Tan in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does tan mean? Is tan a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is tan worth? tan how many points in Words With Friends? What does tan mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for tan

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Is tan a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word tan is a Scrabble US word. The word tan is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

T1A1N1

Is tan a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word tan is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

T1A1N1

Is tan a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word tan is a Words With Friends word. The word tan is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

T1A1N2

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Valid words made from Tan

You can make 7 words from 'tan' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'tan'

ANT 3NAT 3
TAN 3 

2 letters words from 'tan'

AN 2AT 2
NA 2TA 2

All 3 letters words made out of tan

tan atn tna nta ant nat

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word tan. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in tan.

Definitions and meaning of tan

tan

Translingual

Symbol

tan

  1. (trigonometry) A symbol of the trigonometric function tangent.

Synonyms

  • tg

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tæn/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French tan (tanbark), from Gaulish tanno- (green oak) – compare Breton tann (red oak), Old Cornish tannen –, from Proto-Celtic *tannos (green oak), of uncertain origin, but perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *(s)dʰonu (fir). Per this hypothesis, related to Hittite [script needed] (tanau, fir), Latin femur, genitive feminis (thigh), German Tann (woods), Tanne (fir), Albanian thanë (cranberry bush), Ancient Greek θάμνος (thámnos, thicket), Avestan 𐬚𐬀𐬥𐬎𐬎𐬀𐬭𐬆(θanuuarə), Sanskrit धनु (dhánu).

Noun

tan (plural tans)

  1. A yellowish-brown colour.
  2. A darkening of the skin resulting from exposure to sunlight or similar light sources.
    She still has a tan from her vacation in Mexico.
  3. The bark of an oak or other tree from which tannic acid is obtained.
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

tan (comparative tanner, superlative tannest)

  1. Of a yellowish-brown.
    Mine is the white car parked next to the tan pickup truck.
  2. Having dark skin as a result of exposure to the sun.
    You’re looking very tan this week.
Translations

Etymology 2

As a verb, from Middle English tannen, from late Old English tannian (to tan a hide), from Latin tannare.

Verb

tan (third-person singular simple present tans, present participle tanning, simple past and past participle tanned)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To change to a tan colour due to exposure to the sun.
    No matter how long I stay out in the sun, I never tan. though I do burn.
  2. (transitive) To change an animal hide into leather by soaking it in tannic acid. To work as a tanner.
  3. (transitive, informal) To spank or beat.
    • 1876, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 3:
      "Well, go 'long and play; but mind you get back some time in a week, or I'll tan you."
Translations
Derived terms
Related terms
See also
  • Appendix:Colors

Etymology 3

From a Brythonic language; influenced in form by yan (one) in the same series.

Numeral

tan

  1. (dialect, rare) The second cardinal number two, formerly used in Celtic areas, especially Cumbria and parts of Yorkshire, for counting sheep, and stitches in knitting.

Etymology 4

Borrowed from Armenian թան (tʿan).

Noun

tan

  1. An Armenian drink made of yoghurt and water similar to airan and doogh

Translations

Etymology 5

From the Cantonese pronunciation of

Noun

tan (usually uncountable, plural tans)

  1. Synonym of picul, particularly in Cantonese contexts.

Etymology 6

From Old English tān (twig, switch), from Proto-Germanic *tainaz (rod, twig, straw, lot).

Noun

tan (plural tans)

  1. (dialectal) A twig or small switch.
Related terms
  • mistletoe

References

Anagrams

  • -ant, ANT, Ant, Ant., NAT, NTA, Nat, Nat., TNA, a'n't, an't, ant, ant-, ant., nat

Ainu

Alternative forms

  • taan

Etymology

From ta (this) +‎ an (is), literally this being.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [tan]

Adjective

tan (Kana spelling タン, plural tanokay)

  1. (demonstrative) this

Derived terms

  • tanpe (tanpe, this)
  • tanto (tanto, today)

See also


Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *teɸnets (fire) (compare Old Irish teine, Welsh tân).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtãːn/

Noun

tan m (plural tanioù)

  1. fire

Inflection


Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈtan/
  • Rhymes: -an

Adverb

tan

  1. so, such
  2. (in comparisons, tan ... com) as ... as

Derived terms

Related terms

  • tant (so much, so many)

Further reading

  • “tan” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Chuukese

Noun

tan

  1. dream

Cornish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *teɸnets (fire) (compare Old Irish teine, Welsh tân).

Noun

tan m (plural tanow)

  1. fire

Mutation


French

Etymology

Probably from Gaulish *tanno- (oak), from Latin tannum (oak bark) (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?). Ultimately from Proto-Celtic *tanno- (green oak).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɑ̃/

Noun

tan m (plural tans)

  1. pulped oak bark used in the tanning process (i.e. of tanning leather)

Further reading

  • “tan” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Fula

Alternative forms

  • tun (Pular)

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

tan

  1. only

Usage notes

  • Common to all varieties of Fula (Fulfulde / Pulaar / Pular). (however tun is more common in Pular of Futa Jalon)

Adverb

tan

  1. only

Usage notes

  • Common to all varieties of Fula (Fulfulde / Pulaar / Pular). (however tun is more common in Pular of Futa Jalon)

References

  • M.O. Diodi, Dictionnaire bilingue fulfuldé-français, français-fulfuldé, Niger(?), 1994.
  • M. Niang, Pulaar-English English-Pulaar Standard Dictionary, New York: Hippocrene Books, 1997.
  • D. Osborn, D. Dwyer, and J. Donohoe, A Fulfulde (Maasina)-English-French Lexicon: A Root-Based Compilation Drawn from Extant Sources Followed by English-Fulfulde and French-Fulfulde Listings, East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1993.
  • F.W. de St. Croix and the Centre for the Study of Nigerian Languages, Bayero University, Fulfulde-English Dictionary, Kano: The Centre, 1998.
  • F.W. Taylor, Fulani-English Dictionary, Oxford University Press, 1932. (New York:Hippocrene Books, 2005)

Galician

Adverb

tan

  1. so, as (in comparisons)

Usage notes

  • Usually paired with como and coma, as tan [] como/coma

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French temps (time, weather).

Noun

tan

  1. time
  2. weather

Hungarian

Etymology

Back-formation from tanít, tanul, etc. Created during the Hungarian language reform which took place in the 18th–19th centuries.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ ˈtɒn]
  • Hyphenation: tan
  • Rhymes: -ɒn

Noun

tan (plural tanok)

  1. doctrine, lore
  2. science of, theory, branch of instruction
  3. (as a suffix in compounds) -logy, -ology, -graphy (a branch of learning; a study of a particular subject)
    Synonym: tudomány
  4. (as a prefix in compounds) educational, academic
    Synonym: tanulmányi

Declension

Derived terms

  • tanár

Further reading

  • tan in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’An Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Japanese

Romanization

tan

  1. Rōmaji transcription of たん

Mandarin

Romanization

tan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of tān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of tán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of tǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of tàn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish tan, from Proto-Celtic *tanā ((point in) time), from Proto-Indo-European *tn̥néh₂, from *ten- (to stretch).

Noun

tan f

  1. (point in) time

Derived terms

  • in tan (when)
  • in tan sin (then)

Descendants

  • Irish: tan

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “tan, tain”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *tainaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɑːn/

Noun

tān m (nominative plural tānas)

  1. twig, branch

Declension

Derived terms

  • mistiltān

Old French

Etymology

From Gaulish *tannos (attested in the place names Tannetum and Tannogilum), from Proto-Celtic *tannos (green oak).

Noun

tan m (oblique plural tans, nominative singular tans, nominative plural tan)

  1. pulped oak bark used in the tanning process (i.e. of tanning leather)

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *tanā ((point in) time), from Proto-Indo-European *tn̥néh₂, from *ten- (to stretch).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tan/

Noun

tan f

  1. (point in) time

Declension

Derived terms

  • in tan (when)

Descendants

  • Middle Irish: tan
    • Irish: tan

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “tan, tain”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Old Occitan

Alternative forms

  • tant

Etymology

Latin tantus.

Adverb

tan

  1. such; so much; to such and extent

Adjective

tan

  1. such; so much

References

  • von Wartburg, Walther (1928-2002) , “tantus”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 131, page 85

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse tǫnn, from Proto-Germanic *tanþs.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tan/

Noun

tan f

  1. tooth

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: tand

Somali

Determiner

tan

  1. this (feminine)

Spanish

Etymology

From tanto, from Latin tam.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tan/, [t̪ãn]
  • Rhymes: -an

Adverb

tan

  1. so, as

Usage notes

Usually paired with como: tan [] como - "as [] as"

or with que: tan [] que - "so [] that"

Determiner

tan

  1. such, such a

Derived terms


Sranan Tongo

Etymology

From English stand.

Verb

tan

  1. to stay, to reside
  2. to stay, to remain in a state

Turkish

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish طاك(taŋ), from Common Turkic *daŋ.

Noun

tan (definite accusative tanı, plural tanlar)

  1. dawn, twilight

Declension

Synonyms

  • seher
  • şafak

Vietnamese

Etymology

Non-Sino-Vietnamese reading of Chinese (SV: tán, tản).

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [taːn˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [taːŋ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [taːŋ˧˧]

Verb

tan • (, , , )

  1. to melt
  2. to dissolve, dissipate

Derived terms

References

  • Lê Sơn Thanh, "Nom-Viet.dat", WinVNKey (details)

Welsh

Alternative forms

  • (under): dan, o dan

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *tan, from Proto-Celtic *tanai, dative of *tanā, from Proto-Indo-European *tn̥néh₂.

Preposition

tan (triggers soft mutation on a following noun)

  1. until
  2. under
  3. while

Usage notes

In literary Welsh, tan can mean both "under" and "until". In Welsh usage today, however, dan (originally the soft mutation of tan) has become a preposition in its own right with the meaning "under" whereas tan means "until", retaining the meaning "under" in certain expressions, compound words and place names. Modern dan or tan are not usually mutated. o dan is an alternative to dan.

See also

  • tân

Mutation


Wolof

Noun

tan (definite form tan mi)

  1. vulture

Yámana

Noun

tan

  1. earth, soil, dust, ground

Yogad

Adverb

tan

  1. more; -er

Zay

Etymology

Cognate to Silt'e [script needed] (tan).

Noun

tan

  1. smoke (from a fire)

References

  • Initial SLLE Survey of the Zway Area by Klaus Wedekind and Charlotte Wedekind

Source: wiktionary.org
  • TAM, a tight-fitting Scottish cap.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)