Stem in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does stem mean? Is stem a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is stem worth? stem how many points in Words With Friends? What does stem mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for stem

See how to calculate how many points for stem.

Is stem a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word stem is a Scrabble US word. The word stem is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

S1T1E1M3

Is stem a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word stem is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

S1T1E1M3

Is stem a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word stem is a Words With Friends word. The word stem is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1T1E1M4

Our tools

Valid words made from Stem

You can make 16 words from 'stem' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

4 letters words from 'stem'

METS 6STEM 6
TEMS 6 

3 letters words from 'stem'

EMS 5EST 3
MES 5MET 5
SET 3TES 3

2 letters words from 'stem'

EM 4ES 2
ET 2ME 4
ST 2TE 2

All 4 letters words made out of stem

stem tsem setm estm tesm etsm stme tsme smte mste tmse mtse semt esmt smet mset emst mest tems etms tmes mtes emts mets

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word stem. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in stem.

Definitions and meaning of stem

stem

Pronunciation

  • enPR: stĕm, IPA(key): /stɛm/
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Etymology 1

From Middle English stem, stemme, stempne, stevin, from Old English stemn, from Proto-Germanic *stamniz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, stay).

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.
    • 1633, George Herbert, Church Monuments
      While I do pray, learn here thy stem / And true descent.
  2. A branch of a family.
  3. An advanced or leading position; the lookout.
    • Wolsey sat at the stem more than twenty years.
  4. (botany) The above-ground stalk (technically axis) of a vascular plant, and certain anatomically similar, below-ground organs such as rhizomes, bulbs, tubers, and corms.
    • 1736, Sir Walter Raleigh, The History of the World in Five Books
      After they are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough nor twig in the trunk or the stem.
  5. A slender supporting member of an individual part of a plant such as a flower or a leaf; also, by analogy, the shaft of a feather.
  6. A narrow part on certain man-made objects, such as a wine glass, a tobacco pipe, a spoon.
  7. (linguistics) The main part of an uninflected word to which affixes may be added to form inflections of the word. A stem often has a more fundamental root. Systematic conjugations and declensions derive from their stems.
  8. (slang) A person's leg.
    • 2008, Lori Wilde, Rhonda Nelson, Cara Summers, August Harlequin Blaze
      She was perfectly, fuckably proportioned everywhere else, both above and below her waist. A pocket-size Venus, with the longest stems he'd ever seen on someone so dang diminutive.
  9. (slang) The penis.
  10. (typography) A vertical stroke of a letter.
  11. (music) A vertical stroke marking the length of a note in written music.
    Synonyms: tail, (obsolete) virgula
  12. (music) A premixed portion of a track for use in audio mastering and remixing.
  13. (nautical) The vertical or nearly vertical forward extension of the keel, to which the forward ends of the planks or strakes are attached.
  14. (cycling) A component on a bicycle that connects the handlebars to the bicycle fork.
  15. (anatomy) A part of an anatomic structure considered without its possible branches or ramifications.
  16. (slang) A crack pipe; or the long, hollow portion of a similar pipe (i.e. meth pipe) resembling a crack pipe.
  17. (chiefly Britain) A winder on a clock, watch, or similar mechanism.
Derived terms
Translations
References

“stem” in the Collins English Dictionary

Verb

stem (third-person singular simple present stems, present participle stemming, simple past and past participle stemmed)

  1. To remove the stem from.
  2. To be caused or derived; to originate.
  3. To descend in a family line.
  4. To direct the stem (of a ship) against; to make headway against.
  5. (obsolete) To hit with the stem of a ship; to ram.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.ii:
      As when two warlike Brigandines at sea, / With murdrous weapons arm'd to cruell fight, / Doe meete together on the watry lea, / They stemme ech other with so fell despight, / That with the shocke of their owne heedlesse might, / Their wooden ribs are shaken nigh a sonder []
  6. To ram (clay, etc.) into a blasting hole.
Synonyms
  • (to originate, stem from): to be due to, to arise from
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English stemmen, a borrowing from Old Norse stemma (to stop, stem, dam) (whence Danish stemme/stæmme (to stem, dam up)), from Proto-Germanic *stammijaną. Cognate with German stemmen, Middle Dutch stemmen, stempen. Compare stammer.

Verb

stem (third-person singular simple present stems, present participle stemming, simple past and past participle stemmed)

  1. (transitive) To stop, hinder (for instance, a river or blood).
    to stem a tide
    • [They] stem the flood with their erected breasts.
  2. (skiing) To move the feet apart and point the tips of the skis inward in order to slow down the speed or to facilitate a turn.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:hinder
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. Alternative form of steem

Etymology 4

Acronym of science, technology, engineering, (and) mathematics.

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. Alternative form of STEM
    • 2015 May 29th, BBC News, How do US black students perform at school?
      Stem (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields are a particular cause for concern because within them there are more pronounced stereotypes, extreme competitiveness and gender inequities regarding the abilities and competencies of black male and female students.

Further reading

  • stem in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • stem in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “stem”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • EMTs, Mets, Smet, TEMs, mets

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛm/

Etymology 1

From Dutch stem, from Middle Dutch stemme, from Old Dutch *stemma, from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō.

Noun

stem (plural stemme)

  1. vote
  2. voice

Etymology 2

From Dutch stemmen.

Verb

stem (present stem, present participle stemmende, past participle gestem)

  1. to vote

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch stemme, from Old Dutch *stemma, from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō. Under influence of Latin vox (voice, word), it acquired the now obsolete sense of “word”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛm/
  • Hyphenation: stem
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Noun

stem f (plural stemmen, diminutive stemmetje n)

  1. voice, sound made by the mouth using airflow
  2. the ability to speak
  3. vote
  4. (obsolete) word
  5. (phonetics) voice, property formed by vibration of the vocal cords

Derived terms

  • foertstem
  • proteststem

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: stem
  • Negerhollands: stem
  • Indonesian: setem
  • Papiamentu: stèm
  • Sranan Tongo: sten

Verb

stem

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stemmen
  2. imperative of stemmen

Anagrams

  • mest, mets

Latin

Verb

stem

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of stō

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

stem

  1. imperative of stemme

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

stem

  1. imperative of stemme

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English stamp.

Noun

stem

  1. stamp

Source: wiktionary.org
  • starlike; having starlike spots.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)