Sub in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does sub mean? Is sub a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is sub worth? sub how many points in Words With Friends? What does sub mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for sub

See how to calculate how many points for sub.

Is sub a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word sub is a Scrabble US word. The word sub is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

S1U1B3

Is sub a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word sub is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

S1U1B3

Is sub a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word sub is a Words With Friends word. The word sub is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1U2B4

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Valid words made from Sub

You can make 3 words from 'sub' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'sub'

BUS 5SUB 5

2 letters words from 'sub'

US 2 

All 3 letters words made out of sub

sub usb sbu bsu ubs bus

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word sub. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in sub.

Definitions and meaning of sub

sub

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sŭb, IPA(key): /sʌb/
  • Rhymes: -ʌb
  • Hyphenation: sub

Etymology 1

Shortened form of any of various words beginning with sub-.

Noun

sub (plural subs)

  1. A submarine.
  2. A submarine sandwich: a sandwich made on a long bun.
  3. (informal) A substitute, often in sports.
    • 1930, Boy's Live, Philip Scruggs, There Can Be Victory, page 20
      At any other school you would be playing varsity, and Wallace has you pigeon-holed on the subs." "Maybe he has his reasons," Jim replied. "And he hasn't pigeon-holed me on the subs yet — not this season.
  4. (Britain, informal, often in plural) A subscription: a payment made for membership of a club, etc.
    • 1951, H. L. Gold, “Annual Report” in Galaxy Science Fiction, volume 2, number 6, page 2:
      According to the best available information, GALAXY has several times as many subs as any other science fiction magazine!
  5. (Internet, informal) A subtitle.
  6. (computing, programming) A subroutine (sometimes one that does not return a value, as distinguished from a function, which does).
    • 2002, Nathan Patwardhan, Ellen Siever, Stephen Spainhour, Perl in a nutshell
      The default accessor can be overridden by declaring a sub of the same name in the package.
    • 2004, P. K. McBride, Introductory Visual Basic.NET (page 49)
      So far, all the subs and functions that we have used have been those built into the system, or those written to handle events from controls []
  7. (colloquial) A subeditor.
  8. (colloquial) A subcontractor.
  9. (BDSM, informal) A submissive.
  10. (colloquial, dated) A subordinate.
  11. (colloquial, dated) A subaltern.
    • 1911, J. Milton Hayes, The Green Eye of the Yellow God
      He was known as 'Mad Carew' by the subs at Khatmandu,
      He was hotter than they felt inclined to tell;
      But for all his foolish pranks, he was worshipped in the ranks,
      And the Colonel's daughter smiled on him as well.
  12. (colloquial, Internet) A subscription (or (by extension) a subscriber) to an online channel or feed.
  13. (colloquial) Subsistence money: part of a worker's wages paid before the work is finished.
Synonyms
  • (submarine sandwich): submarine, submarine sandwich; grinder, hero, hero sandwich, hoagie, po' boy, spuckie, torpedo, wedge
Hypernyms
  • (submarine sandwich): sandwich
Translations

Verb

sub (third-person singular simple present subs, present participle subbing, simple past and past participle subbed)

  1. (US, informal) To substitute for.
  2. (US, informal) To work as a substitute teacher, especially in primary and secondary education.
  3. (Britain, informal, soccer) To replace (a player) with a substitute.
    He never really made a contribution to the match, so it was no surprise when he was subbed at half time.
  4. (Britain, informal, soccer) Less commonly, and often as sub on, to bring on (a player) as a substitute.
    He was subbed on half way through the second half, and scored within minutes.
  5. (Britain) To perform the work of a subeditor or copy editor; to subedit.
  6. (Britain, slang, transitive) To lend.
  7. (slang, intransitive) To subscribe.
  8. (BDSM) To take a submissive role.
    • 2012, Alicia White, Jessica's Breakdown (page 53)
      You've never subbed before. Jessica will be expecting a man on stage that follows orders and enjoys what she's going to be doing. Do you want to be spanked? Possibly whipped?

See also

  • switch (one who is willing to take either a sadistic or a masochistic role)

Etymology 2

From Latin sub.

Preposition

sub

  1. Under.

Verb

sub (third-person singular simple present subs, present participle subbing, simple past and past participle subbed)

  1. To coat with a layer of adhering material; to planarize by means of such a coating.
  2. (microscopy) To prepare (a slide) with a layer of transparent substance to support and/or fix the sample.
    • 1997, Marina A. Lynch, S. M. O'Mara (editors), Ali D. Hames, D. Rickwood (series editors), Neuroscience Labfax, page 166,
      Ensure that gloves are worn when handling subbed slides. Although the following protocol describes subbing with gelatin, slides may also be coated with either 3-(triethoxysilyl-)propylamine (TESPA) or poly-L-lysine for in situ hybridization.

Anagrams

  • Bus., SBU, UBS, USB, bus, bus.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English sub.

Pronunciation

Noun

sub c (plural subs)

  1. submarine, sub

Esperanto

Etymology

From Latin sub.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sub/
  • Hyphenation: sub

Preposition

sub

  1. under, below

Antonyms

  • super

Ido

Preposition

sub

  1. under, below

Italian

Noun

sub m or f (invariable)

  1. skin-diver, scuba diver
  2. bottom, submissive (BDSM partner)

Synonyms

  • (scuba diver): subacqueo

See also

  • dom

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *supo, from Proto-Indo-European *upó.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /sub/, [s̠ʊb]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /sub/, [sub]

Preposition

sub (+ accusative, ablative)

  1. (with ablative) under, beneath
  2. (with ablative) behind
  3. (with ablative) at the feet of
  4. (with ablative) within, during
  5. (with ablative) about, around (time); just before, just after, shortly before, shortly after
  6. (with accusative) under, up to, up under, close to (of a motion)
  7. (with accusative) until, before, up to, about

Derived terms

  • sub rosā
  • subter
  • subtus
  • supīnus

Descendants

References

  • sub in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sub in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sub in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • sub in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Romanian

Alternative forms

  • (popular) subt, supt

Etymology

From Latin subtus, from sub, from Proto-Italic *supo, from Proto-Indo-European *upo. Compare Aromanian sum

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sub/

Preposition

sub (+accusative)

  1. under, below, beneath, underneath

Derived terms

  • dedesubt

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsub/, [ˈsuβ̞]

Preposition

sub

  1. under

Swedish

Noun

sub c

  1. (slang) a subwoofer, a bass loudspeaker; Contraction of subwoofer.

Declension

See also

  • subba
  • subbe

Anagrams

  • bus

Source: wiktionary.org
  • SUAVE, sophisticated and smoothly affable.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)