

Etymology

From Old Norse svá, from Proto-Germanic *swa, *swē. Cognate with Swedish .

Adverb

so

  1. so, like that, in that manner
  2. so, to such a degree

Esperanto

Pronunciation

Noun

so (accusative singular so-on, plural so-oj, accusative plural so-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter S.

See also

  • (Latin-script letter names) litero; a, bo, co, ĉo, do, e, fo, go, ĝo, ho, ĥo, i, jo, ĵo, ko, lo, mo, no, o, po, ro, so, ŝo, to, u, ŭo, vo, zo

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse svá, from Proto-Germanic *swa, *swē (so), from Proto-Indo-European *swē, *swō (reflexive pronomial stem).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /soː/
  • Rhymes: -oː
  • Homophone: soð

Adverb

so (not comparable)

  1. so, thus, as
  2. then

Folopa

Alternative forms

  • sou

Noun

so

  1. woman

References

  • Karl James Franklin, Pacific Linguistics (1973, →ISBN, page 130: Polopa so/sou woman, cf. DAR sou female animal but we woman.
  • Karl J. Franklin, Comparative Wordlist 1 of the Gulf District and adjacent areas (1975), page 15: Boro, Suri, Tebera sou, Sopese šo
  • Carol Anderson, Beginning Folopa Language Lessons and Simple Glossary (2010) (as so)

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin suus.

Pronoun

so (third-person singular possessive of masculine singular, of feminine singular , of masculine plural siei, of feminine plural sôs)

  1. (used attributively) his, her, its; of his, hers, its
  2. (used predicatively) his, hers, its
  3. (used substantively) his, hers, its; the thing belonging to him, her,it

See also

  • gno
  • lôr
  • nestri
  • to
  • vuestri

Galician

Alternative forms

  • su

Etymology

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese so, su, sob, from Latin sub.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sʊ]

Preposition

so

  1. under, beneath

References

  • “so” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “so” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.

German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *swā, from Proto-Germanic *swa, *swē, compare with Old Dutch so and Dutch zo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zoː/
  • Rhymes: -oː

Adverb

so

  1. so, such, that
  2. as (followed by an adjective or adverb plus wie in a statement of equality)
  3. thus, like this/that, in this/that way, in this/that manner
  4. then (in that case)
  5. (colloquial) expletive; sometimes intensifying, sometimes with no noticeable meaning

Derived terms

  • einfach so

Conjunction

so

  1. (archaic) an, if

Synonyms

  • falls

Pronoun

so

  1. (obsolete, relative) that, which, who
    (Augsburger Bekenntnis)

Synonyms

  • der
  • welcher

Gothic

Romanization

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐍉

Indonesian

Adverb

so

  1. Alternative form of sok

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sˠɔ/

Determiner

so

  1. Munster form of seo (used after a word ending in a velarized (“broad”) consonant)
    • 1939, Peig Sayers, “Inghean an Cheannaidhe”, printed in Marie-Louise Sjoestedt, Description d’un parler irlandais de Kerry, Bibliothèque de l'École des Hautes Études 270. Paris: Librairie Honoré Champion, p. 193:

Further reading

  • "so" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Italian

Alternative forms

  • (misspelling)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɔ/
  • Rhymes:

Verb

so

  1. first-person singular present indicative of sapere (I know)

Japanese

Romanization

so

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Ladino

Verb

so (Latin spelling)

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ser

Luxembourgish

Verb

so

  1. second-person singular imperative of soen

Mauritian Creole

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /so/

Etymology 1

From French son

Pronoun

so

  1. (possessive) his, her, its, one's

Etymology 2

From French chaud

Adjective

so

  1. hot, warm.

Antonyms

  • fre

Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch , from Proto-West Germanic *swā, from Proto-Germanic *swa.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zoː/

Adverb

  1. so, like that, in that manner
  2. so, to such a degree
  3. (so ... alse) as
  4. then, in that case
  5. so, therefore

Conjunction

  1. if, in the case that
  2. like, as
  3. (so ... so) both ... and

Descendants

  • Dutch: zo
  • Limburgish: zoe, zoea

Etymology 2

Weakened form of soe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zoː/, /zo/

Pronoun

  1. (chiefly Flemish) Alternative form of si (she)

Further reading

  • “so (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “so (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929) , “so”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Middle English

Pronoun

so

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) Alternative form of sche

References

  • “she, (pron.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 9 May 2018.

Northern Sami

Etymology

Borrowed from Norwegian .

Pronunciation

Adverb

so

  1. so, then, in that case
  2. so, to this or that extent

Further reading

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[4], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Norse svá, from Proto-Indo-European *swa. Akin to English so.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suː/

Adverb

so

  1. so
  2. that
  3. as
  4. then

Conjunction

so

  1. so

References

  • “so” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *swā, from Proto-Germanic *swa.

Adverb

  1. so, like that, in that manner

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch:
    • Dutch: zo
    • Limburgish: zoe, zoea

Further reading

  • “sō (I)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • sa, se, sea, seo, siu

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *so (this), from Proto-Indo-European *só.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /so/

Determiner

so

  1. this (used after the noun, which is preceded by the definite article)

Derived terms

  • inso

Descendants

  • Irish: seo
  • Scottish Gaelic: seo
  • Manx: shoh

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *swā, from Proto-Germanic *swa.

Adverb

  1. so, like that, in that manner

Pali

Alternative forms

Pronoun

so

  1. he, it

Adjective

so

  1. masculine nominative singular of ta (that)

Rawa

Noun

so

  1. grass

References

  • Norma Toland, Donald Toland, Reference Grammar of the Karo/Rawa Language (1991)

Romani

Adverb

so

  1. what

Rwanda-Rundi

Etymology

From Proto-Bantu *có.

Noun

 class 1a (plural bāsó class 2a)

  1. your father
  2. your paternal uncle

Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • sȏl (Croatian)

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *solь, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂ls.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sôː/

Noun

 f (Cyrillic spelling со̑)

  1. (Bosnia, Serbia) salt

Declension


Slavomolisano

Etymology

From Serbo-Croatian so.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /so/

Noun

so m

  1. salt

Declension

References

  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale).

Slovak

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɔ/

Preposition

so (+ instrumental)

  1. with

Synonyms

  • s

Further reading

  • so in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɔ́/

Verb

  1. third-person plural present of bíti

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /so/

Etymology 1

From Latin sub, from Proto-Italic *supo, from Proto-Indo-European *upo.

Preposition

so

  1. (archaic) under
Usage notes

So is very rare in modern Spanish, surviving only in certain expressions, including so pena de (on pain of, under penalty of), so pretexto de or so color de (under pretext of), a so capa (secretly, with bribery).

Pronoun

so

  1. you (emphatic, derogatory)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English so.

Interjection

so

  1. (US, Puerto Rico, El Salvador) so

Etymology 3

Interjection

so

  1. whoa!

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse sýr, from Proto-Germanic *sūz, from Proto-Indo-European *sū-.

Noun

so c

  1. (rare) sow, female pig

Usage notes

  • The more common synonym is sugga, especially for the plural form.

Declension

Synonyms

  • sugga

Anagrams

  • OS, os

Tok Pisin

Etymology 1

From English saw.

Noun

so

  1. saw

Etymology 2

From English show.

Noun

so

  1. show

Veps

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *soo.

Noun

so

  1. swamp, marsh, bog

Inflection

Derived terms

  • sohein
  • sokesk

References

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007) , “болото”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

Vietnamese

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [sɔ˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [ʂɔ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [ʂɔ˧˧] ~ [sɔ˧˧]

Etymology 1

Verb

so

  1. (transitive) to compare
  2. (transitive) to pair up
  3. (intransitive) to straighten one's shoulders, as if to compare one's height to another's
Synonyms
  • (to compare): so sánh

Etymology 2

Compare  (, “first”).

Adjective

so

  1. firstborn
Derived terms
  • con so

Etymology 3

Noun

(classifier con) so

  1. Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, mangrove horseshoe crab

Volapük

Adverb

so

  1. so

Welsh

Verb

so

  1. (colloquial, South Wales) second-person singular present negative of bod
  2. (colloquial, South Wales) third-person singular present negative of bod
  3. (colloquial, South Wales) first-person plural present negative of bod
  4. (colloquial, South Wales) second-person plural present negative of bod
  5. (colloquial, South Wales) third-person plural present negative of bod

Usage notes

Unlike other negative verb forms, this form—and sa, which is used for the first-person singular—is not complemented by ddim after the subject.


Xhosa

Pronoun

-so

  1. Combining stem of sona.

Zulu

Pronoun

-so

  1. Combining stem of sona.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a side channel of a river.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)