Sot in Scrabble Dictionary

What does sot mean? Is sot a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is sot worth? sot how many points in Words With Friends? What does sot mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for sot

See how to calculate how many points for sot.

Is sot a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word sot is a Scrabble US word. The word sot is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

S1O1T1

Is sot a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word sot is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

S1O1T1

Is sot a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word sot is a Words With Friends word. The word sot is worth 3 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1O1T1

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Valid words made from Sot

You can make 5 words from 'sot' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'sot'

SOT 3 

2 letters words from 'sot'

OS 2SO 2
ST 2TO 2

All 3 letters words made out of sot

sot ost sto tso ots tos

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word sot. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in sot.

Definitions and meaning of sot

sot

Etymology

From Middle English sot, from Old English sot, sott (foolish, stupid), of obscure origin and relation. Compare Dutch zot (silly), French sot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • Homophone: sought (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Noun

sot (plural sots)

  1. (archaic) stupid person; fool
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, act 3 scene 2
      Remember / First to possess his books; for without them / He's but a sot, as I am []
    • (Can we date this quote by Oldham and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      In Egypt oft has seen the Sot bow down, / And reverence some deified Baboon.
  2. drunkard
    • (Can we date this quote by Roscommon and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Every sign / That calls the staring sots to nasty wine.

Synonyms

  • (stupid person): See also Thesaurus:idiot (intelligence) or Thesaurus:fool (wisdom)
  • (drunkard): alcoholic, souse, suck-pint; See also Thesaurus:drunkard

Derived terms

  • sottish

Translations

Verb

sot (third-person singular simple present sots, present participle sotting, simple past and past participle sotted)

  1. To drink until one becomes drunk
  2. To stupefy; to infatuate; to besot.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I hate to see a brave, bold fellow sotted.

Derived terms

  • besot
  • sotted
  • sot-weed

Translations

Anagrams

  • OST, OTS, OTs, TOS, TOs, TSO, Tso, ost

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • sod [sod] (Gheg)
  • σὸτ [sot] (Arvanite)

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *tˢjādīti, from Pre-Albanian (post-Proto-Indo-European) *ḱyeh₂ dh₂itéy, dative-locative compound, literally ‘this day’. Same type of construction as sonte, sivjet. See ditë, which is related to the second component.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sot]

Adverb

sot

  1. today

References


Catalan

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈsɔt/

Noun

sot m (plural sots)

  1. pit

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Latin exsūctus (compare Italian asciutto, Venetian suto, Friulian sut, Spanish enjuto, Portuguese enxuto) or Latin suctus (compare Romanian supt).

Adjective

sot

  1. dry

Faliscan

Etymology

Cognate with Latin sunt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsoːt/

Verb

sōt

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of esu

French

Etymology

From Middle French sot, from Old French soz, from Medieval Latin sottus (foolish), of uncertain origin, possibly a Semitic borrowing: Aramaic [script needed] (s(h)ote, fool), Hebrew שטן(sat, transgressor, rebel) or [script needed] (s(h)atooy, drunk), [script needed] (s(h)atyan, drunkard).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /so/

Adjective

sot (feminine singular sotte, masculine plural sots, feminine plural sottes)

  1. silly, foolish, stupid

Noun

sot m (plural sots, feminine sotte)

  1. imbecile, fool

Derived terms

  • sottise

Further reading

  • “sot” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

References

  • Mozeson, Isaac (2000): The Word: The Dictionary That Reveals the Hebrew Source of English

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin subtus, which is derived from Latin sub. Cognate to Ladin sot, Romansch sut, suot, Venetian sóto, Italian sotto, French sous, Romanian sub, supt.

Preposition

sot

  1. under, beneath, underneath
  2. below, south of

Adverb

sot

  1. down
  2. underneath
  3. below

Derived terms

  • disot

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin subtus.

Pronunciation

Adverb

sot

  1. under, beneath
  2. below

Luxembourgish

Verb

sot

  1. inflection of soen:
    1. second-person plural present/preterite indicative
    2. first/third-person singular preterite indicative
    3. second-person plural imperative

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English sot, sott, of obscure origin.

Alternative forms

  • sotte, sote, sott, soth

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɔt/, /sɔːt/

Noun

sot (plural sottes or (Early ME) sotten)

  1. One who lacks wisdom, knowledge, or intelligence; a stupid person.
  2. A villainous or dishonest individual; a rogue or scoundrel.
  3. (derogatory) Used as a general-purpose insult.
Derived terms
  • sotie
  • sotliche
  • sotschipe
  • sotten
Descendants
  • English: sot
  • Scots: sot
References
  • “sot, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-06-14.

Adjective

sot (plural and weak singular sotte)

  1. idiotic, unwise
References
  • “sot, adj.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-06-14.

Etymology 2

From Old English sōt.

Noun

sot

  1. Alternative form of soot (soot)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse sót, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

Noun

sot f or m (definite singular sota or soten, uncountable)
sot n (definite singular sotet, uncountable)

  1. soot

References

  • “sot” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “sot” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse sót, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

Noun

sot f or n (definite singular sota or sotet, uncountable)

  1. soot

References

  • “sot” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *sōtą, from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /soːt/

Noun

sōt n

  1. soot

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: soot, sot, sote, soote
    • English: soot
    • Scots: sute, suit

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /soːt/

Noun

sōt f

  1. sickness

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: sot

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suːt/

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish sōt, from Old Norse sót, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

Noun

sot n

  1. soot

Declension

Related terms

  • sota
  • sotare

Etymology 2

From Old Swedish sōt, from Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz

Noun

sot c

  1. (archaic) disease, sickness

Declension

Derived terms

Anagrams

  • ost, ots, sto

Volapük

Noun

sot (nominative plural sots)

  1. a sort
  2. a kind
  3. a type

Declension

Synonyms

  • bid

Zoogocho Zapotec

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish azote, from Arabic السَوْط‎(as-sawṭ, the whip).

Noun

sot

  1. whip
  2. whipping, beating

Derived terms

  • chgoꞌo sot

References

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[1] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 273

Source: wiktionary.org
  • SOSTENUTO, (Italian) a piece played in a sustained or drawn out manner.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)